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Santa Rosalia Mexico

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | ERNEST SANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A stroll around this dusty but colorful city of 15,000 can be culturally confusing. First, there's the church designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (of Eiffel Tower fame). Then there's the bakery specializing in baguettes. And, finally, there are the sweeping porches and balconies of French colonial architecture. The French occupied Mexico in the 1860s and left their mark in places throughout the country. Eiffel even designed buildings in other parts of Latin America.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | ERNEST SANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A stroll around this dusty but colorful city of 15,000 can be culturally confusing. First, there's the church designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (of Eiffel Tower fame). Then there's the bakery specializing in baguettes. And, finally, there are the sweeping porches and balconies of French colonial architecture. The French occupied Mexico in the 1860s and left their mark in places throughout the country. Eiffel even designed buildings in other parts of Latin America.
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SPORTS
January 19, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Super welterweight Danny Perez of San Diego won a methodical and unanimous 10-round decision over Jose Luis Zaragoza of Veracruz, Mexico, Thursday night before 3,375 at the Arrowhead Pond. Perez (22-2, 15 knockouts), ranked seventh by the World Boxing Council, was occasionally booed by the antsy crowd, but he stuck to his game plan and wore down Valenzuela with a heavy left jab and fierce right hand. Late in the 10th round, Perez sent Valenzuela to the canvas with a vicious overhand right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2002 | VERONIQUE de TURENNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The largest herd of bighorn sheep in the Rancho Mirage desert highlands may perch not above some rocky point but on the city's supply of stationery, which features a stylized ram. Chosen by Rancho Mirage as its official symbol nearly three decades ago, the bighorn's fortunes have faltered as the city's population swelled. Struck by cars, drowned in swimming pools, poisoned by pesticides and exotic plants, the animal's plight puts it on the federal endangered species list.
TRAVEL
May 27, 1990 | ERIC ELLMAN, Ellman is the co-author of "Bicycling Mexico" (Hunter Publishing, 1990) and is at work on a guide to mountain biking in Baja California
Mullet leaped in the dark shallows of Bahia Concepcion. Bioluminescent plankton glimmered in the wake of each splashing fish. Christian and I were sprawled in the sand. We slurped down hand-dug clams and the last of the Pacifico beer, savoring the sweet payoff to having cycled half the length of the Baja Peninsula. Campers, fishermen and off-road enthusiasts have long enjoyed the peninsula's pleasures.
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