Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSarah Bloom Raskin
IN THE NEWS

Sarah Bloom Raskin

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- President Obama on Wednesday nominated Federal Reserve Gov. Sarah Bloom Raskin to be deputy Treasury secretary. If confirmed by the Senate, Raskin would be the first woman to serve in the department's No. 2 position. Her move also would open a second vacancy on the Fed's Board of Governors. Elizabeth Duke said recently she would step down from the seven-member board in August. Raskin would replace Deputy Secretary Neal Wolin, who recently announced he would step down at the end of August after serving since 2009.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama will nominate Stanley Fischer, the former head of the Bank of Israel, to be vice chair of the Federal Reserve, and also tapped two others for seats on the central bank's Board of Governors, the White House said. Lael Brainard, who stepped down in November as Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, was chosen to fill one of the vacant seats on the seven-member Fed board. Jerome H. Powell, a former Treasury official and investment banker who has served on the Fed board since 2012, will be renominated.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 28, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
  President Obama nominated a former Treasury official from the George H.W. Bush administration and a Harvard economist to fill two vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. The nominees, Jerome H. (Jay) Powell and Jeremy C. Stein, would serve 14-year terms on the board if they are confirmed by the Senate. "I am grateful that these individuals have agreed to serve their nation at this important time for our economy," Obama said Tuesday. "Their distinguished backgrounds and experience coupled with their impressive knowledge of economic and monetary policy make them tremendously qualified to serve in these important roles.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Now that the Federal Reserve has started to ease a key economic stimulus, the reins of managing monetary policy to finish the job soon will be turned over to Janet L. Yellen, the central bank's vice chair. She won't find it easy. Yellen, expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Saturday as the Fed's first female chief, will be leading a very different and potentially more fractious policymaking team at the central bank. A more divisive group could be particularly nettlesome as she tries to execute the complicated exit from the Fed's unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy after the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Lael Brainard, the Treasury department's top official in dealing with global financial issues, will step down this week amid speculation she could be nominated to the Federal Reserve Board. Brainard has served as undersecretary for international affairs since 2010, helping lead U.S. efforts to deal with the European debt crisis and an increasingly complex economic relationship with China. She is one of the department's highest-ranking women. Friday will be her last day, a Treasury official said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama will nominate Stanley Fischer, the former head of the Bank of Israel, to be vice chair of the Federal Reserve, and also tapped two others for seats on the central bank's Board of Governors, the White House said. Lael Brainard, who stepped down in November as Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, was chosen to fill one of the vacant seats on the seven-member Fed board. Jerome H. Powell, a former Treasury official and investment banker who has served on the Fed board since 2012, will be renominated.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Sandra Pianalto, will step down early next year, creating another vacancy among central bank policymakers as they grapple with reducing their stimulus efforts. The head of the Cleveland Fed is set to take one of four rotating positions as a voting member on the 12-person Federal Open Market Committee, which makes monetary policy decisions. Pianalto, who has led the Cleveland Fed since 2003, said Thursday she would retire early next year.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Proposed limits on the hidden fees behind most debit card purchases ? caps designed to bring down prices for consumers ? could be changed or delayed after an outcry from the financial industry and lawmakers. Every time a debit card is swiped, the merchant pays the bank an average of 44 cents to process the transaction. The Federal Reserve, saying the actual cost was drastically lower, proposed in December to cut the fee that large banks charge to 12 cents per transaction. The Fed's proposal has sparked a major battle between bankers and retailers.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee
WASHINGTON - Now that the Federal Reserve has started to ease a key economic stimulus, the reins of managing monetary policy to finish the job soon will be turned over to Janet L. Yellen, the central bank's vice chair. She won't find it easy. Yellen, expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Saturday as the Fed's first female chief, will be leading a very different and potentially more fractious policymaking team at the central bank. A more divisive group could be particularly nettlesome as she tries to execute the complicated exit from the Fed's unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy after the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2010 | By Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
President Obama plans to name Janet Yellen to serve as vice chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, where she would play a crucial role in shaping monetary policy for the nation's banking system. Yellen, 63, is a former member of the Fed's Board of Governors and has served as president and chief executive of the 12th District Federal Reserve Bank in San Francisco since 2004. She will be appointed Thursday, according to a source who requested anonymity in order to speak about the candidates in advance of the official announcement.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Lael Brainard, the Treasury department's top official in dealing with global financial issues, will step down this week amid speculation she could be nominated to the Federal Reserve Board. Brainard has served as undersecretary for international affairs since 2010, helping lead U.S. efforts to deal with the European debt crisis and an increasingly complex economic relationship with China. She is one of the department's highest-ranking women. Friday will be her last day, a Treasury official said.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Sandra Pianalto, will step down early next year, creating another vacancy among central bank policymakers as they grapple with reducing their stimulus efforts. The head of the Cleveland Fed is set to take one of four rotating positions as a voting member on the 12-person Federal Open Market Committee, which makes monetary policy decisions. Pianalto, who has led the Cleveland Fed since 2003, said Thursday she would retire early next year.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- President Obama on Wednesday nominated Federal Reserve Gov. Sarah Bloom Raskin to be deputy Treasury secretary. If confirmed by the Senate, Raskin would be the first woman to serve in the department's No. 2 position. Her move also would open a second vacancy on the Fed's Board of Governors. Elizabeth Duke said recently she would step down from the seven-member board in August. Raskin would replace Deputy Secretary Neal Wolin, who recently announced he would step down at the end of August after serving since 2009.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
  President Obama nominated a former Treasury official from the George H.W. Bush administration and a Harvard economist to fill two vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. The nominees, Jerome H. (Jay) Powell and Jeremy C. Stein, would serve 14-year terms on the board if they are confirmed by the Senate. "I am grateful that these individuals have agreed to serve their nation at this important time for our economy," Obama said Tuesday. "Their distinguished backgrounds and experience coupled with their impressive knowledge of economic and monetary policy make them tremendously qualified to serve in these important roles.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Proposed limits on the hidden fees behind most debit card purchases ? caps designed to bring down prices for consumers ? could be changed or delayed after an outcry from the financial industry and lawmakers. Every time a debit card is swiped, the merchant pays the bank an average of 44 cents to process the transaction. The Federal Reserve, saying the actual cost was drastically lower, proposed in December to cut the fee that large banks charge to 12 cents per transaction. The Fed's proposal has sparked a major battle between bankers and retailers.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2013 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - President Obama praised Lawrence H. Summers and Janet L. Yellen as "highly qualified" to be the next Federal Reserve chief, but said he had a "range of outstanding candidates" and reiterated that he would not make a decision until the fall. In a news conference Friday, Obama also suggested that his recent defense of Summers, a former Treasury secretary and his onetime chief economic advisor, should not be construed as Summers somehow having an inside track on the job. Yellen is the Fed's current vice chair.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
The decision by Nobel Prize-winning economist Peter Diamond to withdraw his long-stalled nomination to the Federal Reserve Board deepens the bitter rift between President Obama and Senate Republicans over key presidential appointments, a chasm that could make future candidates unwilling to leap into the volatile confirmation process. The result could be more top government officials serving in acting roles that weaken their power because they're viewed as placeholders. And it could force Obama and future presidents to make greater use of short-term recess appointments, which bypass the Senate confirmation process but leave the officeholder with a much shorter term.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|