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Sara Davidson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When author and journalist Sara Davidson returned to the West Coast from the east in the mid-'70s, friends warned her that she would be writing a screenplay within a year. In fact, it took two. Davidson, who has been co-producer of the CBS-TV hit "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman," will be the featured speaker of the Ventura County Writers Club in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
WHY is it that so many authors with recent books about middle-age life (Arianna Huffington, whose subject is women and courage; Deirdre Bair, divorce; and Caitlin Flanagan, parenting), think that their experience is useful for the rest of us? Sara Davidson, in her book "Leap! What Will We Do With the Rest of Our Lives?" sets out to ask questions that she feels are universal to women of a certain age: How does a high-powered person learn to climb down the ladder gracefully?
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NEWS
March 21, 1999
Most every girl has a cowboy fantasy. Author Sara Davidson made hers come true. But the reality is a little more complicated than the fantasy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000 | ANN SHIELDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When author and journalist Sara Davidson returned to the West Coast from the east in the mid-'70s, friends warned her that she would be writing a screenplay within a year. In fact, it took two. Davidson, who has been co-producer of the CBS-TV hit "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman," will be the featured speaker of the Ventura County Writers Club in Thousand Oaks on Tuesday.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the morning before the book tour began, a morning so pristine and blue that from the hills above the beach in Malibu, even the horses seemed to be taking in the view, the author sat in a rusted patio chair with her back to the sun trying to define yet again the nature of the attraction. Lust? No, not exactly. Soul mate? Well, perhaps. . . .
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | DAVID FREEMAN, Freeman is a screenwriter and the author of "A Hollywood Education" (Putnam's), published last month. and
Rock Hudson: His Story by Rock Hudson and Sara Davidson (Morrow: $16.95) Idol: Rock Hudson, the True Story of an American Film Hero by Jerry Oppenheimer and Jack Vitek (Villard: $16.95) Rock Hudson always seemed the least mysterious of movie stars. The shy, small-town boy who became a Hollywood god, appeared emotionally accessible and uncomplicated, a man's man, which is to say, a ladies' man.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1988 | NANCY MILLS
Some years ago, novelist Sara Davidson had an unpleasant experience with a male gynecologist. "I had a problem," she recalls, "and he said, 'I'll give you some magic pills and that will solve the problem. Don't worry, it's not one of those funny things.' " 'You mean it's not cancer?' I asked. I didn't like being talked to as a 3-year-old." Davidson, the author of "Loose Change," "Friends of the Opposite Sex" and "Rock Hudson: His Story," eventually discovered the Santa Monica Women's Clinic.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"DESPERATELY SEEKING buckaroo with slow hand, easy touch. Must be tall, taciturn, look good in chaps. Me: DJF, 49, two kids, professional writer ('Loose Change,' a bestselling account of '60s counterculture life; scripts for the TV drama 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman'), tired of the L.A. Weekly classified dating scene (producers with Porsches don't do it for me anymore), in need of a good man to make me feel at home on the range.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
WHY is it that so many authors with recent books about middle-age life (Arianna Huffington, whose subject is women and courage; Deirdre Bair, divorce; and Caitlin Flanagan, parenting), think that their experience is useful for the rest of us? Sara Davidson, in her book "Leap! What Will We Do With the Rest of Our Lives?" sets out to ask questions that she feels are universal to women of a certain age: How does a high-powered person learn to climb down the ladder gracefully?
MAGAZINE
July 12, 1992
I'm touched by Jerry Brown's principles and the fact that he has the guts to act on them ("Travels With Jerry," by Sara Davidson, May 31). What other politican would spend the night on a sofa bed in South Los Angeles when he could go to a luxury hotel? What's unique about Jerry is that he doesn't appear to want anything in winning an election except an opportunity to improve the lives of people, people the wealthy aren't even interested in. He must be a good human being, because no one could be such a good liar.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the morning before the book tour began, a morning so pristine and blue that from the hills above the beach in Malibu, even the horses seemed to be taking in the view, the author sat in a rusted patio chair with her back to the sun trying to define yet again the nature of the attraction. Lust? No, not exactly. Soul mate? Well, perhaps. . . .
NEWS
March 21, 1999
Most every girl has a cowboy fantasy. Author Sara Davidson made hers come true. But the reality is a little more complicated than the fantasy.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"DESPERATELY SEEKING buckaroo with slow hand, easy touch. Must be tall, taciturn, look good in chaps. Me: DJF, 49, two kids, professional writer ('Loose Change,' a bestselling account of '60s counterculture life; scripts for the TV drama 'Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman'), tired of the L.A. Weekly classified dating scene (producers with Porsches don't do it for me anymore), in need of a good man to make me feel at home on the range.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1988 | NANCY MILLS
Some years ago, novelist Sara Davidson had an unpleasant experience with a male gynecologist. "I had a problem," she recalls, "and he said, 'I'll give you some magic pills and that will solve the problem. Don't worry, it's not one of those funny things.' " 'You mean it's not cancer?' I asked. I didn't like being talked to as a 3-year-old." Davidson, the author of "Loose Change," "Friends of the Opposite Sex" and "Rock Hudson: His Story," eventually discovered the Santa Monica Women's Clinic.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | DAVID FREEMAN, Freeman is a screenwriter and the author of "A Hollywood Education" (Putnam's), published last month. and
Rock Hudson: His Story by Rock Hudson and Sara Davidson (Morrow: $16.95) Idol: Rock Hudson, the True Story of an American Film Hero by Jerry Oppenheimer and Jack Vitek (Villard: $16.95) Rock Hudson always seemed the least mysterious of movie stars. The shy, small-town boy who became a Hollywood god, appeared emotionally accessible and uncomplicated, a man's man, which is to say, a ladies' man.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Sara Davidson, creator of ABC's medical series "HeartBeat," has been removed from her role as co-producer but will remain on the staff next season as a creative consultant, The Times has learned. Davidson said that her recent removal as a co-producer by Aaron Spelling Productions came as a surprise, adding that she "wasn't given any explanation" for it. Ilene Chaiken, vice president of creative affairs for Aaron Spelling Productions, declined to explain the change.
NEWS
September 9, 1985 | United Press International
Rock Hudson is writing a book about his life--including his battle with AIDS--and proceeds of the autobiography will go toward fighting the killer disease, his publisher, William Morrow and Co., said today. A Morrow spokeswoman said the autobiography will be called "My Story." Hudson will dictate his story from his bedside to writer Sara Davidson, the spokeswoman said. There was no word when the book would be published.
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