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Sara Scribner

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1996
A New York band with a subtle, seductive, "quiet alternative" sound, Elysian Fields is Jennifer Charles--a provocative crooner who intones like a cross between Mazzy Star low-key blueswoman Hope Sandoval and Congo Norvell torch queen Sally Norvell. She is fire and ice, seductress and cool poet. At the Largo on Wednesday, Charles and her band played a hushed, understated set that rode on Charles' knack for holding a room in thrall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997
In its infancy, the Los Angeles band That Dog was all about stamping out pop conventions, a goal that limited its audience to an iconoclastic few. From the opening chords of its show at the Roxy on Wednesday, however, the band embraced the "fa-la-la" vocals and muscular yet catchy pop of its new album, "Retreat From the Sun," delivering it to a new, far bigger crowd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997
In its infancy, the Los Angeles band That Dog was all about stamping out pop conventions, a goal that limited its audience to an iconoclastic few. From the opening chords of its show at the Roxy on Wednesday, however, the band embraced the "fa-la-la" vocals and muscular yet catchy pop of its new album, "Retreat From the Sun," delivering it to a new, far bigger crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1996
A New York band with a subtle, seductive, "quiet alternative" sound, Elysian Fields is Jennifer Charles--a provocative crooner who intones like a cross between Mazzy Star low-key blueswoman Hope Sandoval and Congo Norvell torch queen Sally Norvell. She is fire and ice, seductress and cool poet. At the Largo on Wednesday, Charles and her band played a hushed, understated set that rode on Charles' knack for holding a room in thrall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996
Lush's first album, released in 1990 I believe, was "Gala" ("Refiguring the Lush Life," by Lorraine Ali, May 12). "Spooky," released in 1992, was their second album, "Split" their third and "Lovelife" their fourth. I'm always happy to see coverage on one of my favorite bands, but it's even better when the news is accurate. DIANNE HENDERSON Upland Sara Scribner's sarcastic quip about "All This Useless Beauty" being Elvis Costello's 340th album suggests that she has contempt for any artist this prolific (Record Rack, May 12)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997
Over the years I have been conditioned to tolerate Depeche Mode reviews written by journalists who, from the outside looking in, do not understand the relationship between the band and its followers. Therefore, I did not expect Sara Scribner's review of the recent Shrine concert to provide any information of interest to true fans of the band ("Depeche Mode Still Has Some Demons to Dispatch," May 19). But is it too much to ask for the reviewer to at least know the names of the songs she is reviewing?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1996
After reading Sara Scribner's review of "Quattro Formaggi," [the debut album by Keanu Reeves' band, Dogstar] I must admit I am puzzled why the L.A. Times would print an album review that features not one word about the music actually contained on the CD ("Derivative Grunge-Blues on 'Quattro Formaggi' " Aug. 22). Nowhere is there a critique or comparison of a single song, lyric or music and, therefore, nothing substantiated her rating. I'm not defending the music. If she didn't care for it, that's fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998
Is it possible for anyone writing about Save Ferris to avoid making a "clever" joke with the words "no doubt" in reference to them? Apparently not, as the article by Sara Scribner ("Save Ferris Highlights Pros and Cons of Ska," Dec. 29) proves. Its opening sentence immediately informed me that the rest of the article would be just as unimaginative and insulting to the reader and the band. All too often, lazy journalists take cheap shots at a band, in this case comparing Monique Powell to Gwen Stefani [of No Doubt]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1996 | Richard Cromelin
Beck is resoundingly where it's at, according to the 21 Times pop music contributors who submitted their lists of the year's best albums. The folkie/hip-hop alchemist's "Odelay" swamped the competition in the 16th annual balloting by an even wider margin than that of last year's winner, PJ Harvey, establishing a new record for margin of victory.
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
"To speak from a particular place and time is not provincialism but part of a writer's identity," insists poet Dana Gioia, who proudly claims the mean streets of Hawthorne as his birthplace. "It is my pleasure and my challenge to speak from California." Gioia's words offer a rare moment of unembarrassed affirmation in "The Misread City," an illuminating but also intentionally provocative anthology edited by Gioia and Scott Timberg.
OPINION
March 21, 2010 | By Sara Scribner
The current generation of kindergartners to 12th graders -- those born between 1991 and 2004 -- has no memory of a time before Google. But although these students are far more tech savvy than their parents and are perpetually connected to the Internet, they know a lot less than they think. And worse, they don't know what they don't know. As a librarian in the Pasadena Unified School District, I teach students research skills. But I've just been pink-slipped, along with five other middle school and high school librarians, and only a parcel tax on the city's May ballot can save the district's libraries.
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