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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City Hall will remain closed for 60 to 90 days to allow work crews to shore up columns in the earthquake-battered building. Officials estimate that it will cost $3 million to restore the three-story structure, triple the initial projection. The decision Tuesday to close City Hall came as a surprise to city employees and building tenants, who had expected to begin working out of the Valencia Boulevard site this week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most city departments here are tightening their fiscal belts for the third year in a row, but construction projects dominated by street and trail work have inflated Santa Clarita's 1994-1995 draft budget to $66.3 million. Spending in the preliminary document is about $16 million more than last year. The budget proposal includes no cost-of-living pay increases for employees, other than sheriff's deputies, and leaves three full-time posts unfilled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a strict dress code for Santa Clarita Mayor Jill Klajic's party tonight: No suits or ties, no dresses or high-heeled shoes. Just pajamas. Yes, a grown-up pajama party. No, men are not invited. This will be the mayor's fifth women-only pajama party in the past two years--a tradition that has generated both humor and controversy at City Hall in Santa Clarita, the new little city that is rapidly establishing a reputation as the capital of offbeat municipal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City Hall will remain closed for 60 to 90 days to allow work crews to shore up columns in the earthquake-battered building. Officials estimate that it will cost $3 million to restore the three-story structure, triple the initial projection. The decision Tuesday to close City Hall came as a surprise to city employees and building tenants, who had expected to begin working out of the Valencia Boulevard site this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most city departments here are tightening their fiscal belts for the third year in a row, but construction projects dominated by street and trail work have inflated Santa Clarita's 1994-1995 draft budget to $66.3 million. Spending in the preliminary document is about $16 million more than last year. The budget proposal includes no cost-of-living pay increases for employees, other than sheriff's deputies, and leaves three full-time posts unfilled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989
A power plant under construction in Newhall that has been vigorously opposed by neighbors and the Santa Clarita city government will not pollute the air or contaminate the water supply, according to findings of an environmental study released Thursday. The inch-thick study, commissioned by the Santa Clarita City Council, also said the plant would not produce significant noise or odors. The power plant is located near an active earthquake fault, but even a severe quake probably would not cause any environmental damage, the study said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH
The Santa Clarita city government has expressed support for a decision by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to more than double the Consolidated Fire Protection District's annual tax on single-family residences, from $13.99 to $36.55, to prevent service cutbacks. Santa Clarita, which contracts with the county for firefighting services, was the scene of two brush fires last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do Santa Claritans think of their city? If you believe the responses to a city survey circulated among local business leaders, they hate it, love it and, in some cases, both. One respondent praised Santa Clarita because it is close to Los Angeles and has a low crime rate and good shopping. Showing that memories of the drought are short, another liked the lack of rain. On the downside, some business leaders charged that the city is too weighted with regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Calling themselves "dreadfully naive" in their preparations for a catastrophe, officials at a tiny airport here are updating their 15-year-old disaster plan in the wake of the Northridge earthquake. The Agua Dulce Air Park's revamped plan, which will catalogue community resources and emergency volunteers, includes the purchase of new radio equipment. It also resurrects a decades-long squabble over the small airport's possible expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, Times Staff Writer
A power plant under construction in Newhall, vigorously opposed by neighbors and the Santa Clarita city government, will not pollute the air or contaminate the local water supply, an environmental study said Thursday. The inch-thick study, commissioned by the Santa Clarita City Council, also said the plant would not produce significant noise or odors. The power plant is near an active earthquake fault, but even a severe quake probably would not cause any environmental damage, the study said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a strict dress code for Santa Clarita Mayor Jill Klajic's party tonight: No suits or ties, no dresses or high-heeled shoes. Just pajamas. Yes, a grown-up pajama party. No, men are not invited. This will be the mayor's fifth women-only pajama party in the past two years--a tradition that has generated both humor and controversy at City Hall in Santa Clarita, the new little city that is rapidly establishing a reputation as the capital of offbeat municipal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A development company facing stiff opposition as it seeks county approval to build a 2,502-unit housing project has turned for help to an influential political group: soccer moms. The Evans-Collins development company of Newport Beach promised to donate more than 50 acres of its planned 1,795-acre Tesoro del Valle project to the Youth Sports Assn. in Santa Clarita for use as playing fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2003 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
The discovery of high levels of the toxic chemical perchlorate on a troubled parcel in Santa Clarita may lead to the source of contamination that shut down five drinking water wells in the area, according to an official with the state Department of Toxic Substances Control. Perchlorate, a byproduct of rocket fuel that has been linked to thyroid problems in humans, has been known to exist for years at the site, once home to a munitions factory.
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