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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995
When company's coming, even an old, abandoned oil town could use a sprucing-up. Wielding paintbrushes and pruning tools, volunteers recruited by Santa Clarita City Hall and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will give historic Mentryville, a 119-year-old ghost town, a new look next month before it opens to the public later this year. Mentryville--a 20-acre site with eight buildings intact--is part of a 3,000-acre plot of parkland in Pico Canyon that Chevron Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995
When company's coming, even an old, abandoned oil town could use a sprucing-up. Wielding paintbrushes and pruning tools, volunteers recruited by Santa Clarita City Hall and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will give historic Mentryville, a 119-year-old ghost town, a new look next month before it opens to the public later this year. Mentryville--a 20-acre site with eight buildings intact--is part of a 3,000-acre plot of parkland in Pico Canyon that Chevron Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists Monday called on Santa Clarita to buy ecologically sensitive land to save it from development, and the City Council is expected to take the first steps tonight to do just that. The Santa Clarita Organization for Planning and Environment urged local, county and state governments to consider buying up large tracts of land that have been classed by Los Angeles County as Significant Ecological Areas, or SEAs, because they contain unique and sensitive wildlife habitat.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest parkland deals in recent Southern California history, Chevron Corp. has agreed to sell the state more than 3,000 acres of lush meadows, dense woodlands and stream-cut canyons in the heart of the proposed Santa Clarita Woodlands park. In an agreement to be announced Monday, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will acquire the 3,035-acre tract for $4.9 million, with help from the city of Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With unusual backing from a cadre of naturalists, a 117-acre development that would require removing 245 oak trees received unanimous conceptual approval from the Planning Commission Tuesday night. The Valley Gateway project by Hondo Oil & Gas Co. would create nearly a million square feet of business park and corporate office space while removing more than one-fifth of the designated area's 1,114 oak trees.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest parkland deals in recent Southern California history, Chevron Corp. has agreed to sell the state more than 3,000 acres of lush meadows, dense woodlands and stream-cut canyons in the heart of the proposed Santa Clarita Woodlands park. In an agreement to be announced Monday, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will acquire the 3,035-acre tract for $4.9 million, with help from the city of Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With unusual backing from a cadre of naturalists, a 117-acre development that would require removing 245 oak trees received unanimous conceptual approval from the Planning Commission Tuesday night. The Valley Gateway project by Hondo Oil & Gas Co. would create nearly a million square feet of business park and corporate office space while removing more than one-fifth of the designated area's 1,114 oak trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1991 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists Monday called on Santa Clarita to buy ecologically sensitive land to save it from development, and the City Council is expected to take the first steps tonight to do just that. The Santa Clarita Organization for Planning and Environment urged local, county and state governments to consider buying up large tracts of land that have been classed by Los Angeles County as Significant Ecological Areas, or SEAs, because they contain unique and sensitive wildlife habitat.
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