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Sara Fritz

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February 10, 1989
Sara Fritz, The Times' congressional correspondent, Wednesday was named the winner of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for the best reporting on Congress during 1988. Fritz won the $5,000 award, bestowed by the Dirksen Congressional Center, for a series of four articles titled "What's Wrong with Congress," that ran from Jan. 24 to Jan. 27, 1988. Fritz has worked in the Times Washington Bureau since 1983. The Dirksen Congressional Center, based in Pekin, Ill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Sara Fritz, an award-winning journalist who covered politics on Capitol Hill for more than three decades, including 14 years at the Los Angeles Times, died Wednesday in Washington, D.C. She was 68. Fritz developed a lung infection after successful hip surgery and was hospitalized for more than month, said her husband, James A. Kidney. She was removed from life support at George Washington University Hospital after her family and doctors agreed she would not recover from the debilitating infection.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Sara Fritz, an award-winning journalist who covered politics on Capitol Hill for more than three decades, including 14 years at the Los Angeles Times, died Wednesday in Washington, D.C. She was 68. Fritz developed a lung infection after successful hip surgery and was hospitalized for more than month, said her husband, James A. Kidney. She was removed from life support at George Washington University Hospital after her family and doctors agreed she would not recover from the debilitating infection.
NEWS
February 10, 1989
Sara Fritz, The Times' congressional correspondent, Wednesday was named the winner of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for the best reporting on Congress during 1988. Fritz won the $5,000 award, bestowed by the Dirksen Congressional Center, for a series of four articles titled "What's Wrong with Congress," that ran from Jan. 24 to Jan. 27, 1988. Fritz has worked in the Times Washington Bureau since 1983. The Dirksen Congressional Center, based in Pekin, Ill.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994
I recently have received a copy of a Nov. 23 article on the Kennedy assassination by Sara Fritz. In that article she quotes me as counsel to the Warren Commission, saying: "David W. Belin, a former staff attorney who has been the most outspoken among the defenders of the Warren Commission, says the (medical) panel's 'biggest mistake was to yield to the desires of the Kennedy family that the autopsy photos be kept out of the public domain.' " That quotation was part of an overall interview in which the primary focus was that, beyond a reasonable doubt, Oswald was the lone gunman who killed Kennedy, wounded Gov. John Connally and killed Officer J. D. Tippit; all of the shots came from the rear, as confirmed by four separate medical panels as well as by the ballistic evidence; and the main reason so many people do not believe the Warren Commission is that electronic media have never given the truth an equal opportunity to be heard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991
Sara Fritz writes, "If they oppose Thomas, analysts say, liberals may open themselves to the charge that they are discriminating against a minority nominee simply because his views are not in line with their own" ("Nomination of Thomas Seen as Deft Political Stroke," July 3). This is a shocking possibility, if the analysts are correct. With all the good reasons for opposing or supporting people, such as race, nationality, party or religious affiliation, economic status, sexual orientation, generosity or its lack, addictions, etc., now are we to oppose or support people simply because of their views?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1993
In Sara Fritz's article on health care reform (Sept. 6) she refers to "a Canadian-style system of socialized medicine." In point of fact, Canada does not have socialized medicine. What they have is a national health insurance plan. Canada has more doctors working on a fee-for-service basis than the U.S. does, proportionately. While it is true that physician fees in Canada are constrained by limits negotiated between physician groups and the government, this hardly constitutes socialized medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1988
Sara Fritz's excellent and revealing article (Part I, Dec. 19) on the perks of being in Congress illustrates so well the poor example set by our representatives in Washington and their utter disregard for our sensibilities regarding their pay. In addition to all these startling revelations dug out by Fritz, I need to point out that increasing congressional salaries by 50% to adjust for inflation is unjustified. Even if Congress did not directly cause the inflation, they certainly permitted it and promoted policies that encouraged it. They don't deserve rewards for that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1996
The Los Angeles Times took 21 first-place plaques Saturday at the Greater Los Angeles Press Club Southern California Journalism Awards, more than any other news organization. The Times also won the overall Award of Excellence in 1994 and 1995 at the event at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Warren Olney, who hosts the "Which Way L.A.?" radio show on KCRW-FM, won the Joseph M. Quinn Memorial Award. Times winners included: Sara Fritz, David Willman, Alan Miller and Dwight Morris, all of the Washington, D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1989
Sara Fritz's report about congressional speaking fees and charitable foundations ("Speech Fees: Handy Tool for Congress," Part I, Jan. 16) was a sad disservice to your readers and to disabled Americans. As president and chief executive officer of the Dole Foundation--one of The Times targets--I want an opportunity to set the record straight. The Times claims that the Dole Foundation is "perhaps the most elaborate outgrowth of excess honorariums." This statement is preposterous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991
I was disappointed to read in Sara Fritz's article ("Firms Use Jets When They Court Official Washington," front page, July 1) that Rep. Vic Fazio (D-Sacramento) is among those government officials who frequently fly on corporate aircraft--a practice that is inherently corrupting. This is the same congressman who has intoned against the evils of honorariums and who courageously voted for an ethics investigation of then-Speaker Jim Wright. As an emerging congressional leader with a reputation for integrity and sensitivity to ethical issues, Fazio is also one of the key legislators on whom political reform advocates have staked their hopes that Congress will finally move this year to clean up the campaign finance system.
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