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Sara Paretsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
Body Work A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky Putnam: 444 pp., $26.95
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
Breakdown A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky G.P. Putnam's Sons: 431 pp., $26.95
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MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | SUSAN FERRARO, California native Susan Ferraro is a New York-based writer who is an avid mystery reader.
IT IS THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING, an unseasonably warm afternoon in Chicago, and Sara Paretsky is almost happy. Almost. The best-selling author of the V. I. Warshawski murder mysteries, Paretsky has recovered from the exhausting, maddening publicity that preceded the summer premiere--and box-office bomb--of "V.I. Warshawski," starring Kathleen Turner. Now it is comeback time: Paretsky's new novel, "Guardian Angel," will hit the bookstores in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
Body Work A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky Putnam: 444 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012
Breakdown A V.I. Warshawski Novel Sara Paretsky G.P. Putnam's Sons: 431 pp., $26.95
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Sarah Weinman
TWENTY-five years ago, an assertive, take-no-prisoners private investigator working the mean streets of Chicago arrived on the mystery scene, leading critics and readers to herald her creator as the newest heir to Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. A seemingly common designation turned out to be groundbreaking because both Sara Paretsky and her creation, V.I.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | WENDY LEOPOLD
I don't have such grand ideals as a detective. Not only do I not think I can save the world, I suspect most people are past redemption. I'm just the garbage collector, cleaning up little trash piles here and there. --V. I. Warshawski in "Bitter Medicine" by Sara Paretsky For the better part of the 20th Century the professional private investigator in American fiction was in the male domain. The writers were men and their tough, case-hardened protagonists were, too.
BOOKS
September 16, 2001 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review
It's a few days before Christmas, five lions are chewing on a naked woman in the city zoo, and TV reporters are having a field day. The zoo lies half in the 87th precinct and half in the 88th. So officers Carella and Meyer of the 87th and Ollie Weeks of the 88th catch the squeal, and we are entrapped by the spell of Ed McBain in the guise of the Magical Mr. Mistoffelees. Redheads are ice-picked to death and fed to the lions.
BOOKS
July 31, 2005 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The age of prequels is upon us. In film, fashion and publishing, revivals rule and, often, mimicry. When talent flags, bring on the remnants and the remakes. That's not the case with the reissue of Charles McCarry's "The Tears of Autumn," a wonderful web of espionage first spun in 1975, close enough to President Kennedy's assassination, on which the plot turns, to have reverberated in readers' memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Warshawsky' Writer to TV: Fans of "V.I. Warshawsky" novelist Sara Paretsky may soon be able to see the author's work on television. She has signed to write the debut series for "Sisters in Crime," a slate of mystery miniseries being developed for Lifetime TV. The series, produced by Meryl Marshall and Mae Woods in collaboration with Sisters in Crime, a national organization founded by Paretsky, will showcase original works by women mystery writers.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Sarah Weinman
TWENTY-five years ago, an assertive, take-no-prisoners private investigator working the mean streets of Chicago arrived on the mystery scene, leading critics and readers to herald her creator as the newest heir to Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. A seemingly common designation turned out to be groundbreaking because both Sara Paretsky and her creation, V.I.
BOOKS
July 31, 2005 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The age of prequels is upon us. In film, fashion and publishing, revivals rule and, often, mimicry. When talent flags, bring on the remnants and the remakes. That's not the case with the reissue of Charles McCarry's "The Tears of Autumn," a wonderful web of espionage first spun in 1975, close enough to President Kennedy's assassination, on which the plot turns, to have reverberated in readers' memories.
BOOKS
September 16, 2001 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review
It's a few days before Christmas, five lions are chewing on a naked woman in the city zoo, and TV reporters are having a field day. The zoo lies half in the 87th precinct and half in the 88th. So officers Carella and Meyer of the 87th and Ollie Weeks of the 88th catch the squeal, and we are entrapped by the spell of Ed McBain in the guise of the Magical Mr. Mistoffelees. Redheads are ice-picked to death and fed to the lions.
MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | SUSAN FERRARO, California native Susan Ferraro is a New York-based writer who is an avid mystery reader.
IT IS THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING, an unseasonably warm afternoon in Chicago, and Sara Paretsky is almost happy. Almost. The best-selling author of the V. I. Warshawski murder mysteries, Paretsky has recovered from the exhausting, maddening publicity that preceded the summer premiere--and box-office bomb--of "V.I. Warshawski," starring Kathleen Turner. Now it is comeback time: Paretsky's new novel, "Guardian Angel," will hit the bookstores in January.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | WENDY LEOPOLD
I don't have such grand ideals as a detective. Not only do I not think I can save the world, I suspect most people are past redemption. I'm just the garbage collector, cleaning up little trash piles here and there. --V. I. Warshawski in "Bitter Medicine" by Sara Paretsky For the better part of the 20th Century the professional private investigator in American fiction was in the male domain. The writers were men and their tough, case-hardened protagonists were, too.
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