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Sara Boutelle

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NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sara Boutelle, an architectural historian and author who rediscovered the work of Julia Morgan, the architect who designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, and brought it to wide public notice, has died. Boutelle was 90 when she died Wednesday at a hospital in Santa Cruz. Born in Aberdeen, S.D., and educated at Mt. Holyoke College, the Sorbonne and Hamburg University, Boutelle taught architecture at the Brearley School in New York City from 1946 until her retirement in 1974.
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NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sara Boutelle, an architectural historian and author who rediscovered the work of Julia Morgan, the architect who designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, and brought it to wide public notice, has died. Boutelle was 90 when she died Wednesday at a hospital in Santa Cruz. Born in Aberdeen, S.D., and educated at Mt. Holyoke College, the Sorbonne and Hamburg University, Boutelle taught architecture at the Brearley School in New York City from 1946 until her retirement in 1974.
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BOOKS
September 11, 1988 | Thomas Hines
A balanced, thoughtful, well-written, sumptuously produced, critical biography of the most significant and successful woman architect in the history of the profession.
BOOKS
September 11, 1988 | Thomas Hines
A balanced, thoughtful, well-written, sumptuously produced, critical biography of the most significant and successful woman architect in the history of the profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1990
I was delighted to note in "Only in L.A." (Metro, Dec. 22) that the decorative lobby of the defunct Herald Examiner is coming into its own as an available movie set. The building was the work of architect Julia Morgan, who was commissioned to design the sumptuous headquarters by William Randolph Hearst himself. It was her first extensive project for Hearst, resulting in a close collaboration that lasted for well over a quarter of a century and culminated in the Hearst Castle.
BOOKS
October 9, 1988
Re Thomas Hines' review of "Julia Morgan: Architect" by Sara Holmes Boutelle (Book Review, Sept. 4): While I too am a Julia Morgan fan, and pleased to see a longer overdue appreciation of her work, our enthusiasm must not overshadow the truth. Hines credits Julia Morgan with the design of Hearst's "Wyntoon," but it was designed and built (and later destroyed by fire) by Bernard Maybeck in 1902-03. Julia Morgan was 25 at the time and just returning from her European schooling. ALAN LOUIS KISHBAUGH LOS ANGELES According to Boutelle, Morgan lived in the apartment below Maybeck's in Paris in 1898.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What used to be a scenic stroll through this city's shopping district is today marred by the ruins of ornate buildings that lent this city its quaint character and landed it on the National Register of Historic Places. Each fenced-off demolition site is a tribute of sorts to a turn-of-the-century building lost to the Loma Prieta earthquake.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Sam Hall Kaplan
On display through Nov. 30 at the Pasadena Public Library is a modest photography exhibit of select buildings Julia Morgan designed for women's organizations in Southern California. While perhaps best known as the persevering architect who gave shape to the indulgent fancy of William Randolph Hearst for a castle at San Simeon on the California coast, Morgan, in a distinguished career, designed about 700 other projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She viewed women's makeup as a mask of conformity, unisex trends as rendering men and women like puppies in a litter and the modern rage for skinniness as indicative of world woes. And she kept few of those views private. She endeared herself to students, colleagues, friends and the curious public by lecturing regularly on such subjects inside and outside the classroom. Mary A.
BOOKS
December 3, 1995 | TIM STREET-PORTER, Tim Street-Porter is the author of "The Los Angeles House" (Clarkson Potter)
Books about design and architecture continue to flow from the publishing houses at a dazzling rate and are so seductively designed that, esoteric as they often are, they compete very effectively with such mainstream necessities as CD compilations and neckties as gift selections. If the graphic designers who do these books were architects, what a beautiful world we would live in. The more obscure the subject the more fabulous the cover.
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