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Santa Clarita Organization For Planning The Environment Scope

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They have picketed, sued and held a mass funeral for 150 oak trees, some 100 years older than the Declaration of Independence. Protecting the Santa Clarita Valley, with its good schools, clean air and three-spined stickleback fish, from being trampled by frenzied development is their declared mission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They have picketed, sued and held a mass funeral for 150 oak trees, some 100 years older than the Declaration of Independence. Protecting the Santa Clarita Valley, with its good schools, clean air and three-spined stickleback fish, from being trampled by frenzied development is their declared mission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | JEFF PRUGH
The Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment (SCOPE) has filed a lawsuit challenging the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors' approval of the planned 1,880-house Westridge residential development in Stevenson Ranch, just west of Santa Clarita. The suit was filed Oct. 8 in Los Angeles Superior Court and joined by the Sierra Club and Stevenson Ranch Residents for Responsible Development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | GREG SANDOVAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An Agoura Hills-based developer paid $71,800 in retroactive fees Wednesday for cutting down two 300-year-old oak trees in violation of a Los Angeles County ordinance, then angered environmentalists by asking permission to cut down two more. At a hearing in Los Angeles by the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission, the commission ordered executives of the Dale Poe Development Corp. to pay "mitigation fees" for cutting down the two trees in October 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1994
Supervisors Mike Antonovich (Los Angeles) and Maggie Kildee (Ventura) have appointed a 25-member steering committee to develop a management and enhancement plan for the Santa Clarita River. This long-term cooperative planning effort for the river has been jeopardized by the actions of one of the groups represented on the committee. The committee members represent the various interested parties including federal, state and local regulatory agencies; businesses; environmentalists; farmers; cities; counties, and property owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1997
Re "SCOPE Takes On Newhall Ranch in Its Biggest Battle," April 14. Thanks for doing a feature on Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment (SCOPE). There are just two quick points we believe were not properly covered by the article. The first is that litigation for us is always a very regrettable last resort. It is only undertaken after many hours of negotiation, public testimony and written comments have failed to persuade a public agency and / or developer to follow the law. It is also used only when the project approval will result in potentially far-reaching problems, such as inadequate schools, libraries or fire and sheriff's services, dangerous traffic situations or loss of important natural areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996 | JOHN M. GONZALES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council has taken a major step toward the largest industrial land annexation in Santa Clarita's eight-year history, voting to take over a 377-acre tract on which Lockheed Martin Corp. plans to expand an existing facility. City planners project the site on the north end of Rye Canyon Road will be home to about 10,500 jobs in 10 to 20 years, when the proposed buildings are fully occupied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994
James Harter's letter (Feb. 21) leaves the impression that the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment (SCOPE) is trying to hamstring poor family farmers trying to save their citrus groves from the Santa Clara River running wild. Yet Mr. Harter is a senior vice president of a firm which used yards and yards of concrete to channelize a portion of Bouquet Creek, a tributary of the Santa Clara, without bothering to obtain the necessary permits. We are not talking about sandbags stemming a flood's sudden overflow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an all-or-nothing gamble, environmentalists who two months ago won a half-victory in a lawsuit halting the 1,880-home Westridge development on Wednesday appealed the ruling in an attempt to win the other half. The appeal goes to the heart of Los Angeles County's administration of its network of 61 Significant Ecological Areas, a system that environmentalists feel the county has allowed to be plundered by developers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Michael A. Kotch, 52, an environmental activist who spoke out against rampant development in the fast-growing Santa Clarita Valley, died Sunday at his home in Castaic. The cause of death was not announced. Kotch was the co-founder and, from 1993 to 2000, president of the Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment, or SCOPE, one of the area's best-known environmental groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By less than 1%, Ed Dunn appears to be the only challenger to have upset a four-candidate incumbent faction in the Castaic Lake Water Agency board race, according to the latest results Wednesday from the county registrar-recorder. In the remaining three seats up for election, two incumbents and a candidate they backed each had at least a 23 percentage-point lead. But water-board critic Dunn had a slim 83-vote lead over Division 1 incumbent Randall Pfiester. Dunn had 50.42% and Pfiester 49.
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