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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1987
In reponse to the birth of the 5-billionth human: The ultimate hubris is for an animal that continues its uncontrolled breeding habits, despite massive environmental degradation, resource depletion, poverty, hunger and extinction of other life forms, to call itself "sapiens!" SUSU LEVY Encino
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SCIENCE
November 16, 2012 | Monte Morin
It was among early man's greatest technological feats: a fully engineered weapon that combined a wooden shaft, mixed adhesives and a stone that had been chiseled to a lethal point. To many anthropologists, the creation of the stone-tipped, or hafted, spear was a watershed moment in human evolution. Not only did it amplify the killing power of early hunters, it also demonstrated clearly that they had developed the capacity for complex and abstract reasoning. Pinning down this moment in prehistory has been difficult, however.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999
Re "A Look at Neanderthals as Cannibals," Nov. 4: As a defender of lost causes, I am tired of people picking on Neanderthals. More likely than cannibalism is that they were considered fair game by Homo sapiens. GILBERT S. BAHN Moorpark
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Edwards Lifesciences Corp., the Irvine maker of artificial aortic valves, won U.S. approval to expand use of the company's Sapien device as an alternative to open-heart surgery. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the product for patients considered high risk but capable of handling surgery, the agency said Friday. Sapien, a so-called transcatheter heart valve that can be implanted with minimal incisions, was approved in November for patients considered too sick for open-heart surgery.
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1987
While William Jordan may feel some behavioral identity with a fruit fly, he has made a gross overgeneralization for the rest of Homo sapiens with "The Mystery of the Lek" (May 10). Attributing the same evolutionary forces to mate selection in flies and humans is bad science. It is even worse, however, to misapply biological principles to promote a particular ideological stance concerning social roles and behavior. Martha S. Witter UCLA Department of Biology Los Angeles
NEWS
March 16, 1986
Re the creationist/evolutionist controversy ("Creation Theory Goes to a Graduate School" by Gordon Smith, Feb. 19), I find no contradiction between the two systems. If one accepts the theory of evolution, can not one also believe that God created the first cell, that God is in the evolutionary process, and that evolution's ultimate goal is pure spirit? What does it matter whether the Earth is 6,000 or 4.5 billion years old? The real issue is whether Homo sapiens will stay around a bit longer in spite of the bomb and other environmental hazards.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990
Wilmington's review of "The Witches" leads parents to believe that this movie is appropriate for children. I think he is mistaken. I'm well into my 30s and I had trouble dealing with the graphic images and primal terrors the film presents. I read the book when I was 9 years old. It sent thrilling shivers up my spine, but a child's own imagination will conjure up images only as frightening as those to which they've been exposed. Someone else's larger-than-life conception, solidified on celluloid, influenced by the benefit of however many hardships Nicolas Roeg has endured (warts, scabs and all)
OPINION
November 14, 2004
It seems that the recent discovery of a possible new species of human, Homo floresiensis, has provided yet another opportunity for Richard Dawkins to foist his animal-rights philosophy upon us ("Just Don't Call Them Hobbits," Commentary, Nov. 9). This time, Dawkins asks us -- "us" meaning the usual suspects of morally corrupt, flesh-eating Homo sapiens -- to consider the moral implications if Homo floresiensis actually still exists somewhere in the world. Now, clap three times and imagine a world where another new species of human becomes dominant: the wide-eyed Homo idealist.
OPINION
February 13, 2005 | Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett, Rosalind C. Barnett is a senior scientist at Brandeis University and Caryl Rivers is a professor of journalism at Boston University. Their book, "Same Difference: How Gender Myths Are Hurting Our Relationships, Our Children and Our Jobs," was published in August by Basic Books.
Are women less desirable to men if they are high achievers at work? Do men prefer the "step and fetch it" subservient woman to the one with career aspirations? Two studies receiving major media attention say that the answer is yes. Not surprisingly, this "bad news for smart women" scenario fueled headlines. "They're Too Smart for These Guys," the Chicago Tribune declared. "Glass Ceilings at Altar as Well as Boardroom," the New York Times announced.
REAL ESTATE
May 20, 1990 | JOEL RAPP, Rapp is a Los Angeles free-lance writer and the gardening editor of Redbook magazine. As "Mr. Mother Earth," he has written several plant-care books.
