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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990
Officials at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte, saying they have lost millions of dollars treating Medi-Cal patients, have announced that they will drop out of the program effective Aug. 1. The 283-bed hospital is reimbursed by the state for less than half of what it costs to care for its Medi-Cal patients, hospital Administrator Michael Costello said. The hospital lost about $1.1 million caring for Medi-Cal patients last year alone, he said.
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NEWS
December 15, 1991
Mr. Desens certainly has the right to express anything in his letter that he feels appropriate. Our concern is the appearance that the Los Angeles Times has made a very untrue (and editorial) comment with the headline "Duarte's Government Neglects Residents." The appearance is that the Los Angeles Times is supporting Mr. Desens' position and that his experience is an accepted reality. The city of Duarte has made monumental strides in meeting the needs of its residents and improving the quality of life, not only for those in Duarte but in all of the neighboring communities.
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NEWS
June 23, 1988 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Religion is the only entity that keeps and protects real art," the late Rudolph Vargas once said. "In religion, I can grow and create." The internationally known wood carver from East Los Angeles found the sanctuary he sought at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte. The Carmelite sisters there possess the largest collection of his work, more than 50 original woodcarvings, and are now making it easier for the public to view it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1990
Officials at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte, saying they have lost millions of dollars treating Medi-Cal patients, have announced that they will drop out of the program effective Aug. 1. The 283-bed hospital is reimbursed by the state for less than half of what it costs to care for its Medi-Cal patients, hospital Administrator Michael Costello said. The hospital lost about $1.1 million caring for Medi-Cal patients last year alone, he said.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Rube Hayden, the founder of Shopping Bag Food Stores and a San Marino philanthropist, has died of natural causes. He was 85. Hayden died Saturday at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte, one of the major long-term beneficiaries of his philanthropy. Among Hayden's innovative gifts to the hospital was a child-care center for its employees in 1967, long before employers considered such centers important. Born in Fancy Farm, Ky.
NEWS
January 15, 1987
Authorities asked for public help in locating a mother who fled a Duarte hospital with her 2-day-old boy who was born addicted to heroin and cocaine and in desperate need of medication. Brenda Anaya, 24, left Santa Teresita Hospital with her child who, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Chris Robbins said, is "in desperate need of continued treatment for his addiction."
NEWS
December 15, 1991
Mr. Desens certainly has the right to express anything in his letter that he feels appropriate. Our concern is the appearance that the Los Angeles Times has made a very untrue (and editorial) comment with the headline "Duarte's Government Neglects Residents." The appearance is that the Los Angeles Times is supporting Mr. Desens' position and that his experience is an accepted reality. The city of Duarte has made monumental strides in meeting the needs of its residents and improving the quality of life, not only for those in Duarte but in all of the neighboring communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
The emergency room at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte will remain open to all patients, its board of directors decided Tuesday. The hospital had warned that it might stop accepting patients brought to the emergency room in ambulances unless state and county officials approved a plan to convert 23 hospital beds to more profitable use in an affiliated nursing home. The hospital's proposal was submitted to the county Health Services Department in August. Mike Costello, the hospital's executive vice president, said that after "a long bureaucratic stalemate," the Los Angeles Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development approved the change April 13. The Health Services Department must still act on the plan.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
The emergency room at Santa Teresita Hospital will remain open to all patients, its board of directors decided this week. The hospital had warned it might stop accepting patients brought to the emergency room in ambulances unless state and county officials approved a plan to convert 23 hospital beds to more profitable use in an affiliated nursing home. Expect Acceptance Hospital officials are now convinced that the plan will be accepted by all the licensing agencies. Approval has been received from one county and one state agency.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
This small town of 21,000 wants to think like a big city. The first step, city officials say, is "strategic planning," a process copied from larger municipalities. Strategic planning relies heavily on citizen participation to find ways to capitalize on a city's strengths and overcome its weaknesses. First developed by corporations, such long-range planning has been used in recent years mostly by large cities.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Rube Hayden, the founder of Shopping Bag Food Stores and a San Marino philanthropist, has died of natural causes. He was 85. Hayden died Saturday at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte, one of the major long-term beneficiaries of his philanthropy. Among Hayden's innovative gifts to the hospital was a child-care center for its employees in 1967, long before employers considered such centers important. Born in Fancy Farm, Ky.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
The emergency room at Santa Teresita Hospital will remain open to all patients, its board of directors decided this week. The hospital had warned it might stop accepting patients brought to the emergency room in ambulances unless state and county officials approved a plan to convert 23 hospital beds to more profitable use in an affiliated nursing home. Expect Acceptance Hospital officials are now convinced that the plan will be accepted by all the licensing agencies. Approval has been received from one county and one state agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1989
The emergency room at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte will remain open to all patients, its board of directors decided Tuesday. The hospital had warned that it might stop accepting patients brought to the emergency room in ambulances unless state and county officials approved a plan to convert 23 hospital beds to more profitable use in an affiliated nursing home. The hospital's proposal was submitted to the county Health Services Department in August. Mike Costello, the hospital's executive vice president, said that after "a long bureaucratic stalemate," the Los Angeles Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development approved the change April 13. The Health Services Department must still act on the plan.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Religion is the only entity that keeps and protects real art," the late Rudolph Vargas once said. "In religion, I can grow and create." The internationally known wood carver from East Los Angeles found the sanctuary he sought at Santa Teresita Hospital in Duarte. The Carmelite sisters there possess the largest collection of his work, more than 50 original woodcarvings, and are now making it easier for the public to view it.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | SUE AVERY, Times Staff Writer
This small town of 21,000 wants to think like a big city. The first step, city officials say, is "strategic planning," a process copied from larger municipalities. Strategic planning relies heavily on citizen participation to find ways to capitalize on a city's strengths and overcome its weaknesses. First developed by corporations, such long-range planning has been used in recent years mostly by large cities.
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