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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Stephen Hunter, Washington Post
It isn't easy hating Santa Claus, but somebody's got to do it. Really, for the 100 million or so of us who loathe the phony cheer of Christmas, the slather of sanctimony that hides the greed, the subtle extortions that underlie most family transactions and the awful music and lights, nobody tees us off like that bloated fraud with his fat red cheeks and his goofy red suit, and that cottony swath of unkempt beard and the twinkly eyes of a serious crackhead. He's not even real.
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BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Richard Verrier
New Mexico is determined to stay in the Hollywood limelight. Much to the chagrin of California, New Mexico has emerged as a major draw for movies and TV shows in recent years. Credit a generous 25% film production rebate, favorable climate and an aggressive film office. Now the state that bills itself as "Hollywood's Newest Home" is ratcheting up the competition. With the support of a $10-million economic development grant from the state, developers are about to break ground on a major production studio just outside Santa Fe, the state's capital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Santa," the classic 1931 film that launched the era of sound in the Mexican film industry, will screen Wednesday in downtown Los Angeles with a special guest appearance by its leading actress, 91-year-old Lupita Tovar. The rare showing of the Spanish-language film (with English subtitles) will take place at the Palace Theatre on Broadway, one of downtown's ornate old movie houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Stephen Hunter, Washington Post
It isn't easy hating Santa Claus, but somebody's got to do it. Really, for the 100 million or so of us who loathe the phony cheer of Christmas, the slather of sanctimony that hides the greed, the subtle extortions that underlie most family transactions and the awful music and lights, nobody tees us off like that bloated fraud with his fat red cheeks and his goofy red suit, and that cottony swath of unkempt beard and the twinkly eyes of a serious crackhead. He's not even real.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | Leslie Earnest
Movie buff Todd Blood is undertaking a formidable task--breathing life into an abandoned six-screen Santa Ana theater complex that succumbed to a glut of flashy megaplexes, including the Southland's highest-grossing theater a couple of miles away. Blood, who resurrected a darkened single-screen theater in Orange seven years ago, plans to reopen the six-screen movie house today at MainPlace/Santa Ana mall, seven weeks after struggling chain AMC Entertainment Inc. shut the theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JON NALICK
Until this week, few students at Martin R. Heninger Elementary School had ever met a movie star, and probably none had ever been licked on the face by one. But that changed Tuesday morning, when about 750 excited students greeted one of their favorite stars of the silver screen, a 9-year-old golden retriever named Ben.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Richard Verrier
New Mexico is determined to stay in the Hollywood limelight. Much to the chagrin of California, New Mexico has emerged as a major draw for movies and TV shows in recent years. Credit a generous 25% film production rebate, favorable climate and an aggressive film office. Now the state that bills itself as "Hollywood's Newest Home" is ratcheting up the competition. With the support of a $10-million economic development grant from the state, developers are about to break ground on a major production studio just outside Santa Fe, the state's capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES MOVIE EDITOR
Outlaw Productions has one of the lowest profiles of any independent movie company in Hollywood. It has never been housed in a conventional office--let alone on a studio lot. Its principals have never even hired a personal publicist, despite its having produced 10 movies over the past seven years, including 1989's art-house darling "sex, lies and videotape."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Today we send up a rocket for the independents among us, those Americans who do their own things as they swim upstream listening to the sounds of different drummers. The subtext is making it sometimes in an often brutal commercial world. Gregg Araki makes movies and is called by some the king of L.A. guerrilla filmmakers. He turns out feature-length films that cost under $5,000 for audiences that just might fill up a telephone booth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Nothing can be more terrifying, or exhilarating, than absolute candor. And Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-Mexican-Parisian director who made the '70s cult hits "El Topo" and "The Holy Mountain" is nothing if not candid. When describing the generation of the eerie imagery in these movies, and in his latest, "Santa Sangre," he explains: "Everything came from me. I am a very weird person." "Santa Sangre" is a very weird movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Santa," the classic 1931 film that launched the era of sound in the Mexican film industry, will screen Wednesday in downtown Los Angeles with a special guest appearance by its leading actress, 91-year-old Lupita Tovar. The rare showing of the Spanish-language film (with English subtitles) will take place at the Palace Theatre on Broadway, one of downtown's ornate old movie houses.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | Leslie Earnest
Movie buff Todd Blood is undertaking a formidable task--breathing life into an abandoned six-screen Santa Ana theater complex that succumbed to a glut of flashy megaplexes, including the Southland's highest-grossing theater a couple of miles away. Blood, who resurrected a darkened single-screen theater in Orange seven years ago, plans to reopen the six-screen movie house today at MainPlace/Santa Ana mall, seven weeks after struggling chain AMC Entertainment Inc. shut the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES MOVIE EDITOR
Outlaw Productions has one of the lowest profiles of any independent movie company in Hollywood. It has never been housed in a conventional office--let alone on a studio lot. Its principals have never even hired a personal publicist, despite its having produced 10 movies over the past seven years, including 1989's art-house darling "sex, lies and videotape."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JON NALICK
Until this week, few students at Martin R. Heninger Elementary School had ever met a movie star, and probably none had ever been licked on the face by one. But that changed Tuesday morning, when about 750 excited students greeted one of their favorite stars of the silver screen, a 9-year-old golden retriever named Ben.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Today we send up a rocket for the independents among us, those Americans who do their own things as they swim upstream listening to the sounds of different drummers. The subtext is making it sometimes in an often brutal commercial world. Gregg Araki makes movies and is called by some the king of L.A. guerrilla filmmakers. He turns out feature-length films that cost under $5,000 for audiences that just might fill up a telephone booth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Nothing can be more terrifying, or exhilarating, than absolute candor. And Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Chilean-Mexican-Parisian director who made the '70s cult hits "El Topo" and "The Holy Mountain" is nothing if not candid. When describing the generation of the eerie imagery in these movies, and in his latest, "Santa Sangre," he explains: "Everything came from me. I am a very weird person." "Santa Sangre" is a very weird movie.
NEWS
April 6, 1987
A 17-year-old Santa Monica movie theater cashier was shot and killed execution-style and an assistant manager was wounded during a robbery at the Wilshire Theater. Henry Cuesta died at Santa Monica Hospital Medical Center from gunshot wounds to the neck. James Randell, 24, the assistant manager, was reported in serious but stable condition at the hospital, also with bullet wounds to the neck.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
With generations of Trekkers providing a built-in audience, Paramount Pictures' "Star Trek: Generations" soared to the top of the weekend box-office chart. As science-fiction fans of the intergalactic saga fretted over the future of Capt. James Kirk, the movie did what Paramount had hoped all along: attract moviegoers to a later generation of "Star Trek" heroes, one that may no longer feature Kirk, Spock and the crew of the original Enterprise.
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