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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2010 | Shelby Grad, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Thousands of people from around the Los Angeles area reported feeling a series of small earthquakes that struck the Santa Monica Bay on Monday. A magnitude 3.7 quake that hit about four miles off Hermosa Beach around 5 p.m. brought more than 3,000 responses to the U.S. Geological Survey's "Did You Feel It?" survey site.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Michael Bay, the "Transformers" film series producer, has sold his estate in Bel-Air for $11.45 million. The three-story clean-lined contemporary was designed by the late Jack Warner, whose architectural firm worked on the Bel-Air Country Club. The 7,919-square-foot, museum-like house features high ceilings, a family room with a bar, library, a home theater, a wine cellar, four fireplaces, four bedrooms and six bathrooms. The nearly one-acre promontory has views that encompass the Los Angeles Basin, Mt. Baldy and Santa Monica Bay.  The site includes a swimming pool and mature trees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1985
I was disturbed to read the article by Willard Bascom, "Santa Monica Bay On The Mend." How wonderful if true! But this is not at all possible when the Hyperion treatment plant at El Segundo is being asked to process four times the sewage it was built to handle! Since Bascom represents the cities that do the polluting, it is not difficult to understand his attitude on the necessity of cleaning up the mess. I wonder, when was the last time he swam in Santa Monica Bay?
OPINION
December 26, 2012 | By Matthew King
I told myself I had only come to look at the surf, but who was I kidding? Powerful head-high waves reeled off the rock jetty that marks the northern end of Manhattan Beach's El Porto surf break. A light but steady drizzle had fallen hours earlier; now an offshore breeze groomed the sea like corduroy. In my car, perched along the bluff, I gazed longingly at the half a dozen surfers circling in the lineup, all jockeying to latch onto a feathering wave. Wave riders in L.A. welcome winter storms, which open a narrow window of good surf created by strong swells, favorable winds and new sandbars.
OPINION
December 10, 2010 | By Mark Gold
For more than half a century, beachgoers have had their views of the Santa Monica Bay disturbed on a near-daily basis. What should be a pristine panorama of sky, sunlight and surf is interrupted by massive tankers unloading crude oil, which is then transported through a pipeline to the Chevron refinery in El Segundo. About 350 tankers each year offload more than 4 billion gallons of crude oil at the bay's offshore mooring. Now, Chevron's lease on state lands that house the offshore marine oil terminal is up for renewal.
MAGAZINE
August 17, 1986 | JILL STEWART, Jill Stewart is a Times staff writer.
A conversation with marine biologist Rimmon C. Fay, 57, owner of a marine specimen supply firm, an ex-member of the state Coastal Commission and a leader in the fight against pollution in Santa Monica Bay. Los Angeles officials have agreed to spend $2.3 billion to improve treatment of toxin-laden sewage the city dumps in the bay, which is being considered for the federal Superfund cleanup list. Q: You were one of the first marine biologists to explore the waters of Santa Monica Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
You have to be a scuba diver to see the difference, but areas of Santa Monica Bay that were historically fouled by sewage discharges are making a strong comeback. The new State of the Bay report notes the revival of bottom-dwelling marine life in the wake of treatment upgrades at the two big wastewater plants that empty into the bay several miles from shore. Diver surveys have documented sea animals and plants on the sea floor "where really it was barren before," said Shelley Luce, executive director of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission, which issues the report every five years.
NEWS
October 23, 1987
About 2.7 million gallons of partially treated sewage overflowed into Ballona Creek and reached Santa Monica Bay during last night's rains, City of Los Angeles sanitation officials said. County health officials began this morning to post signs on a vast stretch of beach from Long Beach to the Ventura County line warning that the water could contain unsafe levels of bacteria.
