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Santa Monica College Of Design Art And Architecture

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With hammers pounding and tools ringing in the background, a group of 45 art students are clustered together on some old, mismatched couches. Shivering slightly from the draft wafting through the warehouse they call home, the students are brainstorming about an upcoming fund-raiser, one which they hope will keep their school afloat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With hammers pounding and tools ringing in the background, a group of 45 art students are clustered together on some old, mismatched couches. Shivering slightly from the draft wafting through the warehouse they call home, the students are brainstorming about an upcoming fund-raiser, one which they hope will keep their school afloat.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1992
Two outdoor stages for theater pieces, performance art, music and dance will be the centerpieces for the 18th Street Arts Complex Open House and Pico Neighborhood Arts Festival on May 31 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Santa Monica. The free event also includes open studio tours and an exhibition by students of the Santa Monica College of Design, Art and Architecture. Information: (310) 453-3711.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1994
Santa Monica College has received a $250,000 unsolicited earthquake recovery grant from the J. Paul Getty Trust, a Santa Monica-based arts foundation. The funds will be used to replace damaged equipment and books in the art department and library, as well as for repairs in the connected Santa Monica College of Design, Art and Architecture. The college suffered $26 million in damage from the Jan. 17 earthquake.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
Dorothy Krovosky paints energetic abstract works at 72. The paintings of Jessica Wood, 19, focus on being a precocious teen-ager. Their fellow students are just as diverse, but their goal is the same: to study and create art. Artworks by 60 students and their professional artist teachers at the fledgling Santa Monica College of Design, Art and Architecture are on display at the Spring St. Gallery. The exhibit celebrates the school's fifth year of offering art education for a $100 annual tuition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1996
As holiday wreaths, reindeer and candy canes pop up on lampposts around Los Angeles, Santa Monica is rolling out its own brand of seasonal decorations. More than 900 hand-painted banners created by local artists and students are being hung around the city in the third year of a controversial art project sponsored by Santa Monica's Central Business District, which spent $60,000 this year on materials for the banners and accompanying garlands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1996
As holiday wreaths, reindeer and candy canes pop up on lampposts around Los Angeles, Santa Monica is rolling out its own brand of seasonal decorations. More than 900 hand-painted banners created by local artists and students are being hung around the city in the third year of a controversial art project sponsored by Santa Monica's Central Business District, which spent $60,000 this year on materials for the banners and accompanying garlands. "It's a very creative city," said Robin Faulk, co-chair of the Central Business District.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica College is launching an ambitious design program that will bring students admitted by portfolio into contact with working architects, graphic designers and other artists in an atmosphere the college hopes will rival the world-renowned Bauhaus.
NEWS
November 20, 1994
Santa is out. Modern art is in. That's the word in the Santa Monica business district, where lampposts will be decorated Tuesday with 225 brilliantly colored holiday banners and five overhead street scrolls created by a team of artists and art students led by Laddie John Dill. The rotund man in red and his tiny reindeer, it seems, have been eclipsed by "original art."
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Of course, we were very, very nervous," said Gerald Bronstein, president of the board of the Wellness Community-Westside. Months ago, supporters planned a silent art auction for Sunday to raise funds for the 10-year-old cancer self-help group, but turmoil in the city during the preceding days made organizers concerned that they would have to cancel. Fortunately, the event had been scheduled from 4 to 6 p.m., which meant that people could get home before the curfew.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Laddie John Dill's dramatic installation, now at the Conejo Valley Art Museum, defies the old notion of art as a precious and more or less immortal commodity that can weather calamities, wars and acts of God. Dill's artwork is of a form that would be directly affected by an earthquake. Of course, that's the point, or at least one of them. The installation in question is, in essence, one of Dill's trademark sandpiles.
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