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NEWS
January 18, 1990
The City Council failed to pass an ordinance Tuesday night that would have empowered the Landmarks Commission to delay demolition of pre-1930 structures while they are reviewed for historic district status. The ordinance also would have allowed the delay of remodeling structures that are on a city list of 1,700 buildings under consideration for historic status. The motion lost 4 to 2. Mayor Dennis Zane said he may introduce an ordinance similar to one that failed Tuesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON and OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While attorneys speculated on the constitutionality of Santa Monica's newly approved living wage law, hotel housekeeper Blanca Mendez was just hoping Thursday that she can benefit if a raise to $10.50 an hour goes into effect next summer at large downtown and beach-side businesses. "It would be fantastic," said Mendez, who now earns $8.50 an hour after seven years at the Streamline Moderne-style Shangri-La Hotel near the ocean.
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NEWS
February 27, 1986
The Santa Monica City Council has ordered preparation of a law restricting the hours and days building contractors may work in the city. The proposal was made in response to complaints by residents about construction noise. Under the law being prepared by the city attorney, contractors would be prohibited from building or demolishing buildings, or performing excavations and grade work before 7 a.m. or after 8 p.m. on weekdays and before 9 a.m. on Saturdays.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Smokers got a breather from the Santa Monica City Council this week. After three hours of citizen comment and debate, the council Tuesday night repealed major provisions of a tough anti-smoking law that would have banned lighting up in virtually all businesses, including hotel lobbies, banquet rooms and bars. But the council left intact prohibitions against cigarette vending machines and smoking in specified public places, such as elevators and buses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2001 | OSCAR JOHNSON and OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While attorneys speculated on the constitutionality of Santa Monica's newly approved living wage law, hotel housekeeper Blanca Mendez was just hoping Thursday that she can benefit if a raise to $10.50 an hour goes into effect next summer at large downtown and beach-side businesses. "It would be fantastic," said Mendez, who now earns $8.50 an hour after seven years at the Streamline Moderne-style Shangri-La Hotel near the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica lost a bid Monday to keep feeding programs for homeless people from monopolizing city parks when a federal judge ruled a city law is unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Lourdes Baird barred the city from enforcing the law by issuing a preliminary injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of two activists, one of them homeless. The law, passed by the Santa Monica City Council in February, required groups of 35 or more to secure a permit from the city.
NEWS
January 12, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Smokers got a breather from the Santa Monica City Council this week. After three hours of citizen comment and debate, the council Tuesday night repealed major provisions of a tough anti-smoking law that would have banned lighting up in virtually all businesses, including hotel lobbies, banquet rooms and bars. But the council left intact prohibitions against cigarette vending machines and smoking in specified public places, such as elevators and buses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1987
Only in America, where a strong lobbying group like the NRA which still insists that the "right to bear arms" (to takes up arms in the service of a sovereign or a country) is the same as the "right to own guns" for any reason at all (and without registering them) can something like this happen. First Burbank, then the City of Los Angeles, and now Santa Monica pass ordinances to outlaw the sale of toy guns that look like real guns because they are dangerous. It seems that our learned representatives think that toy guns look more real and are more dangerous than real guns so that we have to be protected from them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2003 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to protect its image as a squeaky-clean suburb, Simi Valley is expected to soon start cracking down on aggressive panhandling outside stores, restaurants and supermarkets, even though city officials say it is not a major problem. An ordinance under review by the City Council also would ban begging near ATMs, banks, bus stops and on public transportation, all places where residents are most vulnerable to the solicitations of homeless people and charitable groups, officials said.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | NED BOYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After hearing testimony favoring outdoor dining establishments from a wide array of witnesses, South Pasadena's Public Safety Commission promised to recommend revisions in the City Code to legally allow the popular pastime. The commission explored the safety issue because the city believed it might be held liable if sidewalk obstructions, including tables and chairs, contributed to an accident. Three restaurants in the city currently offer outdoor dining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica lost a bid Monday to keep feeding programs for homeless people from monopolizing city parks when a federal judge ruled a city law is unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Lourdes Baird barred the city from enforcing the law by issuing a preliminary injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of two activists, one of them homeless. The law, passed by the Santa Monica City Council in February, required groups of 35 or more to secure a permit from the city.
NEWS
January 18, 1990
The City Council failed to pass an ordinance Tuesday night that would have empowered the Landmarks Commission to delay demolition of pre-1930 structures while they are reviewed for historic district status. The ordinance also would have allowed the delay of remodeling structures that are on a city list of 1,700 buildings under consideration for historic status. The motion lost 4 to 2. Mayor Dennis Zane said he may introduce an ordinance similar to one that failed Tuesday.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
The Santa Monica City Council has ordered preparation of a law restricting the hours and days building contractors may work in the city. The proposal was made in response to complaints by residents about construction noise. Under the law being prepared by the city attorney, contractors would be prohibited from building or demolishing buildings, or performing excavations and grade work before 7 a.m. or after 8 p.m. on weekdays and before 9 a.m. on Saturdays.
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