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Saoirse Ronan

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Shortly after she received an Oscar nomination at the tender age of 13, "Atonement" star Saoirse Ronan needed a new movie. Despite a drama background, she was intrigued by the title character in "Hanna," an ethereally beautiful teen who also happens to be a ruthless assassin. But the project was stuck in development at Focus Features; filmmakers like Danny Boyle had come and gone. Ronan had a simple solution: "They said they didn't have a director," the Irish actress (first name SER-sha)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
It may have won one of America's most prestigious awards for young people's literature, but it's British fans who will get to see the movie first. Meg Rosoff's Printz Award-winning "How I Live Now" should have all the elements for the typical YA film adaptation: war, dystopia, a great lead actress in Academy Award nominee Saoirse Ronan ("Atonement"), and director Kevin Macdonald ("The Last King of Scotland"), who won an Oscar for his 1999 documentary "One Day in September," behind the camera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2009 | By Yvonne Villarreal >>>
Don't call her the new it girl. She'll fidget with her sleeves; the pressure makes her a bit squeamish. The new lit girl? She's OK with that. Saoirse (pronounced SIR-sha) Ronan burst onto the scene at 13 with her Academy Award-nominated performance in the cinematic adaptation of Ian McEwan's " Atonement." She played Briony in the period drama -- a child who meddles in her sister's love affair, causing devastating results -- and held her own opposite the film's lead actors, Keira Knightley and James McAvoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Film Critic
"Byzantium" is a very different sort of vampire drama for director Neil Jordan, whose undead were so fabulously rich and fashion-forward in "Interview With the Vampire" so many years ago. This vision of the immortal has more of an Irish fable quality, complete with swirling mists, choppy seas and the grit of hard lives. The movie's stars are haunting as well. Saoirse Ronan and Gemma Arterton portray daughter and mother vampires on the run, bound and torn in ways that mothers and daughters always are. PHOTOS: Are vampires sexy or not sexy?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Hanna" starts off like a house afire but soon burns itself out. Blessed with considerable virtues, including a clever concept, crackling filmmaking and a charismatic star, it ultimately squanders all of them, undone by an unfortunate lack of subtlety and restraint. Subtlety and restraint may sound like odd things to look for in an adrenalized thriller about a teenage girl who's been trained as a world-class assassin. But when you consider the "Bourne" trilogy, the class acts of contemporary thrillers, those films were smart enough never to be crude and heavy-handed with their characters, a trap the caricature-heavy "Hanna" does not even attempt to avoid.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2007 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
"She was one of those children possessed by a desire to have the world just so," writes Ian McEwan in his novel "Atonement." He is describing 13-year-old Briony Tallis, one of recent literature's most maddening heroines, brainy but impetuous, controlling but immature and blind to the cues of her heart and others'.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | Jim Brooks, Times Staff Writer
HOLLYWOOD -- bright lights, big city . . . small town? Apparently so, if you look at this year's Oscar acting nominations. The Screen Actors Guild may have some 120,000 members, but this year's nominees seem to be swimming in an awfully small bowl. So, in a tip of the top hat to the never-been-nominated Kevin Bacon, we went fishing for six or fewer degrees of separation among the class of 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
It may have won one of America's most prestigious awards for young people's literature, but it's British fans who will get to see the movie first. Meg Rosoff's Printz Award-winning "How I Live Now" should have all the elements for the typical YA film adaptation: war, dystopia, a great lead actress in Academy Award nominee Saoirse Ronan ("Atonement"), and director Kevin Macdonald ("The Last King of Scotland"), who won an Oscar for his 1999 documentary "One Day in September," behind the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Roger Ebert's  last review published before he died Thursday was on Andrew Niccol's "The Host. " It makes you wish the final words of the beloved critic could have been spent on a film that was far better -- or far worse. The 70-year-old critic wrote a mere six paragraphs about the adaptation of the Stephenie Meyer bestseller, giving the film 2 1/2 stars. "The Host" centers on a tough-minded teenager, played by Saoirse Ronan, whose body is invaded by an alien soul, yet she retains her own identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Noel Murray
Avatar 20th Century Fox, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 To some, the idea of watching James Cameron's mega-grossing sci-fi action epic "Avatar" at home -- on a small screen and in crummy ol' 2-D -- will seem about as appealing as being stuck in a human body instead of one of those tall blue Pandora models. Yet even at reduced size, "Avatar" is quite the spectacle, with interplanetary landscapes that look like Yes album covers, and an ecology-minded plot that's as rousing as it is corny.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Of all the things I imagined Oscar-winner Geoffrey Fletcher might choose for his directing debut, "Violet & Daisy," the story of two teenage assassins on the loose in New York City, was not on the list. Fletcher, who won the Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of Sapphire's searing novel "Precious," once again delves into the lives of teens in troubled situations in "Violet & Daisy. " But any other comparisons end there. Instead of the capacity of the human spirit to soar against impossible odds that defined "Precious," Fletcher, as both writer and director, is interested in the whys and wherefores of girls who blow giant pink bubble-gum bubbles that pop in sync with their gun blasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
