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December 16, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sarafina!," "Miss Dessa" and "Two Trains Running" were the big winners in the Beverly Hills/Hollywood NAACP's fifth annual theater awards, announced Monday in a ceremony at the Westwood Playhouse. "Sarafina!," part of the CTG/ Ahmanson season at the Doolittle Theatre, was honored nine times in the Equity musicals category, while "Miss Dessa" at the Crossroads Theatre took eight awards in the smaller theaters (99-Seat Plan) category.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sarafina!," "Miss Dessa" and "Two Trains Running" were the big winners in the Beverly Hills/Hollywood NAACP's fifth annual theater awards, announced Monday in a ceremony at the Westwood Playhouse. "Sarafina!," part of the CTG/ Ahmanson season at the Doolittle Theatre, was honored nine times in the Equity musicals category, while "Miss Dessa" at the Crossroads Theatre took eight awards in the smaller theaters (99-Seat Plan) category.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South African playwright Mbongeni Ngema conceived "Sarafina!" in 1984, Nelson Mandela, new president of the anti-apartheid African National Congress, was serving a life prison sentence. By the time "Sarafina!" opened July 18 at the James A. Doolittle Theater in Hollywood, Mandela had been out of prison for more than a year. And, just a month before opening night, South African President Frederik W.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Any fears of white backlash were erased when "Sarafina!," a hard-hitting musical targeting South Africa's apartheid policy, opened in that country earlier this month. The reviews were excellent (one critic called the film "an achievement that should, at last, put South African cinema on the international map"). The film, which stars Leleti Khumalo and Whoopi Goldberg, did business even in relatively right-wing white areas such as Pretoria and Bloemfontein.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA
Any fears of white backlash were erased when "Sarafina!," a hard-hitting musical targeting South Africa's apartheid policy, opened in that country earlier this month. The reviews were excellent (one critic called the film "an achievement that should, at last, put South African cinema on the international map"). The film, which stars Leleti Khumalo and Whoopi Goldberg, did business even in relatively right-wing white areas such as Pretoria and Bloemfontein.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Sarafina!' Set: "Let nobody think that people won't come downtown for live theater," declared Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, joining in the official announcement on Thursday that a touring production of the South African musical "Sarafina!" will play the Orpheum, a 2,200-seat vintage (1926) downtown movie palace, for at least three weeks beginning Jan. 30. The show will be the first extended run at the Orpheum since "No Strings" in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South African playwright Mbongeni Ngema conceived "Sarafina!" in 1984, Nelson Mandela, new president of the anti-apartheid African National Congress, was serving a life prison sentence. By the time "Sarafina!" opened July 18 at the James A. Doolittle Theater in Hollywood, Mandela had been out of prison for more than a year. And, just a month before opening night, South African President Frederik W.
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