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Santa Clarita Woodlands State Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989
The purchase of 145 acres of pristine woodlands west of Santa Clarita for a new park--a move that could hinder plans by the county to open a garbage dump in the area--was announced Wednesday by an environmental group and state Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia). Davis said the new Towsley Canyon Park, which was immediately opened to the public, is the first step toward creating a proposed 6,000-acre Santa Clarita Woodlands State Park west of Santa Clarita and north of Granada Hills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ascending the dramatic slopes of the Santa Clarita Woodlands on a sunstruck day, Rorie Skei can barely contain her affection for the place and what lives there. "Aren't you a pretty thing," she murmurs to a rare Cooper's hawk that has lighted in a barren tree alongside the old oil road toiling up the flanks of rugged Pico Canyon. Near a stream that spills through Rice Canyon, a slender valley oak has strewn the footpath with acorns the size of a large man's thumb.
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NEWS
June 17, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy has reached a tentative agreement to purchase 11 acres of parkland in the Santa Clarita Valley for $2.8 million, which would be the largest amount ever paid by the state agency for such a small parcel. The agreement will be considered by the conservancy's board of directors Monday. By comparison, the conservancy purchased 145 acres in the same area for $500,000 last December. "It is a lot to pay for 11 acres," Joseph T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ascending the dramatic slopes of the Santa Clarita Woodlands on a sunstruck day, Rorie Skei can barely contain her affection for the place and what lives there. "Aren't you a pretty thing," she murmurs to a rare Cooper's hawk that has lighted in a barren tree alongside the old oil road toiling up the flanks of rugged Pico Canyon. Near a stream that spills through Rice Canyon, a slender valley oak has strewn the footpath with acorns the size of a large man's thumb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy has reached a tentative agreement to purchase 11 acres of parkland in the Santa Clarita Valley for $2.8 million, which would be the largest amount ever paid by the state agency for such a small parcel. The agreement will be considered by the conservancy's board of directors Monday. By comparison, the conservancy purchased 145 acres in the same area for $500,000 last December. "It is a lot to pay for 11 acres," Joseph T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
Prospects that 453 acres of Towsley Canyon in the western Santa Clarita Valley will become a park rather than a dump have been boosted by acquisition of the land by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a county official said Thursday. Don Nellor, head of the solid waste planning division of the Los Angeles County Sanitation District, said it would be "very difficult" to get approval for a landfill in Towsley Canyon if there is a state park next door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ascending the dramatic slopes of the Santa Clarita Woodlands on a sunstruck day, Rorie Skei can barely contain her affection for the place and what lives there. "Aren't you a pretty thing," she murmurs to a rare Cooper's hawk that has lighted in a barren tree alongside the old oil road toiling up the flanks of rugged Pico Canyon. Near a stream that spills through Rice Canyon, a slender valley oak has strewn the footpath with acorns the size of a large man's thumb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ascending the dramatic slopes of the Santa Clarita Woodlands on a sunstruck day, Rorie Skei can barely contain her affection for the place and what lives there. "Aren't you a pretty thing," she murmurs to a rare Cooper's hawk that has lighted in a barren tree alongside the old oil road toiling up the flanks of rugged Pico Canyon. Near a stream that spills through Rice Canyon, a slender valley oak has strewn the footpath with acorns the size of a large man's thumb.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest parkland deals in recent Southern California history, Chevron Corp. has agreed to sell the state more than 3,000 acres of lush meadows, dense woodlands and stream-cut canyons in the heart of the proposed Santa Clarita Woodlands park. In an agreement to be announced Monday, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will acquire the 3,035-acre tract for $4.9 million, with help from the city of Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, criticized recently for trying to block acquisition of land for a dump in Elsmere Canyon, is trying to buy property in another Santa Clarita Valley canyon under consideration as a landfill site. At issue is Towsley Canyon, the scenic entrance to a pristine woodland west of Santa Clarita. Environmentalists hail the area as a unique collection of forests, meadows and waterfalls more reminiscent of Northern California than Greater Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 6, 1995 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest parkland deals in recent Southern California history, Chevron Corp. has agreed to sell the state more than 3,000 acres of lush meadows, dense woodlands and stream-cut canyons in the heart of the proposed Santa Clarita Woodlands park. In an agreement to be announced Monday, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will acquire the 3,035-acre tract for $4.9 million, with help from the city of Santa Clarita.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
Prospects that 453 acres of Towsley Canyon in the western Santa Clarita Valley will become a park rather than a dump have been boosted by acquisition of the land by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a county official said Thursday. Don Nellor, head of the solid waste planning division of the Los Angeles County Sanitation District, said it would be "very difficult" to get approval for a landfill in Towsley Canyon if there is a state park next door.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy has reached a tentative agreement to purchase 11 acres of parkland in the Santa Clarita Valley for $2.8 million, which would be the largest amount ever paid by the state agency for such a small parcel. The agreement will be considered by the conservancy's board of directors Monday. By comparison, the conservancy purchased 145 acres in the same area for $500,000 last December. "It is a lot to pay for 11 acres," Joseph T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy has reached a tentative agreement to purchase 11 acres of parkland in the Santa Clarita Valley for $2.8 million, which would be the largest amount ever paid by the state agency for such a small parcel. The agreement will be considered by the conservancy's board of directors Monday. By comparison, the conservancy purchased 145 acres in the same area for $500,000 last December. "It is a lot to pay for 11 acres," Joseph T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989
The purchase of 145 acres of pristine woodlands west of Santa Clarita for a new park--a move that could hinder plans by the county to open a garbage dump in the area--was announced Wednesday by an environmental group and state Sen. Ed Davis (R-Valencia). Davis said the new Towsley Canyon Park, which was immediately opened to the public, is the first step toward creating a proposed 6,000-acre Santa Clarita Woodlands State Park west of Santa Clarita and north of Granada Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, criticized recently for trying to block acquisition of land for a dump in Elsmere Canyon, is trying to buy property in another Santa Clarita Valley canyon under consideration as a landfill site. At issue is Towsley Canyon, the scenic entrance to a pristine woodland west of Santa Clarita. Environmentalists hail the area as a unique collection of forests, meadows and waterfalls more reminiscent of Northern California than Greater Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990
Proposition B on Tuesday's ballot includes $10 million specifically for purchasing Significant Ecological Areas. The $817-million bond proposal, known as the Safe Neighborhood Parks Act, earmarks the money to buy land in SEAs in the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys. Additional funds would probably be spent in SEAs in other areas, although dollar amounts are uncertain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989
The state Department of Parks and Recreation will hold the first of two public hearings tonight on two proposals to expand parkland in the Santa Susana Mountains. Tonight's hearing will begin at 7:30 at Saugus High School, 21900 Centurion Way, Santa Clarita. Another hearing will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Simi City Council Chambers, 2929 Tapo Canyon Road, Simi Valley.
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