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Santa Clarita Valley Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like some modern-day caveman, Jason Lems adjusts his sunglasses and motions toward the Vasquez Rocks--twisted, angry stone formations that have been the Santa Clarita Valley's loneliest landmarks for 20 million years. "There," says the 21-year-old park ranger, pointing toward a half-finished structure the color of cartoon orange. "That's Fred's house. Barney's going to live right next door." He's talking, of course, about Fred Flintstone and his pint-sized pal, Barney Rubble.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1995 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Demonstrators gathered Wednesday at a market that had long been a local landmark but was now scheduled for demolition. The Fire Department had planned to ignite the abandoned building, formerly known as Dillenbeck's Market, and use the occasion as a training exercise for firefighters. But in a twist on conservancy movements that have swept the nation, the 25 demonstrators at this site were not there to try to save the building.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opponents of a proposed landfill in Elsmere Canyon believe they have the key to preventing it. A car key. The Santa Clarita Valley Canyons Preservation Committee has persuaded eight Valencia automobile dealerships to donate their profits from the sale of 21 vehicles sold today through June 30 to anti-dump efforts. If the 1993 cars, trucks and minivans are sold, everything above the factory invoice will go to the committee. Dump opponents hope to receive $500 to $1,000 per vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opponents of a proposed landfill in Elsmere Canyon believe they have the key to preventing it. A car key. The Santa Clarita Valley Canyons Preservation Committee has persuaded eight Valencia automobile dealerships to donate their profits from the sale of 21 vehicles sold today through June 30 to anti-dump efforts. If the 1993 cars, trucks and minivans are sold, everything above the factory invoice will go to the committee. Dump opponents hope to receive $500 to $1,000 per vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition to the proposed Elsmere Canyon dump is taking on many forms, from the historic to the psychic. Two Santa Clarita Valley organizations have petitioned the state Historical Resources Commission to designate a rock in the canyon as historic. Meanwhile, another group has trekked onto the landfill site with a psychic who evoked Indian spirits to protect the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1995 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Demonstrators gathered Wednesday at a market that had long been a local landmark but was now scheduled for demolition. The Fire Department had planned to ignite the abandoned building, formerly known as Dillenbeck's Market, and use the occasion as a training exercise for firefighters. But in a twist on conservancy movements that have swept the nation, the 25 demonstrators at this site were not there to try to save the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like some modern-day caveman, Jason Lems adjusts his sunglasses and motions toward the Vasquez Rocks--twisted, angry stone formations that have been the Santa Clarita Valley's loneliest landmarks for 20 million years. "There," says the 21-year-old park ranger, pointing toward a half-finished structure the color of cartoon orange. "That's Fred's house. Barney's going to live right next door." He's talking, of course, about Fred Flintstone and his pint-size pal, Barney Rubble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition to the proposed Elsmere Canyon dump is taking on many forms, from the historic to the psychic. Two Santa Clarita Valley organizations have petitioned the state Historical Resources Commission to designate a rock in the canyon as historic. Meanwhile, another group has trekked onto the landfill site with a psychic who evoked Indian spirits to protect the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like some modern-day caveman, Jason Lems adjusts his sunglasses and motions toward the Vasquez Rocks--twisted, angry stone formations that have been the Santa Clarita Valley's loneliest landmarks for 20 million years. "There," says the 21-year-old park ranger, pointing toward a half-finished structure the color of cartoon orange. "That's Fred's house. Barney's going to live right next door." He's talking, of course, about Fred Flintstone and his pint-sized pal, Barney Rubble.
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