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Sanwa Securities Co

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BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Sanwa Employee Files Sex Discrimination Suit: Janice Harmeier, a former vice president and market strategist at Sanwa Securities Co. in New York, the U.S. brokerage arm of Sanwa Bank of Japan, filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in New York. Harmeier alleges that she was denied equal pay and that the company knowingly created an atmosphere of open, widespread sexual discrimination. She seeks damages of more than $4 million. Sanwa officials were not immediately available for comment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1992 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six investment and banking firms and four individuals associated with convicted money manager Steven D. Wymer are being sued by the city of Torrance in an attempt to recover $6.2 million lost in an investment scandal. Wymer, 44, who once managed $1.2 billion through his Newport Beach investment company, pleaded guilty in September to defrauding millions of dollars from dozens of government agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fourteen banking and investment associates of convicted money manager Steven D. Wymer have been sued by the city of Orange in an attempt to recover $7 million lost when Wymer defrauded the city. Investment adviser Wymer pleaded guilty in September to engineering a giant fraud involving small government agencies in what federal prosecutors termed "one of the most significant and financially devastating" cases of fraud. Wymer, 44, who once managed $1.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing the lawsuits over Orange County's 1994 financial collapse nearly to an end, a dozen Wall Street firms agreed to pay the county $20.8 million Monday for their roles in the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. The settlements increase the county's total recovery to $860.6 million--about half of what it lost in 1994 on investments that backfired.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The U.S. economy picked up steam in June, according to economic reports released Friday, fueled by a jump in orders for big-ticket items such as cars and appliances. Durable goods orders far surpassed most economists' forecasts, while a separate report on sales of existing homes showed the housing market, though off slightly, still keeping pace with its recent strong levels. Meanwhile, the California Assn. of Realtors reported that the median price of a single-family home in California rose 4.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The U.S. economy picked up steam in June, according to economic reports released Friday, fueled by a jump in orders for big-ticket items such as cars and appliances. Durable goods orders far surpassed most economists' forecasts, while a separate report on sales of existing homes showed the housing market, though off slightly, still keeping pace with its recent strong levels. Meanwhile, the California Assn. of Realtors reported that the median price of a single-family home in California rose 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing lawsuits over Orange County's financial collapse nearly to a close, a dozen Wall Street firms agreed to pay Orange County $20.8 million Monday for their roles in the nation's largest municipal bankruptcy. The settlements increase the county's total recovery to $860.6 million--about half of what it lost in 1994 on investments that backfired. The firms that settled Monday were accused of contributing to the debacle by providing credit or risky securities to then-Treasurer Robert L.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending the only federal case against a brokerage linked to Orange County's bankruptcy, a Wall Street firm and two employees agreed Thursday to pay $870,000 to settle charges they failed to disclose the risks of investing in county bonds. The Securities and Exchange Commission had accused C.S. First Boston Corp. of intentional fraud and reckless conduct in helping the county sell $110 million in pensions bonds just before it declared bankruptcy in December 1994.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another major victory in Orange County's war to recover bankruptcy losses, two more brokerages agreed Tuesday to pay $117.5 million to settle their share of the blame for the 1994 financial fiasco. Morgan Stanley Dean Witter & Co. and Nomura Securities International Inc. both denied wrongdoing and said they had settled because of the uncertainty of legal action.
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