Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSantora Arts Complex
IN THE NEWS

Santora Arts Complex

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1995
Your Oct. 8 article on Santa Ana's Artists Village is incorrect in one important respect. Contrary to express statements made in the article, the Artists Village is not, to any meaningful extent, "publicly funded." The article recaps public controversy over a single work of art created by local artist Connie Sasso. No public funds went into the creation of the work of art, the establishment or maintenance of Ms. Sasso's gallery or, for that matter, the establishment or maintenance of the Santora Arts Complex, which houses her gallery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Artistically speaking, it can take a village to raise a city--and in the case of Santa Ana, the Artists Village at Santora Arts Complex and environs may do the trick. One unoccupied storefront sports the slogan "SoHo, So What?" AFTERNOON: 1, 2, 3 Historic buildings house scores of studios and galleries. Many studios at the Santora Arts Complex, which has been open since July 1995, are working spaces, and artists' hours can be random. Thanks to picture windows, some displays are always visible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Hoping to capitalize on what they say is the growing success of the loose-knit Artists Village, city officials have voted to seek a developer for the first live-in work space of its type downtown. More than 50 artists already lease work space in privately owned local buildings such as the Santora Arts Complex, Empire Market and Hervey-Finley, according to a city staff report.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is humor, conscious and unconscious, in Luis Olivos Jr.'s brief cabaret, "Dia de los Muertos," at the Chicano Latino Collective Gallery. But that's about all. The emcee, Cantinflas (Olivos), stands before a microphone and sort of guides things along, with his cast strung out behind him in a line. They are celebrities of the past who, like Cantinflas, have returned to observe this special Latino holiday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crouching inside Skeith DeWine's art gallery in Santa Ana is a lot like falling down Alice's rabbit hole. Reality is warped. You're a giant in a tiny box. Located under a stairwell that leads to the basement of the Santora Arts Complex, the gallery was a utility room filled with trash, mice and wasps. Enter owner and local portrait painter DeWine, who revamped the space he has named "The Smallest Art Gallery in California."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1999
Pop/Rock * Squeeze, Julia Darling and Nick Harper play at the Sun Theatre, 2200 E. Katella Ave., Anaheim. 8 tonight. $28.50. (714) 712-2700. * The Damned, Diablo 44 and Doppleganger play at the Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana. 8 tonight. $22.50 to $24.50. (714) 957-0600. * John Taylor, Redshift and the Rick Monroe Band play at the Coach House, 33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano. 8 tonight. $19.50 to $21.50. (949) 496-8930.
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crouching inside Skeith DeWine's art gallery in Santa Ana is a lot like falling down Alice's rabbit hole. Reality is warped. You're a giant in a tiny box. Located under a stairwell that leads to the basement of the Santora Arts Complex, the gallery was a utility room filled with trash, mice and wasps. Enter owner and local portrait painter DeWine, who revamped the space he has named "The Smallest Art Gallery in California." "People [want] new ways to look at art--on computers, on the streets, buses and big audacious galleries and museums that are like giant cathedrals where the art gets lost," said DeWine, a 32-year-old Santa Ana resident who tends bar by day. He's not sure it's the smallest anywhere, but it certainly is Guinness-book tiny.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Connie Sasso became a sudden target of controversy in July when City Councilman Ted R. Morino decried one of her works--a storefront installation of sealed jars filled with honey and condoms and girded with rosaries--as "obscene, crude and sacrilegious." Because the piece was at the Santora Arts Complex--part of the downtown Artists' Village, a recipient of city subsidies and public relations support--Morino called for a community review panel to monitor viewers' complaints.
NEWS
October 8, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A display of condoms floating in 19 jars of honey, shown at a summer art exhibit here, stirred up a brief tempest that has left the community with unexpected and lingering questions about artistic freedom and censorship. The protest over the display, titled "Our Dilemma," is giving the city's fledgling arts colony--the first such publicly funded enterprise in Orange County--its first real recognition and, some say, validity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|