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NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
TourCrafters is offering reasonably priced excursions to Greece that combine a stay in Athens with an Aegean cruise that allows you to sample some of the country's popular islands. The "Iconic Aegean" package includes two nights in Athens, with time to take in the Acropolis as well as an evening of dancing and bouzouki music. The four-day cruise makes stops at Mykonos, Patmos and the Monastery of St. John the Theologian, Rhodes and the village of Lindos and the medieval Old Town, Crete and Santorini.
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FOOD
April 5, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
I have such a strong memory of nibbling on charred octopus tentacles between sips of ouzo on a terrace overlooking the sea in Santorini. Much as I've tried, I haven't turned up that particular way of eating octopus in SoCal. The good news, though, is that lately the tasty cephalopod is showing up on more local menus - not only at Mediterranean restaurants but also at places with Mexican and Peruvian dishes. It's about time. Picca Peruvian Cantina At this exuberant Peruvian cantina, one of the standbys on the menu is chef-owner Ricardo Zarate's anticucho de pulpo - a small dish of boiled octopus marinated in lots of Peruvian chiles accented with oregano and cumin, then grilled over charcoal on the robata . It's served with baked and fried Kennebec potatoes and drizzled with a fiery rocoto rustico , a sauce of jalapeƱo and Peruvian black mint.
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NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
After working with Manfred and Elaine Krankl as assistant winemaker at Sine Qua Non for 10 years, Maggie Harrison struck out on her own in 2005. She landed in Oregon where as co-owner, winemaker and vineyard manager at the small Antica Terra in the Willamette Valley, her focus is strictly Pinot Noir. Talking to me last week, she said it's been a long winter. And every year at this time, just as the Willamette Valley is emerging from a winter-like spring and the sun starts to come out, she and her husband Michael can't stop drinking wines from the islands.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
TourCrafters is offering reasonably priced excursions to Greece that combine a stay in Athens with an Aegean cruise that allows you to sample some of the country's popular islands. The "Iconic Aegean" package includes two nights in Athens, with time to take in the Acropolis as well as an evening of dancing and bouzouki music. The four-day cruise makes stops at Mykonos, Patmos and the Monastery of St. John the Theologian, Rhodes and the village of Lindos and the medieval Old Town, Crete and Santorini.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2012
Advice wellworth sharing I so agree with Christopher Reynolds' advice ["Next Stop: Somewhere Else," June 24]. My two grown children have always said one of the best gifts I've given them is the love of travel. To initiate them, I told them their high school graduation presents would be trips abroad. My son's was a month's backpacking in Europe on his own. He made friends at youth hostels and learned to make the most of his Eurail Pass, as well as to stay within his per diem budget.
TRAVEL
December 14, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers.
While the Western World is forever indebted to the full flowering of Greek philosophy and culture beginning about 500 BC, another highly developed civilization had already flourished 1,500 years earlier on Crete, the largest island of the Eastern Mediterranean. The refinements and artistic achievements of the Minoan culture, best exemplified by the exquisite Palace of Minos at nearby Knossos, probably began as early as 6000 BC.
TRAVEL
March 9, 1986
After reading "Footloose in Santorini" by Beverly Beyer and Ed Rabey (Feb. 9) we have come to the conclusion that there must be two Santorini. We were there 12 years ago and, of course, took the donkey ride from the harbor-side to the main village 900 feet up. They start out by saying " . . . foolhardy is the only word for one who would honor this hoary tradition twice." They go on to call it a "terrifying ordeal to unhinge the most valiant." Nobody in our mostly senior citizens group found it so. Not even the little old widow in her 80s. They go on to say that the skinners drive the scruffy beasts ever upward with the harsh whack of a 2x4. We did not witness any such animal abuse.
TRAVEL
April 1, 1990 | JEFF HALSTEAD, Halstead is a free-lance writer living in Spokane, Wash. and
Tiers of volcanic strata, jutting 600 feet from the sea, dwarfed our steamer as we entered the watery caldera of the Greek island of Santorini. Strange white trimming on the crater's north lip at first resembled autumn snow. But the ship's persistent plodding soon brought into focus a tangle of Santorini's white homes and domed churches, glued to the cliffs like swallows' nests.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a Saturday night, we are at the Santorini Greek Island Restaurant in Torrance, where a belly dancer is entertaining the next table. A white-haired man is trying to figure out where and how to tuck a dollar bill into the dancer's costume: He waves it, she shimmies in response. He reaches tentatively toward her jiggling chest, rethinks it, aims instead for her undulating hip.
