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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years, Jay Fiondella has sat in his landmark Santa Monica eatery Chez Jay and looked out at Ocean Avenue. He cannot remember all the faces of those who have gotten hurt trying to cross it. Last Monday, he learned from a police officer that the latest victim was his mother, 89-year-old Alice Fiondella. A few hundred feet from her son's eatery, she was struck by a car as she walked in an Ocean Avenue crosswalk that locals say has long needed a signal light.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
The city's Big Blue Bus system has been ranked the best in the country by the American Public Transit Assn., marking the fourth time the system has won the top honor. Santa Monica Transportation Director John Catoe accepted the award earlier this week at the transit association's annual convention in San Francisco. General Manager Stephanie Negriff credited the honor to expanded routes, increased nighttime and weekend service and a new bus card system that makes paying fares easier.
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NEWS
June 12, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The streets are quiet, and the low, morning sun is jabbing between the long building shadows in Santa Monica's seaside, downtown business district. Just now, the main attraction is not the trendy boutiques or cafes, but the transit buses lumbering from stop to stop, scooping up small knots of work- and school-bound passengers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1998
Representatives of the city's municipal bus company will discuss proposed changes in some of its Westside routes at a public meeting Saturday. Big Blue Bus officials hope that changes to Lines 8 and 12 and the creation of Line 4 will improve service to riders, said company spokesman Cynthia Gibson. Beginning Sept. 13, the Big Blue Bus proposes that the new Line 4, now a segment of Line 8, will run from 4th Street and Santa Monica Boulevard to 26th Street and San Vicente Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996
After years of debating how to slow traffic in a residential neighborhood, the Santa Monica City Council approved a traffic plan Tuesday that includes installation of more than 80 speed bumps and two dozen stop signs. The Sunset Park traffic plan, passed on a 5-0 vote, calls for stop signs, traffic signal synchronization, lane "chokers" to narrow intersections, and long, low speed bumps to slow the traffic in the southeast corner of Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997
Proposed increases in Santa Monica bus service, including the phasing in of 67 new buses over the next nine months, will be discussed at a public meeting today. The 3 p.m. meeting at the Ken Edwards Center, 1527 4th St., will also consider a scheduled one-third increase in bus service over the next several years, bus company spokeswoman Cynthia Gibson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
In an attempt to improve the flow of traffic in downtown Santa Monica, Fifth Street will be converted from one-way to two-way traffic beginning next week, a city official said Wednesday. Weather permitting, work to change traffic signals, street striping and signage on Fifth Street between Wilshire Boulevard and Colorado Avenue will be done overnight on Nov. 18, said Ron Fuchiwaki, parking and traffic engineer for Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997
Santa Monica officials say they plan to spend $22 million on improving public transportation, parks and parking structures. City Finance Director Mike Dennis said the money will come from a federal transportation grant, Metropolitan Transportation Authority funds and money from high tax receipts. The additional spending is part of the proposed $277.7-million budget for 1997-98. The City Council was expected to approve the budget Tuesday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997
Santa Monica officials clambered aboard the city's new electric buses Monday morning as the first three battery-operated public transportation vehicles were rolled out during a beach boardwalk parade. The 26-foot-long shuttles hummed quietly as city officials took a spin in the new vehicles, which can operate for 10 hours before needing to be recharged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
The Santa Monica City Council voted 5 to 1 this week to move forward with a master bicycle plan that would transform the city into a haven for cyclists and, some say, a hassle for residents. The council approved environmental review of the plan despite strong opposition from residents who fear that their quality of life could be shattered by packs of weekend cyclists in quiet neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998
The city is taking steps to free up more parking along Main Street by starting free shuttle service and extending the hours of operation for parking meters. The changes encourage Main Street retail employees to use a beach parking lot to open up spaces for shoppers and tourists, said planning manager Karen Ginsberg. The shuttle, which will run between the parking lot south of the pier and the corner of Ocean Park Boulevard and Ashland Avenue, will begin July 3 and end Labor Day weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1997
The Santa Monica City Council has approved a one-year pilot program for pedicabs along Main Street. The three-wheeled pedaled vehicles, which carry one operator and two passengers, are scheduled to begin operating next spring using existing bicycle paths along the cafe- and boutique-lined street. "From an environmental perspective, pedicabs increase the mix of nonpolluting travel modes," said Michael Feinstein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1997
In an attempt to improve the flow of traffic in downtown Santa Monica, Fifth Street will be converted from one-way to two-way traffic beginning next week, a city official said Wednesday. Weather permitting, work to change traffic signals, street striping and signage on Fifth Street between Wilshire Boulevard and Colorado Avenue will be done overnight on Nov. 18, said Ron Fuchiwaki, parking and traffic engineer for Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day it was there. The next day it was gone. Somebody had crossed out the crosswalk in front of Norman Merrill's apartment in Santa Monica. "They just disappeared," Merrill said of the glistening pedestrian crossing lines that had stretched across Ocean Avenue at its intersection with Strand Street. "Workmen came in and ground them out of the pavement."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997
Santa Monica officials say they plan to spend $22 million on improving public transportation, parks and parking structures. City Finance Director Mike Dennis said the money will come from a federal transportation grant, Metropolitan Transportation Authority funds and money from high tax receipts. The additional spending is part of the proposed $277.7-million budget for 1997-98. The City Council was expected to approve the budget Tuesday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997
Relaxing at the Santa Monica Pier is about to become less frustrating. Reacting to an increase in traffic around the pier, Santa Monica Mayor Pam O'Connor and other city officials are set to introduce a free pier/beach shuttle program today that will provide an alternative parking location for weekend visitors. "We wanted to create convenient and easy access to parking for people visiting the Santa Monica Pier," O'Connor said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1998
The city is taking steps to free up more parking along Main Street by starting free shuttle service and extending the hours of operation for parking meters. The changes encourage Main Street retail employees to use a beach parking lot to open up spaces for shoppers and tourists, said planning manager Karen Ginsberg. The shuttle, which will run between the parking lot south of the pier and the corner of Ocean Park Boulevard and Ashland Avenue, will begin July 3 and end Labor Day weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997
Santa Monica officials clambered aboard the city's new electric buses Monday morning as the first three battery-operated public transportation vehicles were rolled out during a beach boardwalk parade. The 26-foot-long shuttles hummed quietly as city officials took a spin in the new vehicles, which can operate for 10 hours before needing to be recharged.
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