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Santa Monica Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON and BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Santa Monica City Council approved a long-debated "living wage" ordinance early Wednesday that would raise the hourly minimum pay to $10.50 for workers at an estimated 40 large businesses in the city's popular beachfront and downtown districts. Backers rejoiced over what experts say is a national precedent involving such a municipally approved wage increase for private industry and said the move will help hundreds of workers support their families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica homeowners soon may be asked to take a big step for those who can't walk. In what would be the first such rules in the nation, Santa Monica officials are considering a proposal to require that all privately built new homes and those undergoing major remodeling have a wheelchair ramp entry, wide interior hallways and at least one handicapped-accessible bathroom.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999
Just weeks after Rent Control Board officials celebrated a U.S. Supreme Court move that bolstered their power, a Los Angeles Superior judge has mandated that the board relinquish some of its authority. Judge Hugh Gardner III ruled that the state's Costa-Hawkins Act, which allows landlords to raise controlled apartment rents to market rates after a tenant moves out voluntarily, supersedes the board's authority to dispute the validity of rent increases in such cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica's landmark law regulating how businesses rehire workers laid off due to the post-Sept. 11 tourism slump is being praised by some as patriotic--and condemned by others as un-American. City Council members voted 4 to 3 Tuesday to require large firms operating in popular tourist and downtown areas to offer the jobs to former employees first before hiring new workers once the economy improves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How do you spell relief for women waiting in a queue to use the loo? M-E-N. Under a public restroom law that won preliminary approval this week from the Santa Monica City Council, women will be entitled to use the men's room if the line at the ladies' room is more than three deep. If the situation is reversed--although it virtually never is--men can use the women's restroom. Otherwise, women are women and men are men in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fortunetellers in Santa Monica, banished for decades to the Santa Monica Pier, can soon set up shop along a portion of Ocean Front Walk, the tourist-heavy beachside path that historically has been off-limits to soothsayers. This week, the City Council unanimously passed an interim ordinance to allow fortunetellers to operate there from beachside storefronts, not from sidewalk tables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1997
After listening to views of more than 40 street performers and merchants, the City Council is scheduled to resume discussion next week on a controversial ordinance regulating street performers. "Street performers are the heart and soul of the [Third Street] Promenade," said Mayor Pam O'Connor. "They're what sets it apart from a shopping mall. They lure people here." The proposed ordinance calls for limits on performers' noise levels and on where they can set up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica teen-agers are about to be grounded. But only late at night and for their own good, said the five members of the Santa Monica City Council who have asked the city's lawyers to write up a curfew law. As it is envisioned, the curfew law would ban minors from hanging around on the streets after 10 p.m. on weeknights and after 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. There are notable exceptions: Youths would be permitted out and about with their parents or other adult guardians.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | JEFF KRAMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The homeless and their advocates were left out in the cold this week when the Santa Monica City Council backed a plan to close Palisades Park at night, ostensibly to reduce drug traffic there. By a 5-2 vote Monday, the council ordered the city attorney's office to draft an ordinance to close the cliff-top park from midnight to 5 a.m., dealing a harsh blow to the many people who sleep there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1992 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica this week ended its City Hall-lawn meal program for the homeless and began enforcing a new ordinance outlawing living in public places. The two events mark a major turning point in the way this city manages its homeless problem. On Monday, the meals program quietly moved to three indoor sites where homeless people can also obtain other services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica approved its controversial living wage law last month, but the fight over the measure continues. In fact, the fight is growing more heated with pro-business and pro-labor forces each accusing the other of unfair tactics. A business-backed group is collecting signatures to place a referendum on the ballot that would allow voters to decide whether the law will take effect next summer as planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Irvine may join a handful of California cities that have passed controversial campaign and ethics rules intended to prevent elected city officials from using their offices to enrich themselves. The proposed ordinance would restrict officials from accepting campaign donations, gifts or jobs from anyone with a major municipal contract or project that required a City Council vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of $10.50 minimum hourly pay at Santa Monica's bigger beach-area businesses said Monday that they will seek a public referendum in May to overturn that so-called living wage ordinance. That controversial wage hike was approved 5 to 1 last month by the City Council, which is expected to vote for final passage tonight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 18, Vivian Rothstein got her first taste of a protest for social change. She was a UC Berkeley student and one of 500 people on trial in a 1964 mass protest against race-based employment discrimination at San Francisco car dealerships. Her court-appointed lawyer was an African American who as a soldier helped liberate Berlin, the city her Jewish parents had fled in 1933. His defense, Rothstein says, drew a parallel between discriminatory laws in Nazi Germany and those in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON and BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Santa Monica City Council approved a long-debated "living wage" ordinance early Wednesday that would raise the hourly minimum pay to $10.50 for workers at an estimated 40 large businesses in the city's popular beachfront and downtown districts. Backers rejoiced over what experts say is a national precedent involving such a municipally approved wage increase for private industry and said the move will help hundreds of workers support their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica City Council has unexpectedly ordered its staff to draft a "living wage ordinance" that would require significantly higher pay for many workers at large businesses in the city's coastal tourism zone. The 5-2 vote after midnight Wednesday morning came four months after Santa Monica voters overwhelmingly defeated a hotel-backed initiative, Proposition KK, which would have blocked such an ordinance. Council members said they hoped to vote on the new law by early June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Baseball has its seventh-inning stretch. Buckingham Palace has its changing of the guard. And now, Santa Monica has its street performer shuffle. An emergency ordinance passed by the seaside city this week requires sidewalk entertainers and vendors to stand 40 feet apart, and to pack up and move 120 feet every two hours while working the Third Street Promenade or Santa Monica Pier, the city's most famous tourist attractions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Santa Monica locals know Jerry Rubin as the suntanned and sandaled man with a bumper sticker and a hunger strike for nearly every liberal cause. This year, he's run an unusual campaign for Santa Monica City Council by refusing donations, volunteers and endorsements and asking for votes "only if you think I deserve it." The one thing Rubin demands, however, is that the phrase "peace activist" appear under his name on the November ballot.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2000 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city boasting one of Southern California's hottest office markets is about to adopt a measure that real estate developers predict will dramatically slow the pace of commercial construction. Santa Monica's new guidelines reduce the size of new buildings subject to extensive Planning Commission and public review to 7,500 square feet in most of the city's commercial districts. The old cut-off was 30,000 square feet, already under the Los Angeles standard of 40,000 square feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000
Bank of America and Wells Fargo announced Thursday that ATM service is being restored to non-account-holders in Santa Monica this week after both banks blocked such use for nearly a year to protest a city ordinance designed to stop ATM fees. Service was scheduled to be restored at 12:01 a.m. today at 21 Bank of America automated teller machines. Wells Fargo restored service in the 12 Santa Monica machines at 6 a.m. Thursday.
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