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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By David Colker
Katherine Hagedorn was not your stereotypical priestess in the Cuba-based Santeria religion, known for its complex, ecstatic drumming that adherents believe can call forth deities. She grew up in New Jersey, was white, had a doctorate in music and was a longtime popular professor at Pomona College. But as a graduate student on a cold, rainy day at Brown University in 1988, she spotted a poster for an upcoming performance by an Afro-Cuban ensemble of drummers and dancers. The performance changed her life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By David Colker
Katherine Hagedorn was not your stereotypical priestess in the Cuba-based Santeria religion, known for its complex, ecstatic drumming that adherents believe can call forth deities. She grew up in New Jersey, was white, had a doctorate in music and was a longtime popular professor at Pomona College. But as a graduate student on a cold, rainy day at Brown University in 1988, she spotted a poster for an upcoming performance by an Afro-Cuban ensemble of drummers and dancers. The performance changed her life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990
I read with amusement the statements made by Councilman Robert Farrell concerning the ordinance to outlaw animal sacrifices practiced by groups such as satanic cults and Santeria adherents ("Animal Sacrifice Ban Gains," Part B, Sept. 19). Farrell argues that because sacrifice is an expression of people's faith, we must be careful in applying our middle-class standards and consider this a "challenge to the cultural diversity of our city and the tolerance of religious practices." What twaddle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Francisco Aguabella, an Afro-Cuban percussionist considered a master sacred drummer who also had a wide-ranging career in jazz and salsa, has died. He was 84. Aguabella died Friday of cancer at his Los Angeles home, said his daughter Menina Givens. His career "bears testimony to the existence and continuity of a sacred tradition in dancing and music that has been present throughout the development of popular music in the Afro-Cuban style," UC Irvine professor Raul Fernandez said in his 2006 book "From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz."
BOOKS
March 8, 1987 | Mark Schorr
It's a tough life for Holden, the hit man. He commits a contract murder, and is forced to adopt a mysterious little girl who witnessed the crime. The denizens of the Cuban underworld, including practitioners of santeria , Cuban voodoo, are leaving him dead roosters as unexplained threats. All the people he trusts--his partner in the fur business, his lawyer, his informants--are betraying him. He's lost his first love to his boss, an elderly, manipulative Swiss.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1988
In regard to "Power of the Orishas ," by Rick Mitchell (Feb. 7): I believe several million Cubans would be very surprised to learn that they have practiced the religion at one time or another. That is true in the same way in which everyone who has thrown a pinch of salt over his shoulder or carried a rabbit's foot practices witchcraft. It is misleading to describe someone who consults a santero for advice and fortunetelling as someone who practices Santeria, since the implication is that that person advocates the use of animals in ritualistic killing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1988
Let us, as civilized people, immediately make clear that we will not tolerate blood sacrifice of any kind in the name of any "religion." It is appalling to find that this kind of savagery is going on. Santeria is a euphemism for voodoo, and purports to deal in spells, curses and philters. Religious freedom cannot be stretched to include the senseless killing of any creature, lest it later include your pet cat or dog, or yourself. DIANE SILVER Arleta
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | Associated Press
Strangers who burst into a funeral chapel before dawn Wednesday ejected three women who were mourning a relative, then performed Santeria rituals and started a gunfight among themselves, police said. One man was in serious condition after surgery for a gunshot wound to the chest. There were about 10 men in the group that burst into the funeral home in Little Havana. Police would not identify the dead man. "These men started performing Santeria acts to the body of the deceased," said police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987 | From Times staff and wire service reports
City commissioners in Hialeah, Fla., have banned animal sacrifice, an action the Santeria church protests as discriminatory. "It's just a continuing process of religious persecution," said Jorge Duarte, an official of the Santeria church, which combines Roman Catholicism and African tribal beliefs brought to the Caribbean by slaves. It includes the ritual slaughter of chickens, doves, pigs and goats to win favor from the sect's gods.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A public school principal accused of paying a woman to sprinkle chicken blood on the high school in an attempt to cleanse it of negative energy will be fired, the Department of Education said. Maritza Tamayo, principal of the Unity Center for Urban Technologies, paid Gilda Fonte to lead several Santeria religious rituals at the Manhattan school during midwinter break in 2006, when students were not present, according to Richard J.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Jesus Suarez, a Santeria priest, had slit the throat of one goat that June afternoon. He had three more goats, two sheep and 44 chickens to go. But before he could finish the ritual sacrifice, Coral Gables police swarmed the house where he and some 20 other followers of the Afro-Cuban religion had gathered to worship. The officers, Suarez recalls, pointed their guns at the devotees and screamed at them to freeze. Suarez could hear a couple of worshipers in the front yard yelling, "No dispare!"
NATIONAL
August 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A public school principal accused of paying a woman to sprinkle chicken blood on the high school in an attempt to cleanse it of negative energy will be fired, the Department of Education said. Maritza Tamayo, principal of the Unity Center for Urban Technologies, paid Gilda Fonte to lead several Santeria religious rituals at the Manhattan school during midwinter break in 2006, when students were not present, according to Richard J.
SPORTS
June 26, 2007 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
On a shelf in the office of Chicago White Sox Manager Ozzie Guillen, mixed in among the family photos, the Roberto Clemente bobblehead and the Napoleon Dynamite figurine, are four small but intimidating religious icons. "If you see my saints, you'll be like 'Golly, they're ugly,' " Guillen had said before inviting a visitor to come in. "They've got blood. They've got feathers. You go to the Catholic church, the [saints] have got real nice clothes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2005 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
On a hot and yellow Saturday afternoon in Hollywood, a dozen people gathered at a seance for Olga, a young Russian Jew seeking help from Manuel. They sat in the cramped rear room of a botanica shop on Santa Monica Boulevard, before an altar topped with a portrait of Jesus Christ. Charles Guelperin, the Santeria priest, explained the day's aim: "We're doing an investigation of the spirits that work with her, or for her," Guelperin said, his English inflected with his Argentine roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2002 | ANDREA PERERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a patch of forest clustered around the 28-mile marker of Angeles Crest Highway, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputies Randy Rousseau and Shane Maloney point to the dead chicken splayed out in the muddy grass. Alongside the chicken lies a doll fashioned out of burlap and purple ribbon. Up a little farther, red, black and white squares of cloth are scattered on the ground.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Happy holidays. Alex Abella's aptly titled new novel, "Final Acts" (Simon & Schuster, $25, 301 pages), may not be totally appropriate fare for the jolly season, but it's worth picking up in the New Year. In it, Abella lowers the lid on the Pandora's box of murder, mayhem and mysticism he opened nearly a decade ago in "The Killing of the Saints."
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The son of a prominent San Francisco family who dramatically turned his life around after killing his younger sister 25 years ago and stealing to fuel a desperate drug addiction still is not fit to practice law, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. Two state bar courts had ruled that Eben Gossage, 45, should be admitted to the California bar because he had rehabilitated himself after overcoming drug and alcohol addictions. But the Supreme Court, citing 17 criminal convictions of Gossage, overturned those decisions.
NEWS
August 15, 2000 | AL RIDENOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Do as I Say . . . Do as I Say . . . Do as I Say. . . ." The inscription is repeated hypnotically as a mechanized squeegee swipes the ink through the silk screen onto long glass jars. Labeled now, the jars roll down the conveyor belt to be filled with candle wax. They'll be boxed, shipped, shelved, sold . . . and eventually burned by customers who feel the need for a little magic to control their lives (or, in this case, the lives of others).
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