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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1988
The Santa Monica City Council on Tuesday elected third-term Councilman Dennis Zane as the city's mayor. Zane, a member of the city's liberal Santa Monicans for Renters' Rights political faction, was nominated by Councilman David Finkel and elected by a unanimous 7-0 vote to serve a two-year term as mayor. The 41-year-old former schoolteacher succeeds fellow Santa Monicans for Renters' Rights member James Conn, who did not seek reelection to the council, as mayor.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Santa Monica has purchased most of the 15-acre home of Rand Corp. for $53 million as part of an ambitious plan to enlarge the beachfront town's Civic Center with new housing, office space and parks. The famed think tank will retain a four-acre portion of the site across from the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium and build a five-story headquarters with proceeds from the land sale.
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NEWS
February 21, 1989
HOW TO PARTICIPATE 1. Register with the city and sign a form pledging to obey computer laws and releasing the city from any liability. 2. The city issues each participant a user identification number and a 15-page instruction manual. The resident chooses a password. 3. Residents can use any kind of home computer, or ones set up in public centers, to access the system and need no special software--merely a modem to connect the computer with the city system by telephone. 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997
Kay Ostberg, the newly appointed executive director of the Ocean Park Community Center, believes welfare reform will greatly increase the number of homeless individuals, now estimated at 5,000, in the city. "Our greatest challenge will be simply to meet that need," she said. Ostberg also wants to help runaway adolescents. No city program targets their needs, she said. Ostberg previously was deputy executive director of the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of warring with itself, the city of Santa Monica appears to be on the brink of adopting a grand plan for managing its large and unruly homeless population. One of the nation's most liberal city councils, forced into action by mounting complaints over a growing crime rate, unusable parks and a panhandler on every corner, is trying to figure out where to strike the balance between compassion for the homeless and the safety of everyone else.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frances Finnen--89 years old and hard of hearing, but as feisty as they come--had stopped her shopping cart in the bakery section at Vons near her Santa Monica home last March when a young, "not too clean" man approached and asked, innocuously enough, "Where's the mayonnaise?" As Finnen raised her arm to point, Finnen testified in court last week, the man shoved a pair of scissors into her side, grabbed her purse and ran.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Santa Monica has purchased most of the 15-acre home of Rand Corp. for $53 million as part of an ambitious plan to enlarge the beachfront town's Civic Center with new housing, office space and parks. The famed think tank will retain a four-acre portion of the site across from the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium and build a five-story headquarters with proceeds from the land sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1997
Kay Ostberg, the newly appointed executive director of the Ocean Park Community Center, believes welfare reform will greatly increase the number of homeless individuals, now estimated at 5,000, in the city. "Our greatest challenge will be simply to meet that need," she said. Ostberg also wants to help runaway adolescents. No city program targets their needs, she said. Ostberg previously was deputy executive director of the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Santa Monica's electronics wizard, Ken Phillips, did not expect to be overwhelmed by potential users demanding access to a new computer network at City Hall. A couple of queries a day would probably trickle in, he thought. It's a good thing Phillips knows computers better than he predicts human curiosity. Within two days of the innovative network's debut, more than 250 people were clamoring to sign on.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Santa Monica is officially "on line." Starting today, residents can sign on to their personal computers and, in effect, talk to City Hall. Declaring itself "the city of the future," Santa Monica has activated a new computer network that puts a storehouse of information--ranging from where to get a parking permit to what books are checked out of the local library--at the fingertips of city residents with access to a computer keyboard.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of warring with itself, the city of Santa Monica appears to be on the brink of adopting a grand plan for managing its large and unruly homeless population. One of the nation's most liberal city councils, forced into action by mounting complaints over a growing crime rate, unusable parks and a panhandler on every corner, is trying to figure out where to strike the balance between compassion for the homeless and the safety of everyone else.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frances Finnen--89 years old and hard of hearing, but as feisty as they come--had stopped her shopping cart in the bakery section at Vons near her Santa Monica home last March when a young, "not too clean" man approached and asked, innocuously enough, "Where's the mayonnaise?" As Finnen raised her arm to point, Finnen testified in court last week, the man shoved a pair of scissors into her side, grabbed her purse and ran.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Santa Monica's electronics wizard, Ken Phillips, did not expect to be overwhelmed by potential users demanding access to a new computer network at City Hall. A couple of queries a day would probably trickle in, he thought. It's a good thing Phillips knows computers better than he predicts human curiosity. Within two days of the innovative network's debut, more than 250 people were clamoring to sign on.
NEWS
February 21, 1989
HOW TO PARTICIPATE 1. Register with the city and sign a form pledging to obey computer laws and releasing the city from any liability. 2. The city issues each participant a user identification number and a 15-page instruction manual. The resident chooses a password. 3. Residents can use any kind of home computer, or ones set up in public centers, to access the system and need no special software--merely a modem to connect the computer with the city system by telephone. 4.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Santa Monica is officially "on line." Starting today, residents can sign on to their personal computers and, in effect, talk to City Hall. Declaring itself "the city of the future," Santa Monica has activated a new computer network that puts a storehouse of information--ranging from where to get a parking permit to what books are checked out of the local library--at the fingertips of city residents with access to a computer keyboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1988
The Santa Monica City Council on Tuesday elected third-term Councilman Dennis Zane as the city's mayor. Zane, a member of the city's liberal Santa Monicans for Renters' Rights political faction, was nominated by Councilman David Finkel and elected by a unanimous 7-0 vote to serve a two-year term as mayor. The 41-year-old former schoolteacher succeeds fellow Santa Monicans for Renters' Rights member James Conn, who did not seek reelection to the council, as mayor.
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