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Santiago Calatrava

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004
Architect honored: Santiago Calatrava, whose work includes the designs for the Olympic Stadium in Athens and the World Trade Center Transportation Hub in New York, was named winner of the 2005 Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects, given for a body of work that "has had a lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2005 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has held just two architecture exhibitions over the last 35 years: one on Marcel Breuer and the other on Charles Rennie Mackintosh. These days, however, in an age of high-wattage architectural celebrity, any museum that doesn't tap into the growing public fascination with the field risks looking behind the times. And so today brings the opening of "Santiago Calatrava: Sculpture Into Architecture," a show that is modest in size but tellingly opportunistic.
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OPINION
July 10, 2004
The picture of the Redding Bridge over the Sacramento River that ran July 5 ("A Bridge to the Future in Redding") should remind everyone that architecture, a practical art, can be exquisitely beautiful. Santiago Calatrava, the Spanish architect who designed this masterpiece, took a truly pedestrian project -- a pedestrian bridge -- supported it with a shining harp of steel cables and brought the considerable forces involved back to Earth in a tower that is a world of structural sculpture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2004 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Ask lawmakers whether their votes are for sale, and the answer is: absolutely not. But come budget time, they can be flexible on that point. Consider Maurice Johannessen, a legislator from far Northern California until his Senate term ended two years ago. Johannessen was one of a handful of Republicans who regularly bolted from his party to help Democrats get state budgets passed. That's how he became a master at delivering to folks back home what he called "district augmentations" and others describe as Projects of Regional Concern -- PORC for short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2004 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
A few days ago, he was in the Netherlands, surrounded by Dutch royalty and assorted European culturati, for the gala dedication of three new spans he designed. But it was nothing, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava said, compared to the stirring Fourth of July bridge opening here Sunday. Local boosters are hoping the soaring new $23.
OPINION
April 7, 1996 | Michael Webb, Michael Webb is the author of "The City Square" (Whitney Library of Design) and "Architects Guide to Los Angeles" (AIA, Los Angeles)
You don't have to be religious to feel uplifted by the great cathedrals of Europe and Latin America. Monuments of an age of faith, they still reach out to everyone, anchoring city centers, providing serene retreats from the bustle of daily life and making ageless beauty universally accessible. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Los Angeles, plans to dedicate a new cathedral in the year 2000, as a spiritual and civic focus for downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2004 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Ask lawmakers whether their votes are for sale, and the answer is: absolutely not. But come budget time, they can be flexible on that point. Consider Maurice Johannessen, a legislator from far Northern California until his Senate term ended two years ago. Johannessen was one of a handful of Republicans who regularly bolted from his party to help Democrats get state budgets passed. That's how he became a master at delivering to folks back home what he called "district augmentations" and others describe as Projects of Regional Concern -- PORC for short.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2004 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
A stunning composition of structure and light, Santiago Calatrava's design for a $2-billion railway station at the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan is the most compelling evidence yet that meaningful architecture will play a role in one of the most politically charged developments in the country's history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2005 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Museum of Art has held just two architecture exhibitions over the last 35 years: one on Marcel Breuer and the other on Charles Rennie Mackintosh. These days, however, in an age of high-wattage architectural celebrity, any museum that doesn't tap into the growing public fascination with the field risks looking behind the times. And so today brings the opening of "Santiago Calatrava: Sculpture Into Architecture," a show that is modest in size but tellingly opportunistic.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava unveiled his blueprint for the World Trade Center site's new commuter terminal, a pavilion mirroring the outstretched wings of a bird He designed the New York City station as an open-air gateway, where light will fall 60 feet through ribbed, transparent canopies. The $2-billion center will also feature a movable dome that will mechanically open to the sky each year on Sept. 11, in a memorial to the victims of the 2001 terrorist attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004
Architect honored: Santiago Calatrava, whose work includes the designs for the Olympic Stadium in Athens and the World Trade Center Transportation Hub in New York, was named winner of the 2005 Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects, given for a body of work that "has had a lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture."
OPINION
July 10, 2004
The picture of the Redding Bridge over the Sacramento River that ran July 5 ("A Bridge to the Future in Redding") should remind everyone that architecture, a practical art, can be exquisitely beautiful. Santiago Calatrava, the Spanish architect who designed this masterpiece, took a truly pedestrian project -- a pedestrian bridge -- supported it with a shining harp of steel cables and brought the considerable forces involved back to Earth in a tower that is a world of structural sculpture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2004 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
A few days ago, he was in the Netherlands, surrounded by Dutch royalty and assorted European culturati, for the gala dedication of three new spans he designed. But it was nothing, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava said, compared to the stirring Fourth of July bridge opening here Sunday. Local boosters are hoping the soaring new $23.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2004 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
A stunning composition of structure and light, Santiago Calatrava's design for a $2-billion railway station at the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan is the most compelling evidence yet that meaningful architecture will play a role in one of the most politically charged developments in the country's history.
OPINION
April 7, 1996 | Michael Webb, Michael Webb is the author of "The City Square" (Whitney Library of Design) and "Architects Guide to Los Angeles" (AIA, Los Angeles)
You don't have to be religious to feel uplifted by the great cathedrals of Europe and Latin America. Monuments of an age of faith, they still reach out to everyone, anchoring city centers, providing serene retreats from the bustle of daily life and making ageless beauty universally accessible. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Los Angeles, plans to dedicate a new cathedral in the year 2000, as a spiritual and civic focus for downtown Los Angeles.
SPORTS
June 29, 2004 | From Associated Press
Construction at the main Olympic sports complex will be finished just before the opening ceremony for the Athens Games. The stadium has been beset by major delays, but Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava says not to worry. "Everything will be completed the day before the start of the Games," Calatrava told the Athens daily Eleftheros Typos on Monday. Calatrava's comments seem to contradict promises by Greek officials to finish the complex in mid-July for the Aug. 13-29 Games.
TRAVEL
November 10, 2002
France: Southwest coast Hotel Central, 3Bd Commandant Passicot, St. Jean de Luz; 011-33-559-26-31-99, fax 011-33-5-59-51-05-61, www.hotel-central-stjeandeluz.com. "Outstanding small hotel on a beautiful crescent beach in lovely St. Jean de Luz, on the Bay of Biscay. Hosts Elizabeth and Phillippe Hardy make things easy for English-only speakers." Doubles, with breakfast buffet, start at $58. Bill and Jean Davenport, Santa Ana * Oregon: Fine dining Gogi's Restaurant, 235 W. Main St.
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