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Santa Clarita Ca History

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
In 1842, Francisco Lopez was inspecting cattle and hunting for game with two men in the lower end of what is now called Placerita Canyon in the Santa Clarita Valley. They stopped for lunch under a large, oddly shaped tree next to a river bank, the story goes, where Lopez napped and dreamed he was floating in a pool of liquid gold. When he woke up, Lopez began digging at some nearby wild onions with his sheath knife and he spotted a bit of gold. This time it wasn't a dream.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many human beings, Santa Clarita spent its youth shocking its sober-sided elders with unusual experiments in bohemian living. Its reputation for offbeat--the critics said bizarre--public policy innovations made it the stuff of jokes on late-night TV shows. City officials once gathered local barbers and beauticians to learn what was on residents' minds, figuring that most people reveal what they're thinking to the person who does their hair.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he has virtually every weekend for the past five years, Norm Harris of Newhall spent a few hours on a recent Sunday morning at the Saugus train station. Harris, 53, dons heavy work gloves and hammers away at a 95-year-old air compressor, the device that controls a locomotive's brakes. The chunk of machinery is larger than most car engines and is vastly different from what he works with as an engineer for Hughes Aircraft. The task at hand: The compressor's valves are jammed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he has virtually every weekend for the past five years, Norm Harris of Newhall spent a few hours on a recent Sunday morning at the Saugus train station. Harris, 53, dons heavy work gloves and hammers away at a 95-year-old air compressor, the device that controls a locomotive's brakes. The chunk of machinery is larger than most car engines and is vastly different from what he works with as an engineer for Hughes Aircraft. The task at hand: The compressor's valves are jammed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1994 | DOUG ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes it seems as if everyone in Southern California has an agent. Now, even the city of Santa Clarita has one. Tucked into a concrete triangle formed by the Golden State and Antelope Valley freeways, Santa Clarita encompasses 43 square miles of prominent ridgelines, majestic oak trees and bedroom communities. Its population is affluent, dominated by families proud of the area's good schools and low crime rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many human beings, Santa Clarita spent its youth shocking its sober-sided elders with unusual experiments in bohemian living. Its reputation for offbeat--the critics said bizarre--public policy innovations made it the stuff of jokes on late-night TV shows. City officials once gathered local barbers and beauticians to learn what was on residents' minds, figuring that most people reveal what they're thinking to the person who does their hair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
In 1842, Francisco Lopez was inspecting cattle and hunting for game with two men in the lower end of what is now called Placerita Canyon in the Santa Clarita Valley. They stopped for lunch under a large, oddly shaped tree next to a river bank, the story goes, where Lopez napped and dreamed he was floating in a pool of liquid gold. When he woke up, Lopez began digging at some nearby wild onions with his sheath knife and he spotted a bit of gold. This time it wasn't a dream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1994 | DOUG ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes it seems as if everyone in Southern California has an agent. Now, even the city of Santa Clarita has one. Tucked into a concrete triangle formed by the Golden State and Antelope Valley freeways, Santa Clarita encompasses 43 square miles of prominent ridgelines, majestic oak trees and bedroom communities. Its population is affluent, dominated by families proud of the area's good schools and low crime rate.
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