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Santa Cruz Island

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
After four years of intense planning, the controversial effort to eradicate up to 4,000 destructive wild pigs on Santa Cruz Island has officially begun. Lines of fencing are being thrown up across the rugged island, beginning the slow encirclement of the swine. Once the pigs are trapped inside the fences, they will be stalked and shot by contract hunters. "I am just thrilled to have it underway," said Lynn Lozier, Santa Cruz Island project director for the Nature Conservancy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in three months, a cadre of golden eagles on Santa Cruz Island has outfoxed a helicopter crew trying to capture them, leaving frustrated wildlife managers to fall back on more traditional trapping methods. The helicopter, aided by 20 spotters on the ground, spent the week chasing the powerful birds across steep ridges, into canyons and along sheer sea cliffs. But whenever the helicopter closed in, the eagles slipped away, ducking for cover beneath trees and ledges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bedraggled bald eagle, recently set free on Santa Cruz Island, is recovering after being plucked from the ocean by two men returning from a diving trip around Channel Islands National Park. The Alaska-born eagle was released last month as part of a major effort to reintroduce the species to the Channel Islands. A dozen eagles have been released on Santa Cruz Island this year, and another 12 are to be set free there annually for the next five years.
OPINION
September 23, 2002
Re "Hunters to Trap and Shoot Pigs on Santa Cruz Island," Sept. 17: The National Park Service's plan proposes to pay professional hunters $4 million to $5 million to shoot the wild pigs after spending $2 million to erect fences to prevent the pigs from re-inhabiting previously cleared areas. Tens of thousands of hunters purchased tags to hunt wild pigs in California during 2001-02. Many of these hunters pay $300 to $600 to hunt wild pigs with guides on private ranches. Why doesn't the National Park Service collaborate with the California Department of Fish and Game and offer public wild pig hunting on Santa Cruz Island?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2002 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of wild pigs that have been uprooting environmentally sensitive land on Santa Cruz Island will be methodically hunted and shot over the next six years under a National Park Service plan. Eradicating the nonnative pigs, as outlined in an environmental document released this month, is a major step in a broader effort to restore Santa Cruz Island to its natural state, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catering to those seeking a more isolated wilderness experience, Channel Islands National Park hopes to expand the length and number of trails on Santa Cruz Island while building several remote campsites in the back country. The proposal, put forward by park Supt. Tim Setnicka, is part of a plan to attract more visitors to Santa Cruz, the largest of the Channel islands. The park service controls about 25% of the 62,000-acre island, while the Nature Conservancy owns the rest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a Santa Cruz Island bluff high over the ocean, Sam Spaulding looked helplessly among ragged holes and uprooted fennel plants at scattered mounds of Chumash artifacts. "This chunk of material is not in its natural state," said Spaulding, an archeologist for Channel Islands National Park. "The pigs moved it. It's out of place, out of time. It doesn't have any credible place in the story of this site. It's like ripping the page out of a book."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy fog and some nifty flying helped the last three golden eagles on Santa Cruz Island foil an intense air and land campaign by wildlife managers to remove them from Channel Islands National Park. The fox-eating eagles outfoxed pursuers in a helicopter by diving into fog banks, ducking under trees and zipping below jagged ridgelines. The two-week effort ended last week with the eagles still free and scientists pondering their next move.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A day after nesting boxes holding four young bald eagles were opened on Santa Cruz Island, one of the birds has left and two others were last seen standing on the doors apparently still deciding whether to fly away. The fourth bird remained inside. The animals are part of a five-year effort to reestablish bald eagles in Channel Islands National Park. Eagles disappeared from the area 50 years ago when DDT contamination thinned their eggshells and stopped successful hatching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Channel Islands National Park has opened a new back-country campground on Santa Cruz Island, 25 miles off the coast. The Del Norte campground is at the end of a moderately difficult 3 1/2-mile hike through a series of canyons and over ridges, to a vista about 1,500 feet above sea level. The campground has four sites, each equipped with a picnic table and access to a nearby pit toilet. Water is not available--it must be packed in--and no fires are permitted.
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