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Santa Clarita Valley Education

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the fight continues over who should operate Head Start programs, hundreds of children continue attending classes daily, oblivious to the adult crisis around them. During a recent visit to a classroom at the Martin Luther King Center in Pacoima--one of 87 Head Start classes run by the Latin American Civic Assn. in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys--children noisily played with toy telephones, sang songs in Spanish and English, drew pictures with crayons and ate a nutritious lunch.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the fight continues over who should operate Head Start programs, hundreds of children continue attending classes daily, oblivious to the adult crisis around them. During a recent visit to a classroom at the Martin Luther King Center in Pacoima--one of 87 Head Start classes run by the Latin American Civic Assn. in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys--children noisily played with toy telephones, sang songs in Spanish and English, drew pictures with crayons and ate a nutritious lunch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000
Re "For the Most Vulnerable Poor, Lack of Dental Care Is a Barrier," Aug. 20. Thank you for publishing the essay from the UCLA School of Dentistry [professors] on lack of dental care for children. I feel compelled to share with your readers a program developed in Santa Clarita to deal with this issue. This program could easily be replicated in other communities. The Foundation for Children's Dental Health provides free dental care, dental education and emergency dental services for the area's poorest children and their families.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2002 | JON HEALEY and ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In its quest to offer long-distance service to Californians, SBC Pacific Bell mounted the lobbying equivalent of a full-court press. It lined up hundreds of business and civic groups to support its application before the California Public Utilities Commission, drawing on a long history of philanthropy and goodwill. It took critics out of the debate by providing aid to one and silencing another through a legal settlement.
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