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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein and Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
A melee outside a Santa Monica Community College Board of Trustees meeting last April that resulted in protesters being hit with pepper spray could have been prevented if college administrators had provided additional police resources and moved the gathering to a larger meeting hall, according to an internal police report obtained by The Times. The 60-page review is based on interviews and video examined by campus police Sgt. Jere Romano, who was not involved in the incident. As many as 100 protesters had gathered for the April 3 meeting on campus, angry over a proposed two-tiered fee plan in which high-demand courses would cost more.
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NEWS
October 17, 1985
Santa Monica Community College must drop 250 classes from its Spring schedule because of state-mandated funding and enrollment changes, according to President Richard L. Moore. The state Community College Board of Governors approved the changes to deal with declining enrollment, a college officials said. Santa Monica College averages about 2,500 classes each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
In a move that further widens the geographic reach of their local arts support, philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad have donated $10 million to create an endowment for programming and arts education at the new performing arts center for Santa Monica College. In honor of the gift, to be announced today at the $45-million arts facility, the center's 499-seat performance space will be named the Broad Stage and its 99-seat theater will be dubbed the Edye Second Space, already dubbed "the Edye" by center leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988
More than 80 people, including several Santa Monica and West Hollywood elected officials, will join in a 36-day "relay fast" starting today in support of a grape boycott led by Cesar Chavez, organizers announced. Each of the participants will fast a day or two in succession until Oct. 6 to carry on the 36-day fast that Chavez staged to draw attention to the use of pesticides in California's grape fields. Westside city council members, West Hollywood Mayor Helen Albert, Santa Monica City Atty.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
Kelly Clark, daughter of actress Lynn Redgrave and niece of actress Vanessa Redgrave, will make her American stage debut March 6 at Santa Monica College. Clark, whose parents have a home in Topanga Canyon, will star in William Congreve's Restoration comedy, "The Way of the World." She and fellow cast members are students at the Guildford School of Acting in England. The British student production is part of a swap between the English acting school and Santa Monica Community College.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | LORENZA MUNOZ
Bonnie Frankel, the 49-year-old collegiate swimmer and runner who successfully challenged the National Collegiate Athletic Assn.'s athletic eligibility rules, is taking her story to the lecture circuit. Frankel, a self-described "older adolescent," has quite a story to tell. She has overcome breast cancer, divorce, the pain of her mother's suicide--and successfully challenged the NCAA, winning the right to compete for Division I college swimming and track teams in midlife.
SPORTS
February 7, 1990 | BRENDAN HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Valley-area junior college athletic administrators believe that open recruiting would be a reasonable alternative to the district-based system, although a court decision this week supported the current arrangement. Previously able to recruit in 12 high schools outside its two-school district, Santa Monica Community College had sought a preliminary injunction that would have returned the boundaries to the original borders.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | SEAN WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1951, Don Rosenthal, a highly touted high school swimmer from Cincinnati, walked into the men's athletic office at Santa Monica Community College and asked to meet the new swim coach. Rosenthal told the coach that he was interested in trying out for the swim team and began rattling off some impressive times he had in freestyle races. The coach, who played football and rugby at UCLA, gave the recruit a deadpan look. "I wasn't the least impressed," John Joseph said.
NEWS
June 25, 1995
Now that a "cease-fire" has been declared by a democratic voting process at Santa Monica College (Westside, June 15) and our Board of Trustees can begin to focus on an appropriate welcoming agenda for the new president, Dr. Piedad Robertson, I would like to add my 2 cents plain. I have always identified this beloved institution as Santa Monica Community College, which creates an image that is pleasing to me of the college belonging to all of us, like the public library. On a personal level, I have two adult daughters, Terry and Laura, who are graduates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chui L. Tsang, 54, president of San Jose City College, was chosen Monday to be the next president of Santa Monica College, effective in February. Tsang previously was dean of the school of applied science and technology at the City College of San Francisco. She also has taught at Stanford University and San Francisco State. At Santa Monica, he will succeed Piedad F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Piedad F. Robertson, president of Santa Monica College since 1995, announced her retirement Wednesday and said she would become president of the Education Commission of the States, a Denver-based nonpartisan education group. In addition to presiding over the 25,000-student community college, Robertson served on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's 2003 transition team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Charlotte Guevarra, 27, was just out of community college when she landed a job as a respiratory therapist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center four years ago. The job, which paid more than $15 an hour, was everything she had worked and hoped for. After a couple of years, however, Guevarra wanted to move up in medicine. She set her sights on becoming a registered nurse, knowing that jobs are plentiful and pay is high due to a nationwide shortage of nurses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2002 | Carolyn Patricia Scott, Times Staff Writer
"But they're both the real Kirk. It's not that one is the impostor," Arthur Lechtholz-Zey argues. James Stramel disagrees. "I think that one of the reasons why the rational but weak and ineffectual Kirk is regarded as the real Kirk -- the good one -- is because the view of 'Star Trek' and the episode is that what is most definitive of the human personality is our reason," he says. An argument between a pair of Trekkies? A disagreement between sci-fi fanatics? No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Santa Monica College, known for sending many students on to four-year universities, especially UCLA, last year raised its transfer rate to all University of California campuses by 32%. College officials credit the increase, which was well above the 9.6% record growth last year for such transfers statewide, in part to a larger counseling staff, more courses transferable to UC and aggressive efforts to attract well-prepared students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both mother and son try not to dwell on what they could have done differently that November night 11 years ago when a .45-caliber bullet pierced his brain. She might have disregarded that 104-vehicle freeway pileup near Coalinga the day before, which made her tell him to use surface streets coming home from the movies. He might not have flooded his car's engine as he tried to flee from bullets spraying through his rear window.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Charlotte Guevarra, 27, was just out of community college when she landed a job as a respiratory therapist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center four years ago. The job, which paid more than $15 an hour, was everything she had worked and hoped for. After a couple of years, however, Guevarra wanted to move up in medicine. She set her sights on becoming a registered nurse, knowing that jobs are plentiful and pay is high due to a nationwide shortage of nurses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001
A $24-million expansion and modernization project that will nearly double the size of the library at Santa Monica College was launched Tuesday with a ceremony that included State Librarian Kevin Starr. The construction is being financed with state and federal money and a locally approved bond issue. It will include seating for 1,300, 165 computer workstations and hookups for laptops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy years later, officials at Santa Monica College still spout the same line that they used to lure their first student there. Raymond Davis knows. Because he was there in 1929 when the place opened. "They said I could get everything I wanted at this new college and not have to go so far to get it," recalled Davis. "It sounded good to me."
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