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Sarafina Movie

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September 13, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
The world has changed radically in the five years since the South African musical "Sarafina!" first hit the Broadway stage. The Soviet Union has collapsed. The Berlin Wall is gone. And, in the wake of the release of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, the Parliament of South Africa abolished the laws mandating separation of the races. As history has evolved, so did the film version of "Sarafina!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Any fears of white backlash were erased when "Sarafina!," a hard-hitting musical targeting South Africa's apartheid policy, opened in that country earlier this month. The reviews were excellent (one critic called the film "an achievement that should, at last, put South African cinema on the international map"). The film, which stars Leleti Khumalo and Whoopi Goldberg, did business even in relatively right-wing white areas such as Pretoria and Bloemfontein.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contrast and complexity of South Africa firmly hit home for Whoopi Goldberg after one particularly long day in Soweto, the hometown of 2 million blacks where she was shooting scenes for the film "Sarafina!" Goldberg was whisked from the township of chickens and dust and squatter shacks to a $10-million house just 20 minutes away, where she was feted at a reception by African National Congress President Nelson Mandela.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sarafina!," the new musical film starring Whoopi Goldberg, had its South African premiere Tuesday, and drew strong applause from an invited audience of anti-apartheid luminaries including African National Congress President Nelson Mandela. In an emotional tribute to the movie, Mandela told the audience that "Sarafina!," a fictional film based on the June 16, 1976, student uprising in Soweto, is not only a reminder of the past but a challenge for the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sarafina!," the new musical film starring Whoopi Goldberg, had its South African premiere Tuesday, and drew strong applause from an invited audience of anti-apartheid luminaries including African National Congress President Nelson Mandela. In an emotional tribute to the movie, Mandela told the audience that "Sarafina!," a fictional film based on the June 16, 1976, student uprising in Soweto, is not only a reminder of the past but a challenge for the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Any fears of white backlash were erased when "Sarafina!," a hard-hitting musical targeting South Africa's apartheid policy, opened in that country earlier this month. The reviews were excellent (one critic called the film "an achievement that should, at last, put South African cinema on the international map"). The film, which stars Leleti Khumalo and Whoopi Goldberg, did business even in relatively right-wing white areas such as Pretoria and Bloemfontein.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most heartening qualities of art is the way it regularly blossoms out in seemingly incongruous places. From the gardens of the wealthy, we may see only pale malaise, while just across town, in the slums, something in the darkness, blood and impoverishment may fertilize a rose. Or a hundred of them. The South African musical "Sarafina!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most heartening qualities of art is the way it regularly blossoms out in seemingly incongruous places. From the gardens of the wealthy, we may see only pale malaise, while just across town, in the slums, something in the darkness, blood and impoverishment may fertilize a rose. Or a hundred of them. The South African musical "Sarafina!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
The world has changed radically in the five years since the South African musical "Sarafina!" first hit the Broadway stage. The Soviet Union has collapsed. The Berlin Wall is gone. And, in the wake of the release of jailed African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, the Parliament of South Africa abolished the laws mandating separation of the races. As history has evolved, so did the film version of "Sarafina!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contrast and complexity of South Africa firmly hit home for Whoopi Goldberg after one particularly long day in Soweto, the hometown of 2 million blacks where she was shooting scenes for the film "Sarafina!" Goldberg was whisked from the township of chickens and dust and squatter shacks to a $10-million house just 20 minutes away, where she was feted at a reception by African National Congress President Nelson Mandela.
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