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Santa Clarita Ca Federal Aid

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal program aimed at preventing disasters before they can occur is providing $1.35 million to help pay for a flood control project in the Live Oak Springs Canyon area, Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon announced. The remainder of the $3.7-million project--which calls for construction of an underground drain and debris basin to convey runoff from the canyon to the Santa Clara River--will be paid for by the city, officials said. "This was identified as Santa Clarita's No.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
The cities of Pico Rivera, Lancaster, Palmdale and Santa Clarita will receive a total of $2.1 million in federal housing funds, boosting local efforts to aid poor and elderly residents, officials have announced. The money comes from nearly $42.7 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to be handed out across the state, Gov. Gray Davis said in a statement issued this week. Pico Rivera's $498,750 grant will also fund repair projects by poor homeowners, the statement said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
The cities of Pico Rivera, Lancaster, Palmdale and Santa Clarita will receive a total of $2.1 million in federal housing funds, boosting local efforts to aid poor and elderly residents, officials have announced. The money comes from nearly $42.7 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to be handed out across the state, Gov. Gray Davis said in a statement issued this week. Pico Rivera's $498,750 grant will also fund repair projects by poor homeowners, the statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eager to avoid a pipe rupture that could potentially send millions of gallons of raw sewage flowing into the Pacific Ocean, county officials say they are nearing an agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to repair a damaged sewer line that runs beneath the Santa Clara River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city has received a federal grant of more than $4.6 million to help with earthquake recovery and wants to know how to spend it. Public meetings have been scheduled for 5 p.m. today at Canyon Country Park and 2 p.m. Tuesday in City Hall for Santa Clarita residents to offer suggestions. The grant is the fourth largest made by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to municipalities hammered by the Northridge earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In addition to shaking up everything else here, the Northridge earthquake shifted the bottom line of Santa Clarita's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival. Federal Emergency Management Agency officials have announced that they won't reimburse Santa Clarita the $22,500 spent to hold last month's festival at the Melody Ranch movie lot rather than at a high school auditorium damaged in the quake. "That just isn't covered," said George Thune, FEMA spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | SCOTT GLOVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials are asking the federal government for $13,000 to help pay for the relocation of an upcoming festival that was displaced by the Northridge earthquake. The city will pay $15,000 to hold next month's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival at the historic Melody Ranch Motion Picture Studio in Newhall. The event was originally slated for the William S. Hart High School auditorium at a cost of $2,000, but had to be moved after the auditorium was severely damaged in the quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eager to avoid a pipe rupture that could potentially send millions of gallons of raw sewage flowing into the Pacific Ocean, county officials say they are nearing an agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to repair a damaged sewer line that runs beneath the Santa Clara River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This city will receive the fourth-largest earthquake recovery grant given by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to municipalities hammered by the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake. The $4.6-million HUD grant can be used to repair quake damage not paid for by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Small Business Administration or similar government funding sources. Roads, housing and community programs are eligible for the revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Santa Clarita, which recently applied for $78.2 million in federal funds for highway and road improvements, currently has no plan for raising its share of the construction costs, a city official said Thursday. The city has applied for some of the $150 billion available under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, declaring it would use the money to improve several interchanges and roads near the Golden State Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal program aimed at preventing disasters before they can occur is providing $1.35 million to help pay for a flood control project in the Live Oak Springs Canyon area, Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon announced. The remainder of the $3.7-million project--which calls for construction of an underground drain and debris basin to convey runoff from the canyon to the Santa Clara River--will be paid for by the city, officials said. "This was identified as Santa Clarita's No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Santa Clarita, which recently applied for $78.2 million in federal funds for highway and road improvements, currently has no plan for raising its share of the construction costs, a city official said Thursday. The city has applied for some of the $150 billion available under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, declaring it would use the money to improve several interchanges and roads near the Golden State Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city has received a federal grant of more than $4.6 million to help with earthquake recovery and wants to know how to spend it. Public meetings have been scheduled for 5 p.m. today at Canyon Country Park and 2 p.m. Tuesday in City Hall for Santa Clarita residents to offer suggestions. The grant is the fourth largest made by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to municipalities hammered by the Northridge earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In addition to shaking up everything else here, the Northridge earthquake shifted the bottom line of Santa Clarita's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival. Federal Emergency Management Agency officials have announced that they won't reimburse Santa Clarita the $22,500 spent to hold last month's festival at the Melody Ranch movie lot rather than at a high school auditorium damaged in the quake. "That just isn't covered," said George Thune, FEMA spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This city will receive the fourth-largest earthquake recovery grant given by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to municipalities hammered by the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake. The $4.6-million HUD grant can be used to repair quake damage not paid for by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Small Business Administration or similar government funding sources. Roads, housing and community programs are eligible for the revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | SCOTT GLOVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials are asking the federal government for $13,000 to help pay for the relocation of an upcoming festival that was displaced by the Northridge earthquake. The city will pay $15,000 to hold next month's Cowboy Poetry, Music and Film Festival at the historic Melody Ranch Motion Picture Studio in Newhall. The event was originally slated for the William S. Hart High School auditorium at a cost of $2,000, but had to be moved after the auditorium was severely damaged in the quake.
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