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Sara Tokars

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NEWS
March 1, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a contract hit, the killing of Sara Tokars could hardly have been more bungled. The first time the killers came calling, sneaking into the house through an unlocked sliding glass door, a barking spaniel sent them scurrying. Scrambling back out into the night, the intruders glimpsed a light flick on somewhere in the house--somebody was getting up. The second time the killers came calling, nobody was home.
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NEWS
March 5, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a "wolf in sheep's clothing," a mild-mannered lawyer and part-time judge whose veneer of respectability hid a sordid underworld existence involving drugs, money laundering, torture and murder. That's how federal prosecutors Friday described Fredric W. Tokars, once an up-and-coming member of Atlanta's legal and political community who is now on trial on racketeering charges. Among the crimes he is accused of committing is the 1992 murder of his wife.
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NEWS
March 5, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a "wolf in sheep's clothing," a mild-mannered lawyer and part-time judge whose veneer of respectability hid a sordid underworld existence involving drugs, money laundering, torture and murder. That's how federal prosecutors Friday described Fredric W. Tokars, once an up-and-coming member of Atlanta's legal and political community who is now on trial on racketeering charges. Among the crimes he is accused of committing is the 1992 murder of his wife.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a contract hit, the killing of Sara Tokars could hardly have been more bungled. The first time the killers came calling, sneaking into the house through an unlocked sliding glass door, a barking spaniel sent them scurrying. Scrambling back out into the night, the intruders glimpsed a light flick on somewhere in the house--somebody was getting up. The second time the killers came calling, nobody was home.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine months after the brutal slaying of Sara Tokars, her husband, a well-known Atlanta attorney, was charged Thursday with homicide, accused of arranging the murder of his wife to protect a wide-ranging criminal enterprise that included drug trafficking, money laundering and counterfeiting. Fredric W. Tokars was being held in Palm Beach County Jail after his arrest Wednesday night outside his mother's West Palm Beach condominium.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring allegations that greed and Hollywood overzealousness had corrupted the legal process, a federal jury Friday convicted an Atlanta attorney of racketeering in connection with drug charges and the murder of his wife. Fredric W. Tokars, a former Fulton County prosecutor and part-time municipal judge, was found guilty on eight counts, including racketeering, money laundering, kidnaping and using a telephone to arrange a murder. Four of the counts carried mandatory life sentences.
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