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Santeria Religion

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NEWS
August 9, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Worried about her son, Julie Quijano stopped by the Botanica Ochun on a recent Friday seeking help. "He's 16 years old, and a little wild," she explains. "I just want to calm him down." The man behind the counter of the tiny shop crammed with religious statuettes, potions and amulets recommends a balsamo tranquilo , a calming balm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Francisco Aguabella, an Afro-Cuban percussionist considered a master sacred drummer who also had a wide-ranging career in jazz and salsa, has died. He was 84. Aguabella died Friday of cancer at his Los Angeles home, said his daughter Menina Givens. His career "bears testimony to the existence and continuity of a sacred tradition in dancing and music that has been present throughout the development of popular music in the Afro-Cuban style," UC Irvine professor Raul Fernandez said in his 2006 book "From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bloody, painted cow's tongue found outside the entrance to a welfare office represented "a Santeria or voodoo ritual" but not a death threat, concluded a report by Los Angeles County sheriff's investigators released Thursday. Scraps of paper bearing the names of 14 workers at the county Department of Public and Social Services office were pinned to the yellow-painted tongue, which was discovered hanging from a tree at the department's office on East Avenue K early on July 28.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | Associated Press
Strangers who burst into a funeral chapel before dawn Wednesday ejected three women who were mourning a relative, then performed Santeria rituals and started a gunfight among themselves, police said. One man was in serious condition after surgery for a gunshot wound to the chest. There were about 10 men in the group that burst into the funeral home in Little Havana. Police would not identify the dead man. "These men started performing Santeria acts to the body of the deceased," said police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smiling sweetly, a customer pauses on the threshold of Botanica CB, a narrow shop tucked into the corner of a Santa Ana mini-mall. Glancing inside at a twinkling shrine of St. Lazarus surrounded by Snickers bars and loose change, she crosses herself and enters. She passes rows of spray cans containing potions to attract good luck or ward off evil; black, cobra-shaped candles; and racks of medicinal herbs. Then the woman greets and fondly hugs shop owner Carmen de la Cruz James.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first complaints came when carcasses of chickens, ducks and goats began turning up on lawns, along streets, at cemeteries and in rivers in south Florida. Residents of Hialeah, a Miami suburb, grew angrier when they learned that hundreds of animals were being slaughtered in ritualistic ceremonies by members of an Afro-Caribbean religious sect. In 1987, when a priest in the growing sect announced plans to build a church, the City Council, spurred on by an outraged community, took action.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | Associated Press
Strangers who burst into a funeral chapel before dawn Wednesday ejected three women who were mourning a relative, then performed Santeria rituals and started a gunfight among themselves, police said. One man was in serious condition after surgery for a gunshot wound to the chest. There were about 10 men in the group that burst into the funeral home in Little Havana. Police would not identify the dead man. "These men started performing Santeria acts to the body of the deceased," said police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990
Los Angeles became the first city in the nation Tuesday to ban animal sacrifices under any circumstances, including during religious rituals. The City Council approved an ordinance that makes such killings punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. The only dissenter in the 10-1 vote was Councilman Robert Farrell, who argued that such a law would restrict religious freedoms in immigrant communities, where animal sacrifice is "an expression of people's faith."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
Five misdemeanor counts have been filed against a Hawthorne woman accused of keeping a yard full of malnourished and lice-infested animals, which authorities suspect were to be used in religious sacrifices. Catalina Sierra, 55, will be arraigned Aug. 15 in Inglewood Municipal Court on charges of animal cruelty and illegally keeping barnyard animals in a residential neighborhood. If convicted of all counts, she could be sentenced to up to four years in jail, Hawthorne Assistant City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday ordered an investigation into ritualistic animal sacrifices in religious ceremonies and indicated they may legislate against the practice. "I do not believe we should tolerate animals to be used for sacrifice in some religions," Supervisor Kenneth Hahn said. "I think we should thoroughly investigate this and stop it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bloody, painted cow's tongue found outside the entrance to a welfare office represented "a Santeria or voodoo ritual" but not a death threat, concluded a report by Los Angeles County sheriff's investigators released Thursday. Scraps of paper bearing the names of 14 workers at the county Department of Public and Social Services office were pinned to the yellow-painted tongue, which was discovered hanging from a tree at the department's office on East Avenue K early on July 28.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1997 | KIMBERLY SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a blue gingham dress, kerchief and flip-flops, a life-size mannequin representing an ancient African spirit sits in the corner of Botanica San Jose, keeping watch over the shop. Nearby, a 4-foot statue of Lazarus, patron of the sick and poor, hangs in the window. On the counter two candles burn--one for Lazarus, the other for St. Simon, a Catholic saint and one of the 12 apostles.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Worried about her son, Julie Quijano stopped by the Botanica Ochun on a recent Friday seeking help. "He's 16 years old, and a little wild," she explains. "I just want to calm him down." The man behind the counter of the tiny shop crammed with religious statuettes, potions and amulets recommends a balsamo tranquilo , a calming balm.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong defense of religious freedom for even the most unpopular sects, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously Friday that a Florida city may not suppress an African religion by banning the ritual sacrifice of animals. No religion or religious practice may be "singled out for discriminatory treatment," the high court said, even if its activities are viewed as "abhorrent" by most. The Constitution "commits government itself to religious tolerance," Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said for the court.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music of maracas and a conga drum accompanied a young woman singing in the African language of Yoruba. Her song was a deep, staccato call to the world of spirits. Beside her, a 37-year-old fisherman rose from a red throne to dance for Chango, the warrior god of fire and thunder. The man swung a wooden ax to the beat and bobbed his shaved and painted head. The air was thick with the smell of frying goat and mutton, animals sacrificed for Chango the previous night.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first complaints came when carcasses of chickens, ducks and goats began turning up on lawns, along streets, at cemeteries and in rivers in south Florida. Residents of Hialeah, a Miami suburb, grew angrier when they learned that hundreds of animals were being slaughtered in ritualistic ceremonies by members of an Afro-Caribbean religious sect. In 1987, when a priest in the growing sect announced plans to build a church, the City Council, spurred on by an outraged community, took action.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music of maracas and a conga drum accompanied a young woman singing in the African language of Yoruba. Her song was a deep, staccato call to the world of spirits. Beside her, a 37-year-old fisherman rose from a red throne to dance for Chango, the warrior god of fire and thunder. The man swung a wooden ax to the beat and bobbed his shaved and painted head. The air was thick with the smell of frying goat and mutton, animals sacrificed for Chango the previous night.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong defense of religious freedom for even the most unpopular sects, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously Friday that a Florida city may not suppress an African religion by banning the ritual sacrifice of animals. No religion or religious practice may be "singled out for discriminatory treatment," the high court said, even if its activities are viewed as "abhorrent" by most. The Constitution "commits government itself to religious tolerance," Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said for the court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990
Los Angeles became the first city in the nation Tuesday to ban animal sacrifices under any circumstances, including during religious rituals. The City Council approved an ordinance that makes such killings punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000. The only dissenter in the 10-1 vote was Councilman Robert Farrell, who argued that such a law would restrict religious freedoms in immigrant communities, where animal sacrifice is "an expression of people's faith."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to curb an increase in ritual animal sacrifices, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday gave tentative approval to an ordinance that would ban occult-style slaughter and make such killings punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.
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