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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an office suite near downtown, hunched behind computers or huddled in conversation, physicists offer economists new insight into world financial markets while mathematicians join with biologists to plumb the mysteries of human genetics. Such collaborations might seem out of place at some think tanks, but at the Santa Fe Institute, interdisciplinary research is a virtue.
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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an office suite near downtown, hunched behind computers or huddled in conversation, physicists offer economists new insight into world financial markets while mathematicians join with biologists to plumb the mysteries of human genetics. Such collaborations might seem out of place at some think tanks, but at the Santa Fe Institute, interdisciplinary research is a virtue.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Whether your taste in Dr. Frankensteins runs to Mary Shelley or Mel Brooks, this is where you'll find them--breeding, replicating, mutating, evolving and exchanging their recipes for "life." The Artificial Life II Conference--co-sponsored by the Santa Fe Institute and the Los Alamos National Laboratory--is a primordial soup of biologists, physicists, computer scientists and anthropologists all struggling not only to evolve new theories of life but to actually create new forms.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Whether your taste in Dr. Frankensteins runs to Mary Shelley or Mel Brooks, this is where you'll find them--breeding, replicating, mutating, evolving and exchanging their recipes for "life." The Artificial Life II Conference--co-sponsored by the Santa Fe Institute and the Los Alamos National Laboratory--is a primordial soup of biologists, physicists, computer scientists and anthropologists all struggling not only to evolve new theories of life but to actually create new forms.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Luke Glowacki
Do genes make us do it? The idea that human behavior is driven by genes makes many people uncomfortable, and nowhere is the dispute more bitter than when discussing the biological underpinnings of violence. The war of ideas over violence and human nature has raged since the 1600s, when philosopher Thomas Hobbes first speculated that the "natural condition of mankind" was one of violence and conflict. In the 1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau saw things differently. Enthralled with accounts of the New World, he argued that civilization, not nature, shaped the human propensity for violence.
BOOKS
June 26, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
COMPLEXIFICATION: Explaining a Paradoxical World Through the Science of Surprise by John L. Casti (HarperCollins; $24; 320 pp.). For two centuries, cyberneticist W. Ross Ashby observed in 1956, science "has been exploring systems that are either intrinsically simple or that are capable of being analyzed into simple components." Science, in other words, had tended to limit itself to investigating phenomena to which the scientific method lent itself . . .
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the usually breathless, gee-whiz world of science-writing, it isn't often that somebody pens a nasty rebuttal. Maybe that's why John Horgan's new book, which basically is an unauthorized biography of science, has so many scientists in such a bother. In "The End of Science," Horgan contends that humanity's quest for truth--a 4,000-year odyssey begun by the ancients and brought to a head in the technological 20th century--is all wrapped up.
NEWS
March 24, 2000
William Lumpkins, 90, an architect and artist who was one of the early painters in Santa Fe's art colony days and later was a founder of the Santa Fe Art Institute. Lumpkins championed passive-solar design and created homes that favored flowing room blocks and asymmetrical designs. He designed about 2,000 homes and other buildings in New Mexico, mostly in the Santa Fe area.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | Don Babwin, Associated Press
Oprah Winfrey got Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Cormac McCarthy to do the one thing he hates most: talk about his work. "You probably shouldn't be talking about it, you probably should be doing it," the 73-year-old author told Winfrey in a rare TV interview, which aired Tuesday on "The Oprah Winfrey Show."
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | CONNIE KOENENN CONNIE KOENENN..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
How do you get readers hooked? Michael Crichton knows: Just start telling a story. And no matter how complex it's going to get, draw them in with an opening scene as innocent as a blanket of daisies over quicksand.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have found a way to use the language of life itself--the spiral string of DNA curled inside every living cell--to solve a difficult math problem, suggesting that one day a working computer could be crafted in a test tube. USC computer expert Leonard M. Adleman used the genetic code to program an elementary equation into a unique DNA molecule.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | ANGELA ALEISS, Aleiss received a Ph.D. in film history from Columbia University and will begin her appointment this fall as a postdoctoral fellow at UCLA's American Indian Studies Center. and
Calendar has reported from time to time on how minority filmmakers such as Spike Lee, John Singleton and Edward James Olmos have joined the ranks of successful movie directors, while other articles have dealt with the emergence of blacks on American prime-time television. However, as a June 15 Counterpunch ("Latinos Are Imprisoned by TV's Color Barrier, Too") correctly noted, even with these recent achievements, the racial barrier is still very much entrenched in the entertainment industry.
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