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Santee Education Complex

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2012 | Steve Lopez
The cafeteria lunch offering at Santee Education Complex on Friday included a sad little hamburger on a bun the color of sawdust, cold sweet potato nuggets and a bag of sliced apples. I had lunch upstairs, in Bistro Mundo, a small cafe run by Santee's culinary arts students. Young chefs cooked and served a lovely French omelet, homemade muffins and a tasty salad that included fresh ingredients grown in their own garden near the athletic fields. The student cooks wore starched white chef jackets, and one of them, 17-year-old Ernesto Calixto, told me over a hot grill that he cooks only with olive oil, because it's healthier.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Joe Zeccola's classroom at Santee Education Complex is crammed full with 43 desks. When class is in session, students occupy every seat. That's the problem, said Zeccola, who teaches freshman English at the secondary school near downtown Los Angeles. Large classes are not conducive to student success. "Unless you're going to give me rollerskates and amphetamines, I don't know how I'm supposed to reach 43 students and add one-on-one interaction," he said. "It's not possible. When they [students]
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2009 | By Amina Khan
When it opened four years ago, Santee Education Complex became known more for its violent beginnings than for its students' forensic skill. In its first week, shots were fired in front of the campus. One day later, a student was arrested outside school with an AK-47. Yet students from the troubled campus, operated by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, now have a reputation to uphold: Santee has been among the winners of the United Nations Foundation Global Debates contest two years running, earning a three-day trip each year to the U.N. in New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The 17-year-old high school senior lives in a neighborhood south of downtown where crime is still high, police sirens are ever-present, and fast-food joints line the block. She rarely leaves the area, never once having been to the beach with her family. But Maria Castro escaped her surroundings last summer and learned new ways to be healthy - physically and mentally. She did yoga and went to a beach in Santa Monica. She cooked organic food for war veterans in Escondido, connecting with their stories of violence and stress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
It's located in a grimy and windowless building that it shares with an adult school on the edge of downtown. But to its students and teachers, the Santee Construction Academy is something of an educational utopia. There are small classes with attentive teachers. A curriculum designed to prepare students for the real world with training for in-demand jobs. An atmosphere that students say is akin to a family. Photos: Santee Construction Academy The campus fits the bill of what some educators and others describe as a model with its career training and staff commitment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The 17-year-old high school senior lives in a neighborhood south of downtown where crime is still high, police sirens are ever-present, and fast-food joints line the block. She rarely leaves the area, never once having been to the beach with her family. But Maria Castro escaped her surroundings last summer and learned new ways to be healthy - physically and mentally. She did yoga and went to a beach in Santa Monica. She cooked organic food for war veterans in Escondido, connecting with their stories of violence and stress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2011 | Steve Lopez
Quietly and carefully, a movement of dissident teachers has been taking shape within United Teachers Los Angeles. It began last fall, with e-mails and telephone calls among a group of disaffected and disappointed teachers. By year's end, some 50 of them had volunteered to become official members of UTLA's policy-making body, the House of Representatives. On Jan. 8, the group held its first strategy session. At the meeting, which I attended, teachers shared their grievances with both UTLA and LAUSD and talked about their plan to lobby for dramatic changes in union leadership and focus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Joe Zeccola's classroom at Santee Education Complex is crammed full with 43 desks. When class is in session, students occupy every seat. That's the problem, said Zeccola, who teaches freshman English at the secondary school near downtown Los Angeles. Large classes are not conducive to student success. "Unless you're going to give me rollerskates and amphetamines, I don't know how I'm supposed to reach 43 students and add one-on-one interaction," he said. "It's not possible. When they [students]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has had a rough enough week. First he took a beating in a poll on his performance, and then, his star tarnished, he announced he would take a rain check on a run for governor. So I hate to be the bearer of more bad news, but I've been gathering up the results of polling at the 10 schools that for the last year have been under the mayor's wing, and there's no way to sugarcoat this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
