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Santa Clarita City Council

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN
The city of Santa Clarita will ask the county Board of Supervisors to overturn a decision allowing construction of a golf course and housing tract in an oak woodland designated as ecologically sensitive. The Santa Clarita City Council voted 3 to 2 late Tuesday to appeal the county Regional Planning Commission's approval of the 1,868-unit project, known as Westridge. Proposed by Newhall Land & Farming Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1992
The Santa Clarita City Council has approved a resolution limiting the duration of development agreements with builders. Most of the agreements would be limited to seven years. But under the resolution approved Tuesday, the council will have the flexibility to extend the length of the agreements, which guarantee that long-term commercial and residential projects can be completed even if growth-control measures and new development standards are enacted later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW
After more than two hours of public testimony, the Santa Clarita City Council postponed a decision on what type of public cable television to establish in the city. More than 200 people packed the council chambers Tuesday only to have the council vote to wait 30 days for further guidelines from the Federal Communications Commission. Public testimony at the meeting was evenly divided between factions who supported either public access or local origination television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1991
The Santa Clarita City Council adopted an emergency ordinance Tuesday that restricts water usage, but stops far short of rationing programs imposed elsewhere in the state. The ordinance, intended to reduce water use by 25%, makes such practices as hosing off sidewalks and driveways illegal, but does not set reduction goals for each household and business. Other provisions of the ordinance limit the watering of landscaping to every other day .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988
The Santa Clarita City Council is sponsoring a contest to select a logo that will symbolize the 85th city in Los Angeles County and appear on all its official stationery. After years of trying, Santa Clarita residents voted overwhelmingly in a November incorporation election to form their own city. The logo contest is not limited to city residents, and designs may be submitted by individuals or groups. The winning entry will receive a $500 prize.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994
The recent decision of the Santa Clarita City Council to close City Hall every other Friday is not in the best interest of the taxpayers. The impetus for the closure is a mandate from the state to reduce traffic and pollution. There are many ways to accomplish this without closing City Hall for a three-day vacation every other week. Businesses around town have found other solutions to the same mandate. Car pooling is a good way to accomplish the task at hand. Using public transportation is another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991
The Santa Clarita City Council has adopted its first growth-management plan, the first step toward annexing most of the surrounding valley. Completion late Tuesday of the state-mandated plan, which has been under development for nearly three years, allows the 43-square-mile city to revive its attempt to extend its influence over 160 square miles of unincorporated land in the surrounding Santa Clarita Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1988
George Caravalho, a former Bakersfield city manager, was named Santa Clarita's first city manager Monday night. The announcement was made at a special budget meeting of the Santa Clarita City Council. Caravalho, 45, could not be reached for comment. Mayor Howard P. (Buck) McKeon said Caravalho was selected from 54 applicants. Caravalho was fired after three years as city manager of Bakersfield after a new City Council was elected in January, McKeon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1989
The Santa Clarita City Council has approved an ordinance, more than a year in the making, to preserve oak trees, long regarded as the symbol of the Santa Clarita Valley. The measure refines an emergency oak ordinance passed the day the city incorporated Dec. 15, 1987. The new ordinance, approved Tuesday night, spells out how and when residents may trim or remove the trees. City officials said the new ordinance is more flexible than the emergency measure, which required residents to obtain $125 permits to trim or remove trees.
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