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Santa Monica Museum

May 4, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Theater director Peter Sellars, a UCLA professor of world arts and cultures, will be honored by the Santa Monica Museum of Art at its 25th-anniversary Precognito Gala on May 9. Why are you based in Los Angeles instead of New York, which has a larger arts community? For me, Los Angeles has always been the future and New York has always been the past. New York is the old power structure, and frankly, what's way more interesting is what's taking form in the 21st century in L.A. The future of America is happening right here.
On Thursday, the Santa Monica Museum of Art transformed its big, central gallery into a bracing rumpus room for the eye, the mind and the soul, courtesy of a 15-year survey of sculpture by Jim Isermann. The three dozen works in this concise presentation comprise the most satisfying show yet in the museum's inaugural year at Bergamot Station.
June 8, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
There is a wonderful photograph near the beginning of "Identity Theft: Eleanor Antin, Lynn Hershman, Suzy Lake, 1972-1978," the Santa Monica Museum of Art's contribution to this season's feminist spectacular. In it, Antin appears dressed as a nurse, lying across the pillows of a bed, surrounded by stuffed animals and paper dolls, biting her thumbnail and smirking like a mischievous 12-year-old.
August 23, 2009 | Leah Ollman
Only months out of graduate school, painter Jeni Spota had her first solo gallery show. Not that unusual, perhaps, in an art world that mirrors the broader culture's lust for youth and novelty. The show, at Chinatown's Sister gallery, sold out before it opened. A few months later, Spota had a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, part of a series featuring emerging area artists. Such a show, early in a career, is also becoming less out-of-the-ordinary, but hers was the first in the series, recalls curator Julie Rodrigues Widholm, "where I had to borrow every piece from collectors, major collectors," most notably Paris-based François Pinault, and L.A.'s Dean Valentine and Amy Adelson.
January 30, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Forever 21, the Los Angeles-based retailer famous for selling runway-ready looks for less than the cost of lunch at La Scala, will debut its first-ever designer collaboration on Friday ? with local designer Nony Tochterman of Petro Zillia. The 11-piece collection includes cardigans, knit and denim hot pants, bandeau tops, mini-dresses and over-the-knee socks ? all in the famously pink-haired designer's beloved stripes and bright colors. Standout looks include a hot pink sweater with embroidery detailing and tiered, ruffled short sleeves; a black V-neck cardigan with red and hot pink trim; and a striped tube dress with spaghetti straps (strictly for the very young, of course)
February 12, 1989
Your reporter (Tracy) Wilkinson wrote an article about the criminal arraignment of a Santa Monica developer, Abby Sher, in connection with events surrounding her Edgemar museum-restaurant complex on Main Street. (Times, Jan. 15.) On Jan. 29, you printed a letter from the museum director, Thomas Rhoads. Rhoads' letter attempted to "correct some factual errors" in the Wilkinson article, regarding the relationship between this developer, Edgemar and the museum. Rhoads went to some length to draw a distinction between Sher's business dealings and the operations of the museum, objecting to Wilkinson's use of the term "private museum," and commenting that "in fact, the museum is a separate entity from Edgemar."
July 29, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
In the lofty main gallery of the Santa Monica Museum of Art, Liga Pang is overseeing the construction of her room-sized installation using bamboo, part of a "New Work" show. While that may suggest a thicket of tall and solid poles, the raw materials of her opus are the twiggy tips of Japanese bamboo, thousands and thousands of them, painstakingly tied together to create a delicate web that hints at the dual essence of bamboo, flexible but strong, simple yet versatile.
November 28, 2002 | Jessica Hundley, Special to The Times
WHAT happens when you take a museum, a mall, an artist, an idea and 200 kids and put them together? The first installation from the Santa Monica Museum's "Wall Works" program, a 19-foot mural whose components are surprisingly varied, an imaginative collage of shapes and images, from frogs to turtles, lizards, fish and serpents. The mural, on display at the Santa Monica Place Mall just outside the third floor of Robinsons-May, is a collaboration of the museum, Santa Monica Place, L.A.
A new show at the Santa Monica Museum of Art is called "The Layered Look: Towards an Aesthetic of Accumulation Among Six Los Angeles Artists." In addition to being too long, that title sounds a little odd for an art exhibition. It evokes the world of fashion and the shameless self-aggrandizement that surrounds it. Potential viewers may rest assured the handle is ironic to the point of hostility. This exhibition is about desperation. The French call it desespoir , which literally means "without hope."
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