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Santa Susanna Field Laboratory

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NEWS
February 14, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While federal investigators continue to probe a 1994 blast that killed two scientists at Rockwell International's Santa Susanna Field Lab, the company said Tuesday it has agreed to settle a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the men's families. The lawsuit was one of several legal problems facing Rockwell's Rocketdyne division since the July 26, 1994, explosion killed company physicists Otto K. Heiney and Larry A. Pugh.
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NEWS
February 14, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While federal investigators continue to probe a 1994 blast that killed two scientists at Rockwell International's Santa Susanna Field Lab, the company said Tuesday it has agreed to settle a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the men's families. The lawsuit was one of several legal problems facing Rockwell's Rocketdyne division since the July 26, 1994, explosion killed company physicists Otto K. Heiney and Larry A. Pugh.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989
Federal energy department officials Thursday released documents showing that dozens of nuclear workers at Rockwell International in Canoga Park and its Santa Susanna field laboratory were exposed to excessive radiation levels on occasions in the 1960s. The records reveal no over exposures in subsequent years, and a department official described the 1960s events as "minor over exposures" with "no health consequences" for the workers. But the records, provided to The Times by the Department of Energy under the Freedom of Information Act, do not include two over exposure events that Rockwell officials have said took place in the 1970s and 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elevated rates of bladder cancer have been found in some areas east of Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory, according to a preliminary state health report that draws no conclusions about the cause of the increase. The six-page report, dated October, 1990, but released Monday, said bladder cancer rates were about 50% higher in three census tracts in Canoga Park and Chatsworth than for Los Angeles County as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1989
Minor releases of radioactive material have occurred accidentally 12 times during the last 20 years at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory near Chatsworth, according to a report Rockwell International submitted Monday to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Rockwell filed the report in response to an order from NRC Administrative Law Judge Peter Bloch, who is to rule on Rockwell's request to renew the nuclear materials license for its "hot lab."
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 100 federal agents clad in protective clothing raided the sprawling Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant Tuesday as the Justice Department launched its first criminal investigation of such a facility. Officials refused to say what triggered the probe, but a statement issued by the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., said it focuses on the storage, treatment and disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes "in the past." Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh stressed that it "does not signal any major new environmental safety or health concern."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elevated rates of bladder cancer have been found in some areas east of Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory, according to a preliminary state health report that draws no conclusions about the cause of the increase. The six-page report, dated October, 1990, but released Monday, said bladder cancer rates were about 50% higher in three census tracts in Canoga Park and Chatsworth than for Los Angeles County as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1989
Rockwell International has announced plans to close its nuclear "hot lab" at the Santa Susana field laboratory west of Chatsworth, which had become a lightning rod for protests by neighborhood and anti-nuclear activists. Rockwell, which has been seeking a 10-year extension of a special nuclear materials license to operate the hot lab, said it will instead request renewal of the license only through next October to complete current work and will file a decontamination plan with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1999
Re "Rocketdyne Report a Beginning," Ventura County editorials, Nov. 21. This sad beginning proves once again that the fox can't be trusted to guard the henhouse! The report by the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry finding no link between the Rocketdyne / Boeing Santa Susanna Field Laboratory pollution and surrounding community health problems (cancer clusters) is shocking! However, ATSD chose not to do independent studies but rather to accept without question Rocketdyne's version of data that may have nothing to do with reality!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A health study of employees at Rockwell's Santa Susanna Field Laboratory should look at chemical hazards faced by all the company's employees, not just risks to workers under contract to the Department of Energy, an advisory panel overseeing the study said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1989
Minor releases of radioactive material have occurred accidentally 12 times during the last 20 years at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory near Chatsworth, according to a report Rockwell International submitted Monday to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Rockwell filed the report in response to an order from NRC Administrative Law Judge Peter Bloch, who is to rule on Rockwell's request to renew the nuclear materials license for its "hot lab."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1989
Rockwell International has announced plans to close its nuclear "hot lab" at the Santa Susana field laboratory west of Chatsworth, which had become a lightning rod for protests by neighborhood and anti-nuclear activists. Rockwell, which has been seeking a 10-year extension of a special nuclear materials license to operate the hot lab, said it will instead request renewal of the license only through next October to complete current work and will file a decontamination plan with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1989
Federal energy department officials Thursday released documents showing that dozens of nuclear workers at Rockwell International in Canoga Park and its Santa Susanna field laboratory were exposed to excessive radiation levels on occasions in the 1960s. The records reveal no over exposures in subsequent years, and a department official described the 1960s events as "minor over exposures" with "no health consequences" for the workers. But the records, provided to The Times by the Department of Energy under the Freedom of Information Act, do not include two over exposure events that Rockwell officials have said took place in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 100 federal agents clad in protective clothing raided the sprawling Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant Tuesday as the Justice Department launched its first criminal investigation of such a facility. Officials refused to say what triggered the probe, but a statement issued by the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., said it focuses on the storage, treatment and disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes "in the past." Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh stressed that it "does not signal any major new environmental safety or health concern."
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still facing a federal criminal investigation into a 1994 blast that killed two scientists at Rockwell International's Santa Susanna Field Lab, the company is settling one of its related legal problems--a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the men's families. The wrongful-death suit was just one of several legal moves against Rockwell's Rocketdyne division since the July 26, 1994, explosion that killed company physicists Otto K. Heiney and Larry A. Pugh.
OPINION
April 18, 2011
Recipe for success Re "L.A. can't escape TV chef's drama," April 14 Kudos to former Los Unified School District Supt. Ramon C. Cortines for standing up to TV chef Jamie Oliver and not allowing him into our school's kitchens. For reality TV shows to work — and I used the term "reality" very loosely — there always has to be a villain. Guess who that would have been? L.A. Unified efficiently serves tens of thousands of nutritious lunches each day. There are choices of entrees, they come with fruit and vegetables, not candy or soda, and most of the meals cost less than a dollar.
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