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Sara Colm

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NEWS
February 19, 1990 | EDWARD IWATA
"7.0 earthquake shakes San Francisco Oct. 17. The regular folks got a chance to find out firsthand how the homeless feel everyday. Fractured. Separated. Stranded. Scared." --Editor Myrnalene Nabih, in the Homeless Times Every so often, mainstream journalists wander like anthropologists into poor neighborhoods to write about gangs, street people, the downtrodden.
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NEWS
February 19, 1990 | EDWARD IWATA
"7.0 earthquake shakes San Francisco Oct. 17. The regular folks got a chance to find out firsthand how the homeless feel everyday. Fractured. Separated. Stranded. Scared." --Editor Myrnalene Nabih, in the Homeless Times Every so often, mainstream journalists wander like anthropologists into poor neighborhoods to write about gangs, street people, the downtrodden.
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NEWS
March 26, 1987 | HARRIET STIX
"What is this? Is this another wedding?" Tenderloin Times co-editor Sara Colm stared down at a paragraph written in elegant--and to her, incomprehensible--Laotian script. The answer--no--was provided by Laotian reporter Chanthanom Ounkeo, and the two women moved on to the next problem, a sentence that was too long.
WORLD
November 12, 2006 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Tran Ngoc Ha crouched on a small blue plastic stool in a grove of woods a dozen miles outside the noisy bustle of the city. In his gamble to bring political change to his tightly controlled communist homeland, he knew it was the only place safe enough to talk freely. To shake the ever-present government agents, the underground newspaper publisher had insisted that a Western reporter travel four hours on a circuitous route -- beginning at 4 a.m.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
It is a spare, tiny room, with a crucifix in one corner and a pile of dirty clothes in the other. At times, Susan Shiffrin can hear annoying, boisterous laughter down the hall. But for now it is home, something the 43-year-old woman has rarely known. "They can say I'm crazy, but you really don't remember anything after electro-shock treatment," she said with agitation, rocking back and forth on the edge of her bed. "Sometimes I can't focus. Is that a crime? I didn't ask to live on the streets."
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