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BUSINESS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Santa Fe Pacific Corp. plans to reduce employment on its railroad by 2,700 jobs over five years, officials of the company said. The reductions will take place through job buyouts, attrition and possible layoffs and will affect both union and white-collar workers, according to a spokesman for Chicago-based Santa Fe. The cuts would likely affect Santa Fe Railway across its 11,500-mile system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 17, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Fe railroad helped build California a century ago. Now, as a takeover fight rages for Santa Fe, California stands as both a valuable prize and a big hurdle for the two companies seeking control. Santa Fe Pacific Corp. agreed this summer to be acquired by Burlington Northern in a stock swap valued at $2.5 billion. But early this month, Union Pacific Corp. weighed in with a surprise $3.3-billion rival offer. For Burlington, a Ft.
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BUSINESS
July 18, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Santa Fe Railway announced today that it is cutting its staff by about 450 people, from non-union clerical workers to upper-level management, as part of a plan to streamline operations. "In order to survive and prosper in today's transportation environment, it is necessary that we provide high-quality service at competitive prices. We must reduce our ongoing expenses if we are to accomplish that," Michael R. Haverty, company president, said in a news release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
The Rail Age is about to return to this old whistle stop. For 22 years, the historic Santa Fe rail depot here, four blocks west of the city's quaint traffic circle, has played host only to vagrants. Horns blaring, freight and passenger trains streak by now-empty packinghouses.
REAL ESTATE
February 17, 1985 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Octogenarians rarely get hired for new jobs, but here's one that is not only about to play an important role in business but will also look more handsome than ever before. It is the dilapidated building at 123-125 Santa Fe Ave., which will soon be turned into the Santa Fe Law Plaza, a stylish office building for attorneys just half a mile from the courts in downtown Los Angeles. The building was constructed about the turn of the century as a warehouse and fruit-packing plant.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Fe railroad helped build California a century ago. Now, as a takeover fight rages for Santa Fe, California stands as both a valuable prize and a big hurdle for the two companies seeking control. Santa Fe Pacific Corp. agreed this summer to be acquired by Burlington Northern in a stock swap valued at $2.5 billion. But early this month, Union Pacific Corp. weighed in with a surprise $3.3-billion rival offer. For Burlington, a Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three people were killed in just over a day when struck by trains in the North County, reviving concerns about rail safety sparked by a spate of previous deaths along the coastal tracks. One of the latest deaths may have been a suicide. A bicyclist who apparently tried to outrun a train at a crossing was struck and killed at 7:56 p.m. Thursday in Carlsbad by a northbound Amtrak San Diegan, railroad personnel and police said.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1989 | From United Press International
Railroad workers have ratified an agreement with the Santa Fe Railway that authorizes a reduction in the size of some freight train crews, the carrier announced Monday. The agreement with the United Transportation Union on the Coast Lines of Santa Fe Railway covers operations in California, Arizona and New Mexico. A similar agreement is under consideration by UTU members on the railway's Texas Lines. "This agreement covers 30% of Santa Fe's conductors, trainmen and yardmen," the railway said.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1990 | Associated Press
Santa Fe Railway will sell 730 miles of track in the Southwest to privately held Orient Railcorp. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The three segments of track are in Oklahoma and Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1993
Orange County commuters will have to wait a little longer for expanded rail service. The addition of two trains in December between Oceanside and Los Angeles with stops in Orange County has been postponed until May, because of a dispute with Santa Fe Railroad over track maintenance, county transit officials said. The Orange County Transportation Authority announced the delay to give commuters time to make other arrangements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Santa Fe Railway on Tuesday sold 47 miles of rail line to the Orange County Transportation Authority for use as commuter lines. The sale was part of a $148-million sale of 100 miles of rail by Santa Fe to three Southern California transportation agencies. OCTA bought the railway's Olive line, which runs from Atwood to Orange, and the Orange County portion of the San Diego line, from Fullerton to San Clemente.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1992 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 23-year-old Camp Pendleton Marine became the fourth person in a month to be struck and killed by a train in North County when a southbound Amtrak train hit him Friday evening as he walked along the tracks in Leucadia. Sheriff's deputies found the body of Cpl. John Penwell in the 1100 block of Old Highway 101 between the Santa Fe Railway tracks and Vulcan Avenue. He had been struck about 9:20 p.m. Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three people were killed in just over a day when struck by trains in the North County, reviving concerns about rail safety sparked by a spate of previous deaths along the coastal tracks. One of the latest deaths may have been a suicide. A bicyclist who apparently tried to outrun a train at a crossing was struck and killed at 7:56 p.m. Thursday in Carlsbad by a northbound Amtrak San Diegan, railroad personnel and police said.
OPINION
June 28, 1992
Gather officials of five counties and representatives of a powerful business force around a bargaining table and what can you expect? Usually stalemate, given the often competing interests of the public and private sectors. True to form, that's what happened for years as transportation officials from Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties knocked heads with Santa Fe Railway over the proposed purchase of 336 miles of track.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending three years of bare-knuckle back-room negotiation, regional transportation officials agreed Thursday to buy 336 miles of track from the Santa Fe railroad needed for several vital trolley and commuter lines. The $500-million deal will, within three years, create the nation's sixth-largest commuter railroad and bring rail transit to large portions of Southern California that otherwise would probably never see such service.
NEWS
February 14, 1985
State officials have rejected a city grant request for $2 million to purchase the abandoned Santa Fe Railway right of way between Herondo Street and Gould Avenue. Because of limited funding, the state will not fund any railroad right-of-way acquisitions in the coming fiscal year, according to a city report released this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1992
Federal, state and Santa Fe Railway officials Tuesday tried to determine the cause of a train-switching accident in Escondido in which a conductor was killed. Herbert C. Blanthorne, 58, was killed instantly when he fell beneath the cars being switched from one track to another at 1:05 p.m. Monday, Santa Fe spokesman Mike Martin said. A brakeman and an engineer helping Blanthorne switch the cars did not see the accident, Martin said.
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