At the Cannes Film Festival this week, Ryan Gosling's new film "Only God Forgives" inspired a divisive reaction among critics. Some audience members even booed the violent movie, directed by Nicolas Winding Refn. But Gosling, who is busy filming his directorial debut "How to Catch a Monster" thousands of miles away in Detroit, doesn't seem to be losing any sleep over the negative response.  "He never would have gone to Cannes and left this set -- this is his baby," said Saoirse Ronan, who has a role in Gosling's film, which stars Christina Hendricks as a single mother whose teenage son stumbles across an eerie underwater town.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Roger Ebert's  last review published before he died Thursday was on Andrew Niccol's "The Host. " It makes you wish the final words of the beloved critic could have been spent on a film that was far better -- or far worse. The 70-year-old critic wrote a mere six paragraphs about the adaptation of the Stephenie Meyer bestseller, giving the film 2 1/2 stars. "The Host" centers on a tough-minded teenager, played by Saoirse Ronan, whose body is invaded by an alien soul, yet she retains her own identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Saoirse (pronounced SIR-sha, "like inertia") Ronan plays an alien and a human in the same body in the new romantic sci-fi film "The Host," based on a book by "Twilight" series author Stephenie Meyer. Ronan, who turns 19 in April, is already a seasoned thespian, with an Oscar nod for her performance in 2007's "Atonement. " Are you a fan of the "Twilight" vampire romance book and film series and its author, Stephenie Meyer? Is that what drew you to "The Host"? Yes, that was definitely one of the draws for me to work with Stephenie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Hanna" starts off like a house afire but soon burns itself out. Blessed with considerable virtues, including a clever concept, crackling filmmaking and a charismatic star, it ultimately squanders all of them, undone by an unfortunate lack of subtlety and restraint. Subtlety and restraint may sound like odd things to look for in an adrenalized thriller about a teenage girl who's been trained as a world-class assassin. But when you consider the "Bourne" trilogy, the class acts of contemporary thrillers, those films were smart enough never to be crude and heavy-handed with their characters, a trap the caricature-heavy "Hanna" does not even attempt to avoid.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Shortly after she received an Oscar nomination at the tender age of 13, "Atonement" star Saoirse Ronan needed a new movie. Despite a drama background, she was intrigued by the title character in "Hanna," an ethereally beautiful teen who also happens to be a ruthless assassin. But the project was stuck in development at Focus Features; filmmakers like Danny Boyle had come and gone. Ronan had a simple solution: "They said they didn't have a director," the Irish actress (first name SER-sha)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Of all the things I imagined Oscar-winner Geoffrey Fletcher might choose for his directing debut, "Violet & Daisy," the story of two teenage assassins on the loose in New York City, was not on the list. Fletcher, who won the Oscar for his screenplay adaptation of Sapphire's searing novel "Precious," once again delves into the lives of teens in troubled situations in "Violet & Daisy. " But any other comparisons end there. Instead of the capacity of the human spirit to soar against impossible odds that defined "Precious," Fletcher, as both writer and director, is interested in the whys and wherefores of girls who blow giant pink bubble-gum bubbles that pop in sync with their gun blasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009 | By Rachel Abramowitz
In Alice Sebold's bestselling book "The Lovely Bones," after 14-year-old Susie Salmon is raped and murdered by her next-to-door neighbor, she ends up in the afterworld, not quite heaven, but a sort of cosmic way station that looks much like Susie's old terrestrial stomping grounds -- a typical American suburb, with a junior high school, subdivisions and a mall. In Peter Jackson's film version of "The Lovely Bones," currently in L.A. theaters, Susie's netherworld is an extension of her subconscious, full of trippy dream imagery of extraordinary mountains and forest, giant oversized camellias, mammoth boats in glass bottles and a spooky gazebo in a field of corn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Noel Murray
Avatar 20th Century Fox, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 To some, the idea of watching James Cameron's mega-grossing sci-fi action epic "Avatar" at home -- on a small screen and in crummy ol' 2-D -- will seem about as appealing as being stuck in a human body instead of one of those tall blue Pandora models. Yet even at reduced size, "Avatar" is quite the spectacle, with interplanetary landscapes that look like Yes album covers, and an ecology-minded plot that's as rousing as it is corny.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009 | By Rachel Abramowitz
In Alice Sebold's bestselling book "The Lovely Bones," after 14-year-old Susie Salmon is raped and murdered by her next-to-door neighbor, she ends up in the afterworld, not quite heaven, but a sort of cosmic way station that looks much like Susie's old terrestrial stomping grounds -- a typical American suburb, with a junior high school, subdivisions and a mall. In Peter Jackson's film version of "The Lovely Bones," currently in L.A. theaters, Susie's netherworld is an extension of her subconscious, full of trippy dream imagery of extraordinary mountains and forest, giant oversized camellias, mammoth boats in glass bottles and a spooky gazebo in a field of corn.
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