The struggles of black citizens in South Africa to overcome a brutal government-imposed system of race separation are right out of a history book to a student like Robert Virgen. At 15, the Santee Education Complex sophomore hadn't been born when anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela was released from decades in prison or when the country held its first multiracial elections. But when one of the heroes of that time, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, came to this downtown high school for a Black History Month celebration Thursday, Virgen said he felt a kinship that transcended time, geography and race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2012 | Steve Lopez
The cafeteria lunch offering at Santee Education Complex on Friday included a sad little hamburger on a bun the color of sawdust, cold sweet potato nuggets and a bag of sliced apples. I had lunch upstairs, in Bistro Mundo, a small cafe run by Santee's culinary arts students. Young chefs cooked and served a lovely French omelet, homemade muffins and a tasty salad that included fresh ingredients grown in their own garden near the athletic fields. The student cooks wore starched white chef jackets, and one of them, 17-year-old Ernesto Calixto, told me over a hot grill that he cooks only with olive oil, because it's healthier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
It's located in a grimy and windowless building that it shares with an adult school on the edge of downtown. But to its students and teachers, the Santee Construction Academy is something of an educational utopia. There are small classes with attentive teachers. A curriculum designed to prepare students for the real world with training for in-demand jobs. An atmosphere that students say is akin to a family. Photos: Santee Construction Academy The campus fits the bill of what some educators and others describe as a model with its career training and staff commitment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
The struggles of black citizens in South Africa to overcome a brutal government-imposed system of race separation are right out of a history book to a student like Robert Virgen. At 15, the Santee Education Complex sophomore hadn't been born when anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela was released from decades in prison or when the country held its first multiracial elections. But when one of the heroes of that time, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, came to this downtown high school for a Black History Month celebration Thursday, Virgen said he felt a kinship that transcended time, geography and race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2011 | Steve Lopez
Quietly and carefully, a movement of dissident teachers has been taking shape within United Teachers Los Angeles. It began last fall, with e-mails and telephone calls among a group of disaffected and disappointed teachers. By year's end, some 50 of them had volunteered to become official members of UTLA's policy-making body, the House of Representatives. On Jan. 8, the group held its first strategy session. At the meeting, which I attended, teachers shared their grievances with both UTLA and LAUSD and talked about their plan to lobby for dramatic changes in union leadership and focus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2009 | By Amina Khan
When it opened four years ago, Santee Education Complex became known more for its violent beginnings than for its students' forensic skill. In its first week, shots were fired in front of the campus. One day later, a student was arrested outside school with an AK-47. Yet students from the troubled campus, operated by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's Partnership for Los Angeles Schools, now have a reputation to uphold: Santee has been among the winners of the United Nations Foundation Global Debates contest two years running, earning a three-day trip each year to the U.N. in New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has had a rough enough week. First he took a beating in a poll on his performance, and then, his star tarnished, he announced he would take a rain check on a run for governor. So I hate to be the bearer of more bad news, but I've been gathering up the results of polling at the 10 schools that for the last year have been under the mayor's wing, and there's no way to sugarcoat this.
SPORTS
January 19, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
For the meet-and-greet types, the Dodgers have announced the schedule for their 10th annual community caravan. The caravan begins Monday, with team alumni featured the first four days at one stop per day. On Friday, 15 current players will be joined by Manager Don Mattingly during four stops. Players scheduled to participate Friday include Clayton Kershaw, Javy Guerra, Matt Guerrier, Adrian Gonzalez, Nick Punto, Brandon League, A.J. Ellis, Andre Ethier, Luis Cruz, Hyun-Jin Ryu, Tim Federowicz, Mark Ellis, Skip Schumaker, Shawn Tolleson and Kenley Jansen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Jordan High in Watts will sit out the mayor's school reform effort -- at least for one year -- creating complications and disappointment for Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Wednesday's decision reverses previous announcements from the mayor and the Los Angeles Unified School District, which gave seven schools the opportunity last week to decide whether to join Villaraigosa's Partnership for Los Angeles Schools.
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