To most gardeners, topiary is the art of shaping plants into figures of animals or geometric forms by trimming and pruning them, or by making wire frames and planting them. During the Renaissance, the art of trimming and pruning flourished in the gardens of France and Italy, and today we're all familiar with the wire-frame topiary creations at Disneyland and Disney World. But you needn't own a villa or a theme park to have a green menagerie. And you don't even have to have a back yard.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A 1.5-million-year-old skull and an equally old jaw found in Kenya are helping rewrite the history of early man, eliminating one reputed ancestor from the human lineage and suggesting that another was much more primitive than previously believed, researchers said Wednesday. Analysis of the jawbone shows that Homo habilis, once thought to be a direct ancestor of Homo erectus and thus of humans, lived side by side with H. erectus, making them sister species rather than mother and daughter.
OPINION
February 13, 2005 | Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett, Rosalind C. Barnett is a senior scientist at Brandeis University and Caryl Rivers is a professor of journalism at Boston University. Their book, "Same Difference: How Gender Myths Are Hurting Our Relationships, Our Children and Our Jobs," was published in August by Basic Books.
Are women less desirable to men if they are high achievers at work? Do men prefer the "step and fetch it" subservient woman to the one with career aspirations? Two studies receiving major media attention say that the answer is yes. Not surprisingly, this "bad news for smart women" scenario fueled headlines. "They're Too Smart for These Guys," the Chicago Tribune declared. "Glass Ceilings at Altar as Well as Boardroom," the New York Times announced.
OPINION
November 14, 2004
It seems that the recent discovery of a possible new species of human, Homo floresiensis, has provided yet another opportunity for Richard Dawkins to foist his animal-rights philosophy upon us ("Just Don't Call Them Hobbits," Commentary, Nov. 9). This time, Dawkins asks us -- "us" meaning the usual suspects of morally corrupt, flesh-eating Homo sapiens -- to consider the moral implications if Homo floresiensis actually still exists somewhere in the world. Now, clap three times and imagine a world where another new species of human becomes dominant: the wide-eyed Homo idealist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999
Re "A Look at Neanderthals as Cannibals," Nov. 4: As a defender of lost causes, I am tired of people picking on Neanderthals. More likely than cannibalism is that they were considered fair game by Homo sapiens. GILBERT S. BAHN Moorpark
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dancing in circles to a funky gospel beat, 1-year-old Rachyl Thomsen couldn't be bothered with the big wad of chewing gum stuck under her white sandal, wrapping sticky strands around her leg and ankle and making a mess of her shoe. You see, Saturday was the first time Rachyl had visited the Taste of Orange County festival, and though she could not really sample the spicy exotic food like the Louisiana jambalaya or the fish tacos, her enthusiasm was uncontrollable.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | DENIS D. GRAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minah and BJ, now happily swinging on jungle vines, were just little orphans when they narrowly escaped a lifetime of captivity. Bullet, who saw his mother gunned down, was raised by caring humans but suffered until the end of his days. Loved too little or too much, these and other brainy, sensitive orangutans have paid a heavy price for encounters with their distant cousins, Homo sapiens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1985 | Andy Rose
Charles M. (Mike) Pace has been selected to serve as mayor in the City Council's annual reorganization. Sal Sapien will take over the post of mayor pro tem. Pace, an attorney elected to a four-year council term last year, was the unanimous choice to succeed Jean Siriani as mayor. Sapien, a high school counselor, was a unanimous choice to replace outgoing Mayor Pro Tem Jim Hayes, who resigned recently after purchasing a home in Laguna Hills. Hayes' council seat was filled by Edward L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
The campaign to recall Councilman Sal Sapien is moving ahead, but organizers have not yet served recall papers on Councilman Joe V. Harris, according to Robert K. Hyun, leader of the effort. Both council members are being targeted for recall because they supported a 6% city utility tax and refused to oppose Measure A, a special June 8 ballot measure that would have allowed card clubs in the city. Eighty percent of the city's voters rejected the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Sal Sapien last week was elected mayor by his fellow council members. It is the third time in four years that he has served as mayor. "It's not going to be an easy year, with the budget the way it is," Sapien said, though he added that the community seems to be banding together to accomplish more with less. Sapien noted that the Community Safety Commission, which will hold its first meeting tonight, is a step toward a safer Stanton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Councilman Harry Dotson, bitter over his failed bid to become mayor pro tem, has decided to join the fight to recall Councilman Sal Sapien, who is the newly appointed mayor pro tem. "The man wants to be king, and he wants to run the city," Dotson said. Mayor pro tem and mayor are honorary positions on the five-member City Council and are given by a council majority vote. Mayor pro tem is the Latin term for vice mayor. The two positions are changed yearly.
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