OPINION
December 25, 1994
We were surprised to read state Sen. Tom Hayden's assertion in "Sacrificing the Bay for Little Gain" (Commentary, Dec. 13) that there is dissension among environmental groups over the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project's action plan. While different environmental groups may have different strategies, we stand united in the pursuit of our ultimate goal: a cleaner and healthier Santa Monica Bay. Certainly the plan alone will not clean up our ocean. Under the National Estuary Program, the process required consensus among dischargers, regulators, agencies and environmentalists in the development of a plan to restore our bay. Yes, we want to strengthen the plan and to make sure that all its voluntary measures are implemented.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
Mathis Chazanov wrote an excellent story on flood control. In regard to Ballona Creek, work on the project to enclose the creek in concrete boxes began in the mid-1930s after a terrible flood on New Year's, 1932, when most of the Westside was cut off by the raging creek. Work was done covering the creek from near Cochran Street east to La Brea and then north on La Brea to Olympic. Water runs freely under those streets. The Army Corps of Engineers did the planning and supervision of this important project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The long-time public face of Heal the Bay, one of California's leading and most influential environmental advocacy groups, is stepping down after nearly a quarter of a century with the Santa Monica-based nonprofit. Mark Gold, president of the environmental group focused on the health of Santa Monica Bay and waters up and down the West Coast, is leaving to accept a position as associate director of the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, where he has taught as an adjunct professor and serves on its board.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione
This ornate villa overlooking Malaga Cove in Palos Verdes Estates feels like it could be in Italy. But views of Santa Monica Bay and points north, and on clear days, the San Gabriel Mountains and downtown Los Angeles, belie that. Yet the views alone don't account for the $10.9-million price tag. The home's eye-popping extravagance begins with a $1.7-million foundation and continues from the ground up. Marble mosaic floors and 300-year-old terra-cotta pavers from France stand atop that base — and that's just what's underfoot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
The earthquake-triggered tsunami that thrashed California's coast Friday morning, killing one person, caused at least $50 million in damage, experts said Saturday. Lori Dengler, a geology professor and director of the Humboldt Earthquake Education Center at Humboldt State, said the damage estimates were preliminary — and were likely to rise. "It's going to go up," Dengler said. "How far up, I'm not going to predict. This is an expensive event for California. " Officials at harbors up and down the coastline spent Saturday assessing damage from Friday's ocean surge.
OPINION
December 10, 2010 | By Mark Gold
For more than half a century, beachgoers have had their views of the Santa Monica Bay disturbed on a near-daily basis. What should be a pristine panorama of sky, sunlight and surf is interrupted by massive tankers unloading crude oil, which is then transported through a pipeline to the Chevron refinery in El Segundo. About 350 tankers each year offload more than 4 billion gallons of crude oil at the bay's offshore mooring. Now, Chevron's lease on state lands that house the offshore marine oil terminal is up for renewal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
For nearly a century, oil tankers from around the globe have docked just off the shore of El Segundo to pump crude into one of the largest refineries on the West Coast. Now, the Chevron Corp. is asking the state for an additional 30 years. The California State Lands Commission is expected to vote Friday on an agreement that would charge the oil company a base rent of $1.3 million a year to lease the state-controlled tidelands for its El Segundo Offshore Marine Oil Terminal through 2040.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2010 | Shelby Grad, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Thousands of people from around the Los Angeles area reported feeling a series of small earthquakes that struck the Santa Monica Bay on Monday. A magnitude 3.7 quake that hit about four miles off Hermosa Beach around 5 p.m. brought more than 3,000 responses to the U.S. Geological Survey's "Did You Feel It?" survey site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
You have to be a scuba diver to see the difference, but areas of Santa Monica Bay that were historically fouled by sewage discharges are making a strong comeback. The new State of the Bay report notes the revival of bottom-dwelling marine life in the wake of treatment upgrades at the two big wastewater plants that empty into the bay several miles from shore. Diver surveys have documented sea animals and plants on the sea floor "where really it was barren before," said Shelley Luce, executive director of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission, which issues the report every five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2009 | Baxter Holmes
Lifeguard Andrew Greger was making a routine training dive off the Santa Monica coast three weeks ago when something in the water caught his eye. At the bottom of the ocean, about two miles north of the Santa Monica Pier, he found a massive ship's anchor covered in rust, seaweed and sea-floor growth. Greger knew the area had been a major shipping port a century ago. But he was surprised to find the anchor in such good condition. "It's not every day you find something like that," said Greger, a rescue boat captain with the Los Angeles County Fire Department Lifeguard Division.
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