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Santee Alley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1994 | Jane Spiller
Revitalizing downtown Los Angeles may seem a daunting task. But all it took for two-block-long Santee Alley to become an economic engine for the center city was an enterprising wholesale merchant in the garment district, who one day in the late 1970s stuck a rack of clothes out the back door. A shopping bazaar was born. Owners of smaller stores can pay cash and buy small quantities, rather than establishing credit and waiting weeks for merchandise from the nearby apparel marts.
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NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
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NEWS
January 12, 1990 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS
You don't have to follow the well-worn grooves of shopping mall mazes. There's a more adventurous shopping expedition available in the Santee Alley. It is an actual alley, three blocks long, sandwiched between Olympic and Los Angeles streets in the city's downtown warehouse district. Shopping here is alfresco and reminiscent of the street shopping in Mexico, China or Hong Kong. It's a refreshing alternative to enclosed mall environments. Both retailers and wholesalers set up shop along Santee.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Jewel-studded stiletto heels, rainbow-fringed leg warmers and sultry sequined gowns vie for my attention as I head to my local Taco Bell near Santee Alley in downtown L.A.'s fashion district. But I'm on a mission: to try the new Cool Ranch Doritos Locos taco supreme. Is that an unwieldy name or what? Making a Doritos taco shell could actually be genius, I think, as I step up to the counter at the fast food joint (which shares space with a Pizza Hut Express). It's a first for me. OK, I'll go with the Cool Ranch Doritos Locos taco supreme ($1.79)
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | HILLARY JOHNSON
Most of the famous shopping districts in Los Angeles operate on the principles of cachet and exclusivity. Not Santee Alley, the sweltering, swarming marketplace at the heart of downtown's Fashion District, which has more in common with a Moroccan souk than Sunset Plaza.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
With the holiday shopping season in full swing, more than 140 law enforcement officers descended on Santee Alley in what officials described as their largest raid ever on the quirky downtown shopping district famous for selling cheap knockoffs. Police and prosecutors on Friday said officers seized more than 50,000 items, including pirated CDs and DVDs as well as near-perfect reproductions of designer merchandise.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Santee Alley: An article in Saturday's California section on officials confiscating counterfeit goods in the downtown Los Angeles shopping district Santee Alley misspelled the last name of City Councilwoman Wendy Greuel as Gruel.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000
Located in the heart of downtown L.A.'s Fashion District, Santee Alley is jam-packed with funky finds, stylish stuff and even designer clothes at very low prices. Calendar Live gives you shopping tips to help you maneuver through this bargain-hunter's paradise. Crawling With Art Twenty-two art galleries in Los Feliz, Silver Lake and Echo Park open their doors tonight and Friday night for the third annual East Side Art Crawl.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | Hillary Johnson
Winter Rosebud is a fabulous creature of fashion, a blond vision in vinyl, fur, leather and studs, all of which she purchased in Santee Alley, along with her cowboy hat. She is a staff designer at Trashy Lingerie in Los Angeles, where she designs custom bras and corsets six days a week. She lives in a loft around the corner from Santee Alley and regularly trolls the shops for ideas and materials. Once in a while, she even sees a knockoff of one of her designs in a store window.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Former film and television producer Leonard Hill was having lunch at Church & State bistro, on the ground floor of the Biscuit Company Lofts, when he spotted an old colleague. Screenwriter Wendy Kout, who had worked with Hill years before, was visiting a friend who had moved into a loft in the arts district in downtown Los Angeles. Kout had created the ABC show "Anything But Love," starring Jamie Lee Curtis and Richard Lewis. After its four-season run ended in 1992, she became a playwright.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Mirabelle Vargas, 29, winds her way through the open-air stalls in downtown Los Angeles' bustling Santee Alley, hunting for Victoria's Secret underwear. Or at least undies with a tag that says Victoria's Secret. An authentic pair from the lingerie maker can cost $7.50 and up. But Vargas, a retail sales clerk, managed to find a table brimming with pink-and-white unmentionables. Price: two bucks a pop. "Of course they're not real, not at this price," said Vargas, decked out in a chocolate brown Victoria's Secret tracksuit, also counterfeit.
IMAGE
August 8, 2010 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
When I started working at the Los Angeles Times nearly 15 years ago, downtown L.A. was a style wasteland. Sure, there were denim wash houses, sewing shops, designer showrooms and studios, but you wouldn't know it walking down the street. Fashion was something that happened behind closed doors. When I went to New Moon across from the California Market Center to meet designers over the famous Chinese chicken salad, I didn't feel safe walking the seven blocks from The Times office.
IMAGE
August 8, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times
Downtown L.A's Fashion District can be a daunting landscape of concrete and pedestrian traffic. The scene starts with the bustle of ground-floor businesses, most of them having something to do with apparel or accessories — some open to the public, some to wholesalers only. (And some of the businesses don't post "retail" or "wholesale" signs, which can prove frustrating to the newcomer.) In addition to storefronts for shoes, handbags, menswear and women's wear, the more than 4,000 businesses in the district include design offices, sales showrooms, fabric shops and manufacturing facilities that feed California's younger, fashion-forward apparel industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2008 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles and Mark Medina
Retailers are having a tough time this holiday season because of the recession, but stores in downtown L.A.'s Santee Alley got a bit of help over the weekend from police raids that led to the arrests of 28 people for making and selling knockoff goods. Police seized $2.7 million in counterfeit items bearing names such as Air Jordan, Ed Hardy, Coach and Sony in the weekend raids, resulting in the second-largest take of knockoffs in Los Angeles County history, officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Santee Alley: An article in Saturday's California section on officials confiscating counterfeit goods in the downtown Los Angeles shopping district Santee Alley misspelled the last name of City Councilwoman Wendy Greuel as Gruel.
IMAGE
August 8, 2010 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times
Downtown L.A's Fashion District can be a daunting landscape of concrete and pedestrian traffic. The scene starts with the bustle of ground-floor businesses, most of them having something to do with apparel or accessories — some open to the public, some to wholesalers only. (And some of the businesses don't post "retail" or "wholesale" signs, which can prove frustrating to the newcomer.) In addition to storefronts for shoes, handbags, menswear and women's wear, the more than 4,000 businesses in the district include design offices, sales showrooms, fabric shops and manufacturing facilities that feed California's younger, fashion-forward apparel industry.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Mirabelle Vargas, 29, winds her way through the open-air stalls in downtown Los Angeles' bustling Santee Alley, hunting for Victoria's Secret underwear. Or at least undies with a tag that says Victoria's Secret. An authentic pair from the lingerie maker can cost $7.50 and up. But Vargas, a retail sales clerk, managed to find a table brimming with pink-and-white unmentionables. Price: two bucks a pop. "Of course they're not real, not at this price," said Vargas, decked out in a chocolate brown Victoria's Secret tracksuit, also counterfeit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
With the holiday shopping season in full swing, more than 140 law enforcement officers descended on Santee Alley in what officials described as their largest raid ever on the quirky downtown shopping district famous for selling cheap knockoffs. Police and prosecutors on Friday said officers seized more than 50,000 items, including pirated CDs and DVDs as well as near-perfect reproductions of designer merchandise.
IMAGE
August 19, 2007 | Rose Apodaca, Times Staff Writer
ONE hundred George Washingtons hardly go far these days. It doesn't take an accountant to tell you what any clotheshorse worth her shoe collection already knows too well, especially once the shoes, as well as the jewelry and any other touches, are factored in.
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