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Santa Rosa Plateau

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NEWS
November 21, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Rosa Plateau is an ecological jewel, an oasis in the sprawl of subdivisions carpeting southwestern Riverside County. Perched in the Santa Ana Mountains above Murrieta, the plateau is a remnant of old California--acres of rolling, native grassland dotted with dense groves of rare Engelmann oak trees. The Nature Conservancy was so taken with the site that it purchased 3,100 acres and created a preserve there in 1984.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN
The water ripples cold around his knees as Russ Smith sloshes up the San Francisquito Canyon creek near Santa Clarita, parting willows and weeds and peering through binoculars in search of one of the world's rarest creatures. "There used to be some in here," he says, scanning every inch of mud beneath a roadway bridge slathered with spray-painted images of hypodermic needles and Nazi symbols. "They must be hiding."
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NEWS
October 21, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As is most open acreage in Southern California, the Santa Rosa Plateau is surrounded by mile after mile of fencing. Here, however, the fences are not designed to keep valuable cattle from wandering off the property. Rather, their purpose is to ensure that cattle never get in. From dawn to dusk every day of the year, the reserve's 15 miles of trails and roads are open to hikers, bird watchers and other nature lovers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The water ripples cold around his knees as Russ Smith sloshes up San Francisquito Canyon creek, parting willows and weeds and peering through binoculars in search of one of California's rarest creatures. "There used to be some in here," he says, scanning every inch of mud beneath a roadway bridge slathered with spray-painted images of hypodermic needles and Nazi symbols. "They must be hiding."
OPINION
November 26, 1989
At some point, Southern California must decide whether every last fine natural area is going to be converted to houses, condos, office buildings, shopping malls and parking lots. A perfectly logical spot for making that decision, for drawing the line, is the Santa Rosa Plateau in southern Riverside County. The 15,000-acre plateau in the Santa Ana Mountains south of Murrieta has been recognized by UNESCO as a biosphere reserve, one of three such special places in California.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Riverside County supervisors approved a land-use plan that critics say opens the door for development of the ecologically sensitive Santa Rosa Plateau in the Santa Ana Mountains above Murrieta. The board's action increased the allowable building densities on the scenic plateau, much of which is owned by a Temecula developer who wants to construct 3,855 homes, a golf course, schools and commercial facilities there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A wildlife habitat--where 2,400 homes, a golf course and a commercial center had been planned--has been sold to the Nature Conservancy, a nonprofit environmental organization. In a complex financial deal, the group bought 3,825 acres of the Santa Rosa Plateau in Riverside County from developer RANPAC Inc. for more than $35 million, officials said. The organization already owns 3,100 acres of the plateau, home for such endangered species as the golden eagle, mountain lion and burrowing owl.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is the author of hiking books and a regular contributor to The Times
Hard-riding Spanish vaqueros called the deep holes in creek beds tenajas (Spanish for tanks), because the holes, which were full year-round, provided crucial summer water for cows and cowboys. Today the tenajas offer habitat for such amphibians as the Western pond turtle and red-legged frog.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a crucial victory for environmentalists, a Riverside County developer agreed Saturday to scrap plans for a sprawling subdivision on an ecologically sensitive plateau and instead will sell his property for open space. After nine months of negotiations, Won Yoo, president of RANPAC Inc., announced he will sell his land on the Santa Rosa Plateau near Lake Elsinore to the California Nature Conservancy for $35.4 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN
The water ripples cold around his knees as Russ Smith sloshes up the San Francisquito Canyon creek near Santa Clarita, parting willows and weeds and peering through binoculars in search of one of the world's rarest creatures. "There used to be some in here," he says, scanning every inch of mud beneath a roadway bridge slathered with spray-painted images of hypodermic needles and Nazi symbols. "They must be hiding."
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As is most open acreage in Southern California, the Santa Rosa Plateau is surrounded by mile after mile of fencing. Here, however, the fences are not designed to keep valuable cattle from wandering off the property. Rather, their purpose is to ensure that cattle never get in. From dawn to dusk every day of the year, the reserve's 15 miles of trails and roads are open to hikers, bird watchers and other nature lovers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A wildlife habitat--where 2,400 homes, a golf course and a commercial center had been planned--has been sold to the Nature Conservancy, a nonprofit environmental organization. In a complex financial deal, the group bought 3,825 acres of the Santa Rosa Plateau in Riverside County from developer RANPAC Inc. for more than $35 million, officials said. The organization already owns 3,100 acres of the plateau, home for such endangered species as the golden eagle, mountain lion and burrowing owl.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a crucial victory for environmentalists, a Riverside County developer agreed Saturday to scrap plans for a sprawling subdivision on an ecologically sensitive plateau and instead will sell his property for open space. After nine months of negotiations, Won Yoo, president of RANPAC Inc., announced he will sell his land on the Santa Rosa Plateau near Lake Elsinore to the California Nature Conservancy for $35.4 million.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is the author of hiking books and a regular contributor to The Times
Hard-riding Spanish vaqueros called the deep holes in creek beds tenajas (Spanish for tanks), because the holes, which were full year-round, provided crucial summer water for cows and cowboys. Today the tenajas offer habitat for such amphibians as the Western pond turtle and red-legged frog.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Riverside County supervisors approved a land-use plan that critics say opens the door for development of the ecologically sensitive Santa Rosa Plateau in the Santa Ana Mountains above Murrieta. The board's action increased the allowable building densities on the scenic plateau, much of which is owned by a Temecula developer who wants to construct 3,855 homes, a golf course, schools and commercial facilities there.
OPINION
November 26, 1989
At some point, Southern California must decide whether every last fine natural area is going to be converted to houses, condos, office buildings, shopping malls and parking lots. A perfectly logical spot for making that decision, for drawing the line, is the Santa Rosa Plateau in southern Riverside County. The 15,000-acre plateau in the Santa Ana Mountains south of Murrieta has been recognized by UNESCO as a biosphere reserve, one of three such special places in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The water ripples cold around his knees as Russ Smith sloshes up San Francisquito Canyon creek, parting willows and weeds and peering through binoculars in search of one of California's rarest creatures. "There used to be some in here," he says, scanning every inch of mud beneath a roadway bridge slathered with spray-painted images of hypodermic needles and Nazi symbols. "They must be hiding."
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 113-acre parcel of land, located in the Santa Ana Mountains of southern Riverside County and owned by the Dow Chemical Co., has been donated to the Nature Conservancy of California for management as a wildlife preserve. The land, in an area zoned for estate-size residential development and valued at about $1 million, will serve as a wildlife "steppingstone" linking the 7,000-acre Santa Rosa Plateau wildlife preserve near Temecula and the Cleveland National Forest to the west, officials said.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Santa Rosa Plateau is an ecological jewel, an oasis in the sprawl of subdivisions carpeting southwestern Riverside County. Perched in the Santa Ana Mountains above Murrieta, the plateau is a remnant of old California--acres of rolling, native grassland dotted with dense groves of rare Engelmann oak trees. The Nature Conservancy was so taken with the site that it purchased 3,100 acres and created a preserve there in 1984.
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