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Santa Monica Elections

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NEWS
March 17, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In a report that is highly critical of Santa Monica's political process, a nonprofit organization has charged that the city's local elections are too costly, too exclusive and too lax in areas of financial accountability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
A commission examining the campaign tactics of opponents of Santa Monica's so-called living wage measure will ask county prosecutors and state elections officials today to investigate possible violations. The Santa Monica Living Wage Commission of Inquiry -- a panel of lawyers, clergy and others assembled by supporters of the living wage measure -- will also release a report contending that opponents misled voters and calling for reforms.
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NEWS
January 9, 1986
Saying he was "burned out" on politics, Terry Pullan has sold his partnership in Marathon Communications, the consulting firm credited with steering the All Santa Monica Coalition to a majority on the Santa Monica City Council. Pullan, 35, said that he plans to become involved in real estate. Although he said he will "keep my hand in politics" by playing a consulting role in the Santa Monica elections in the fall, Pullan said that he will reduce his role in politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Santa Monica locals know Jerry Rubin as the suntanned and sandaled man with a bumper sticker and a hunger strike for nearly every liberal cause. This year, he's run an unusual campaign for Santa Monica City Council by refusing donations, volunteers and endorsements and asking for votes "only if you think I deserve it." The one thing Rubin demands, however, is that the phrase "peace activist" appear under his name on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
A commission examining the campaign tactics of opponents of Santa Monica's so-called living wage measure will ask county prosecutors and state elections officials today to investigate possible violations. The Santa Monica Living Wage Commission of Inquiry -- a panel of lawyers, clergy and others assembled by supporters of the living wage measure -- will also release a report contending that opponents misled voters and calling for reforms.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | BARBARA BAIRD, Times Staff Writer
For five days, Pat Nichelson thought he had been elected to the Santa Monica College Board of Trustees by a margin of 98 votes. But Monday afternoon, Nichelson found out that he had lost by 78 votes to incumbent James M. Bambrick. The turnaround occurred because Los Angeles County officials have now tallied thousands of the 2.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
With City Council elections over for this year, a group of community activists is stepping up its efforts to have Santa Monica divided into voting districts. District council elections, the group contends, would give minorities a better shot at winning an office, increase representation of neighborhoods and bring down the costs of campaigning. But others say that drawing district lines doesn't make sense in a city as small as Santa Monica. The city would become fractionalized, they argue.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica City Council has rebuffed a citizens group that was seeking to place on the November ballot a measure that would replace the at-large system of council representation with a district system and limit council members to two consecutive terms in office. Instead, the council voted Tuesday to refer the issue to a Charter commission, as yet unnamed, that would be charged with studying a number of issues, including council pay raises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Santa Monica locals know Jerry Rubin as the suntanned and sandaled man with a bumper sticker and a hunger strike for nearly every liberal cause. This year, he's run an unusual campaign for Santa Monica City Council by refusing donations, volunteers and endorsements and asking for votes "only if you think I deserve it." The one thing Rubin demands, however, is that the phrase "peace activist" appear under his name on the November ballot.
NEWS
September 9, 1990
Santa Monica residents who intend to vote Nov. 6 might consider putting in a request now for the day off. It's going to take some time. Along with voters everywhere else in California, Santa Monica residents will be choosing a governor, lieutenant governor, controller, treasurer, secretary of state and insurance commissioner, and representatives in Congress, the state Assembly and state Senate.
NEWS
November 29, 1990
The City Council certified the results of the Nov. 6 municipal elections Tuesday night and swore in winners in the races for Santa Monica Community College Board of Trustees, Rent Control Board and City Council. The ceremony saw teary eyes as three new council members, Robert T. Holbrook, Kelly Olsen and Tony Vazquez, replaced Christine E. Reed, William H. Jennings and David B. Finkel on the dais.
NEWS
September 9, 1990
Santa Monica residents who intend to vote Nov. 6 might consider putting in a request now for the day off. It's going to take some time. Along with voters everywhere else in California, Santa Monica residents will be choosing a governor, lieutenant governor, controller, treasurer, secretary of state and insurance commissioner, and representatives in Congress, the state Assembly and state Senate.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There will be many new faces at the meetings of the elected governmental councils in Santa Monica come November. Across the board, most incumbents have chosen not to seek reelection. For the Santa Monica City Council, where three seats are up for grabs Nov. 6, only one of the nine candidates is an incumbent. For the Santa Monica Rent Control Board, just one of the eight candidates running for four seats is an incumbent.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Monica City Council has rebuffed a citizens group that was seeking to place on the November ballot a measure that would replace the at-large system of council representation with a district system and limit council members to two consecutive terms in office. Instead, the council voted Tuesday to refer the issue to a Charter commission, as yet unnamed, that would be charged with studying a number of issues, including council pay raises.
NEWS
February 22, 1990
A community group launched an initiative drive last week to have voters elect City Council members by district instead of at-large, and to limit council members to two consecutive terms. The group, Citizens United to Reform Elections, filed a notice with the city clerk to circulate a petition. The group has until early August to collect 8,435 signatures, which represents 15% of the city's registered voters.
NEWS
July 6, 1989
James L. Hesburgh has been elected president of the St. John's Hospital and Health Center Foundation board of trustees. A trustee of the foundation for five years, Hesburgh is president of an export management and consulting firm in Pacific Palisades.
NEWS
February 13, 1986
The City Council gave final approval Tuesday to a law abolishing the city's Fair Election Practices Commission. The commission was created to enforce city campaign laws, including limits on campaign contributions and spending. But some council members have said the commission had little regulatory power and did not have much business to conduct. The commission was set up after the statewide Fair Political Practices Commission was formed in 1974.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
With City Council elections over for this year, a group of community activists is stepping up its efforts to have Santa Monica divided into voting districts. District council elections, the group contends, would give minorities a better shot at winning an office, increase representation of neighborhoods and bring down the costs of campaigning. But others say that drawing district lines doesn't make sense in a city as small as Santa Monica. The city would become fractionalized, they argue.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In a report that is highly critical of Santa Monica's political process, a nonprofit organization has charged that the city's local elections are too costly, too exclusive and too lax in areas of financial accountability.
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