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Santa Fe Energy Co

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NEWS
December 28, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
This town is gradually fading away. Every time a family moves out, the oil company that owns all the land here buys the vacated home and has it demolished, clearing the way for drilling into the deposit of oil beneath Fellows. The Santa Fe Energy Co. is a benign landlord, by most accounts. The company has never forced anyone out of town. It owns one-year leases on all the houses, and no one who has wanted to renew one has ever been refused.
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NEWS
December 28, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
This town is gradually fading away. Every time a family moves out, the oil company that owns all the land here buys the vacated home and has it demolished, clearing the way for drilling into the deposit of oil beneath Fellows. The Santa Fe Energy Co. is a benign landlord, by most accounts. The company has never forced anyone out of town. It owns one-year leases on all the houses, and no one who has wanted to renew one has ever been refused.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1986
James L. Payne has been appointed president of Santa Fe Energy Co., Houston, succeeding Thomas M. Orth, who died last month. The company is a unit of Santa Fe Southern Pacific Corp., Chicago.
REAL ESTATE
June 12, 1988
Santa Fe Energy Co. has relocated to Heritage Corporate Center, 12070 Telegraph Road, Santa Fe Springs. Its longterm lease is valued at $3.2 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura County district attorney's office filed suit Friday in Superior Court to prevent a Texas oil company from oiling roads in the Sespe Wilderness with oil containing hazardous wastes. Deputy Dist. Atty. Marcia Strickland said the Santa Fe Energy Co. stopped using contaminated oil in 1987 to control dust on the roads through the Sespe and is cooperating with her office to negotiate a settlement of the suit.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1986 | JUBE SHIVER Jr.
Santa Fe-Southern Pacific Corp. reported that its net income for the third quarter plummeted due to a large writedown on its petroleum operations. Net income for the period ended Sept. 30 was $12.4 million, compared to $151.4 million a year ago. Revenue fell to $1.4 billion from $1.7 billion. The Chicago-based railroad and natural resources company recorded a writedown of $130.
NEWS
July 3, 1985 | MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writer
A hazardous waste dump site in Kern County managed by the vice chairman of the California Republican Party has been found to be "grossly" violating federal law and may be fined as much as $307,000, officials of the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed Tuesday. Environmental Protection Corp., a Bakersfield firm whose president is William H. Park--named last February to the state Republican post--"has grossly violated federal law and regulation," EPA regional administrator Judith E.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1987 | From Reuters
Santa Fe Southern Pacific, the diversified railroad company in the process of restructuring itself, said Tuesday that it will sell stock in its Santa Fe Energy Co., spinoff some real estate and buy back more than a third of its shares. The company, which said the announcements were part of its plans surrounding the government-required sale of its Southern Pacific railroad, said the share offering for its energy business should be completed by Dec. 31.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 29-year-old transient who was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of arson in a blaze that seared through Carbon Canyon told fire officials he had been making a pot of coffee when the flames accidentally got out of control. Peter Diaz Reyes told investigators he had set up camp Tuesday night behind the Santa Fe Energy Co. building on Carbon Canyon Road, where the blaze apparently originated, according to Orange County Fire Department Capt. Hank Raymond.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Amid the reeds and foxtails of Madrona Marsh, the red fox, ears erect, stood frozen, peering for a few seconds at the human intruders who had disturbed its solitary twilight search for supper. Then with a quick pivot, it vanished into the underbrush, leaving a stunning afterimage of untamed grace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A disturbed transient arrested on suspicion of starting a brush fire that charred more than 6,600 acres in Orange and San Bernardino counties offered conflicting and often apologetic accounts Wednesday as to how the fire started. During a jailhouse interview, Peter Diaz Reyes initially said he started the fire accidentally while trying to boil some coffee in the dry hills of Carbon Canyon near Brea. He gave fire investigators a similar version of events after his arrest Wednesday night.
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