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Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992
The Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project voted this week to support full secondary treatment for all sewage discharged into Santa Monica Bay, a move hailed by environmentalists and lawmakers. The project's management committee passed a resolution calling for the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts to upgrade its largest waste-water treatment facility, the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, to the full secondary treatment requirements of the Clean Water Act.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2003 | Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Santa Monica Bay, one of the most treasured resources in Southern California, is also one of the most trashed. Thousands of tons of cigarette butts, foam cups, oil residue and other detritus tossed on city streets ultimately wend their way to the bay, contaminating beaches and waters used by 50 million swimmers, surfers and anglers every year. During the rainy season, when the toxic runoff to the beach is at its height, swimmers are urged not to brave the sullied waves for days after any storm.
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NEWS
June 2, 1994
The public may comment at two public hearings today on a five-year plan to clean up Santa Monica Bay, part of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project. The project, which is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, affects an area from the Ventura County line to Point Fermin. The draft plan, released in April, identifies 73 priority actions that would cost an estimated $67 million. The first hearing will be at 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-delayed plan to clean up Santa Monica Bay is getting its first infusion of cash for an array of projects--from reducing trash and toxic substances to replanting vanishing kelp forests. The first installment of $3.9 million in state park bond funds will accelerate the cleanup of the bay, one of the nation's most troubled coastal waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995
UNDERSEA ADVENTURE: Ever wonder what marine life exists in the Santa Monica Bay--alongside the trash and other pollutants, that is? UCLA's new Ocean Discovery Center, which officials unveiled on Wednesday, will soon be there to provide the answers. The center, which opens to the public in January, will be housed in a building under the Santa Monica Pier. It will feature a 3,000-gallon fish tank standing 6 feet tall and extending 14 feet along the length of one wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997
A coalition of environmental and fishing groups joined state legislators on the Santa Monica Pier on Wednesday to voice support for a package of 30 coastal protection bills coming before this year's session of the Legislature. Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar) and actor Ted Danson, who is president of the American Oceans Campaign, urged the Legislature to pass the "Healthy Coast" legislative agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1992 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On summer evenings after returning home from work, environmental lawyer Bob Sulnick and several of his Santa Monica Canyon neighbors used to tramp down to the beach for some body surfing. Today, the group that called itself the Dolphin Club is disbanded, done in by concern about the pollutants that storm drains and sewer lines pour into Santa Monica Bay. "After we started finding out what was going on in the bay, it was a real shock, let me tell you," said Sulnick, 49. "We all stopped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2003 | Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Santa Monica Bay, one of the most treasured resources in Southern California, is also one of the most trashed. Thousands of tons of cigarette butts, foam cups, oil residue and other detritus tossed on city streets ultimately wend their way to the bay, contaminating beaches and waters used by 50 million swimmers, surfers and anglers every year. During the rainy season, when the toxic runoff to the beach is at its height, swimmers are urged not to brave the sullied waves for days after any storm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-delayed plan to clean up Santa Monica Bay is getting its first infusion of cash for an array of projects--from reducing trash and toxic substances to replanting vanishing kelp forests. The first installment of $3.9 million in state park bond funds will accelerate the cleanup of the bay, one of the nation's most troubled coastal waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a year of heated debate, proposals and subcommittee meetings, the unveiling was at hand. The Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project was ready to reveal how it would keep swimmers away from potentially unhealthful storm drain runoff. As television cameras rolled at the news conference on the beach in Pacific Palisades last Wednesday, the project unveiled--a batch of signs. Each bore an 11-word message--"Caution! Storm Drain: Water and Surf May be Contaminated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997
A coalition of environmental and fishing groups joined state legislators on the Santa Monica Pier on Wednesday to voice support for a package of 30 coastal protection bills coming before this year's session of the Legislature. Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar) and actor Ted Danson, who is president of the American Oceans Campaign, urged the Legislature to pass the "Healthy Coast" legislative agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995
UNDERSEA ADVENTURE: Ever wonder what marine life exists in the Santa Monica Bay--alongside the trash and other pollutants, that is? UCLA's new Ocean Discovery Center, which officials unveiled on Wednesday, will soon be there to provide the answers. The center, which opens to the public in January, will be housed in a building under the Santa Monica Pier. It will feature a 3,000-gallon fish tank standing 6 feet tall and extending 14 feet along the length of one wall.
NEWS
June 2, 1994
The public may comment at two public hearings today on a five-year plan to clean up Santa Monica Bay, part of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project. The project, which is administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, affects an area from the Ventura County line to Point Fermin. The draft plan, released in April, identifies 73 priority actions that would cost an estimated $67 million. The first hearing will be at 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1992 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On summer evenings after returning home from work, environmental lawyer Bob Sulnick and several of his Santa Monica Canyon neighbors used to tramp down to the beach for some body surfing. Today, the group that called itself the Dolphin Club is disbanded, done in by concern about the pollutants that storm drains and sewer lines pour into Santa Monica Bay. "After we started finding out what was going on in the bay, it was a real shock, let me tell you," said Sulnick, 49. "We all stopped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992
The Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project voted this week to support full secondary treatment for all sewage discharged into Santa Monica Bay, a move hailed by environmentalists and lawmakers. The project's management committee passed a resolution calling for the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts to upgrade its largest waste-water treatment facility, the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, to the full secondary treatment requirements of the Clean Water Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a year of heated debate, proposals and subcommittee meetings, the unveiling was at hand. The Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project was ready to reveal how it would keep swimmers away from potentially unhealthful storm drain runoff. As television cameras rolled at the news conference on the beach in Pacific Palisades last Wednesday, the project unveiled--a batch of signs. Each bore an 11-word message--"Caution! Storm Drain: Water and Surf May be Contaminated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among Santa Monica Bay regulars, the stories have circulated for at least a decade: Five lifeguards working near Santa Monica Pier get cancer. A world-class distance swimmer training off Pacific Palisades comes down with severe stomach flu. Surfers at several beaches complain of rashes and sinus infections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1998
Two groups dedicated to cleaning up Santa Monica Bay will showcase environmentally friendly boating practices at a fair today. Sponsors Santa Monica BayKeepers and the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project hope the Clean Boating Fair will teach boaters to use environmentally safe methods while on the water, said Kris Haddad of the BayKeepers. The fair will be held from noon to 5 p.m. at Burton Chace Park. Those wishing to have their boats inspected are asked to dock at the park's guest docks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among Santa Monica Bay regulars, the stories have circulated for at least a decade: Five lifeguards working near Santa Monica Pier get cancer. A world-class distance swimmer training off Pacific Palisades comes down with severe stomach flu. Surfers at several beaches complain of rashes and sinus infections.
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