TRAVEL
August 1, 1999 | MICHAEL KENYON, Michael Kenyon is a freelance writer in Southampton, N.Y
We are on Atlantis, the lost continent, gazing dazedly from the veranda of our hotel room (yes, gentle reader, Atlantis has hotels) at the flat roof terraces below, blindingly whitewashed, dappled with parasols, the milk-white expanses punctuated by apricot and azure domes of churches flying the Greek flag. Below and beyond this panorama of sunbaked buildings and cliffs, the glassy, indigo wilderness of the Aegean Sea shimmers under the rays of Phoebus' fiery chariot.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
After working with Manfred and Elaine Krankl as assistant winemaker at Sine Qua Non for 10 years, Maggie Harrison struck out on her own in 2005. She landed in Oregon where as co-owner, winemaker and vineyard manager at the small Antica Terra in the Willamette Valley, her focus is strictly Pinot Noir. Talking to me last week, she said it's been a long winter. And every year at this time, just as the Willamette Valley is emerging from a winter-like spring and the sun starts to come out, she and her husband Michael can't stop drinking wines from the islands.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2012
Advice wellworth sharing I so agree with Christopher Reynolds' advice ["Next Stop: Somewhere Else," June 24]. My two grown children have always said one of the best gifts I've given them is the love of travel. To initiate them, I told them their high school graduation presents would be trips abroad. My son's was a month's backpacking in Europe on his own. He made friends at youth hostels and learned to make the most of his Eurail Pass, as well as to stay within his per diem budget.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
There we stood, on the side of a highway on this Aegean island's wine country. We were stranded. Darkness was about to fall. I glanced at Peggy, my buddy through thick and thin. Returning a worried look, she nodded. We turned to the traffic and struck the pose: right arm out, thumb up. Cars whizzed by. Some were packed with no room for more, but solo drivers also ignored our gesticulations. Were we invisible?
TRAVEL
August 1, 1999 | MICHAEL KENYON, Michael Kenyon is a freelance writer in Southampton, N.Y
We are on Atlantis, the lost continent, gazing dazedly from the veranda of our hotel room (yes, gentle reader, Atlantis has hotels) at the flat roof terraces below, blindingly whitewashed, dappled with parasols, the milk-white expanses punctuated by apricot and azure domes of churches flying the Greek flag. Below and beyond this panorama of sunbaked buildings and cliffs, the glassy, indigo wilderness of the Aegean Sea shimmers under the rays of Phoebus' fiery chariot.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a Saturday night, we are at the Santorini Greek Island Restaurant in Torrance, where a belly dancer is entertaining the next table. A white-haired man is trying to figure out where and how to tuck a dollar bill into the dancer's costume: He waves it, she shimmies in response. He reaches tentatively toward her jiggling chest, rethinks it, aims instead for her undulating hip.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Walking into Cafe Santorini makes me feel I'm in a romance/espionage film. One goes down an alley and up a flight of stairs before surfacing at this small, handsome Mediterranean restaurant. On warm days, the patio's the place to sit--a crow's-nest perched over an Old Pasadena plaza containing Il Fornaio, Banana Republic, the AMC theaters and Crate and Barrel.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Walking into Cafe Santorini makes me feel I'm in a romance/espionage film. One goes down an alley and up a flight of stairs before surfacing at this small, handsome Mediterranean restaurant. On warm days, the patio's the place to sit--a crow's-nest perched over an Old Pasadena plaza containing Il Fornaio, Banana Republic, the AMC theaters and Crate and Barrel.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
There we stood, on the side of a highway on this Aegean island's wine country. We were stranded. Darkness was about to fall. I glanced at Peggy, my buddy through thick and thin. Returning a worried look, she nodded. We turned to the traffic and struck the pose: right arm out, thumb up. Cars whizzed by. Some were packed with no room for more, but solo drivers also ignored our gesticulations. Were we invisible?
TRAVEL
April 1, 1990 | JEFF HALSTEAD, Halstead is a free-lance writer living in Spokane, Wash. and
Tiers of volcanic strata, jutting 600 feet from the sea, dwarfed our steamer as we entered the watery caldera of the Greek island of Santorini. Strange white trimming on the crater's north lip at first resembled autumn snow. But the ship's persistent plodding soon brought into focus a tangle of Santorini's white homes and domed churches, glued to the cliffs like swallows' nests.
TRAVEL
December 14, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers.
While the Western World is forever indebted to the full flowering of Greek philosophy and culture beginning about 500 BC, another highly developed civilization had already flourished 1,500 years earlier on Crete, the largest island of the Eastern Mediterranean. The refinements and artistic achievements of the Minoan culture, best exemplified by the exquisite Palace of Minos at nearby Knossos, probably began as early as 6000 BC.
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