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Sarah Chalke

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NEWS
January 15, 1995 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Chalke may have been a teen-ager from Canada who hadn't yet acted in the United States, but she wasn't a bit daunted when asked to take over a long-established role on ABC's highly rated "Roseanne" last year. In fact, she's settled comfortably into the role and don't be surprised if you overhear some people remark: "Someone else played Becky?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
ABC is clearly seeing red, axing two more shows: “Red Widow” and “How to Live With Your Parents for the Rest of Your Life.”  Based on the Dutch format, “Red Widow” had a lackluster midseason launch, averaging a 1.1 rating in the 18-49 demographic and 5 million viewers. The series starred Rahda Mitchell as a stay-at-home mom who finds herself embroiled in familial ties with the Russian mob. The thriller completed its eight-episode run Sunday. Breath-catcher “How to Live With Your Parents for the Rest of Your Life” also won't return for another season.
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NEWS
April 29, 2004 | Chris Barton
After first coming on the scene as a replacement for oldest daughter Becky Conner on TV's "Roseanne" in the early '90s, Sarah Chalke has come into her own as the clumsy, quick-witted Dr. Elliot Reid on NBC's warped medical comedy "Scrubs." When not visiting her native Canada, Chalke enjoys some of the many benefits of living in Los Angeles: namely, hiking, hunting for antiques and ultimately feeling free to soak up our beautiful sunny skies -- or not.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Some fine actors have contracted to appear in "How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life)," a multi-generational family comedy premiering Wednesday night on ABC. It should do their careers no lasting harm. It is the sort of neither-here-nor-there sitcom that can make me feel faintly sad for the form, and by extension for the health of the nation, and yet it is no worse than so many others that come and go and sometimes, to my surprise, come and stay. If it can only stop pawing at your leg and licking your face for a moment, it may settle down into something you would allow in the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
ABC is clearly seeing red, axing two more shows: “Red Widow” and “How to Live With Your Parents for the Rest of Your Life.”  Based on the Dutch format, “Red Widow” had a lackluster midseason launch, averaging a 1.1 rating in the 18-49 demographic and 5 million viewers. The series starred Rahda Mitchell as a stay-at-home mom who finds herself embroiled in familial ties with the Russian mob. The thriller completed its eight-episode run Sunday. Breath-catcher “How to Live With Your Parents for the Rest of Your Life” also won't return for another season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Watching the first half hour or so of "Maneater," a thinking woman may find herself grinding her teeth so angrily that, should she be of a certain age and dental history, she may need a new crown or two. The Lifetime miniseries, the first half of which premieres Saturday and all of which is based on Gigi Levangie Grazer's book of the same name, follows the gold-digging adventures of Clarissa (Sarah Chalke) and her entourage of similarly acquisitively romantic pals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Some fine actors have contracted to appear in "How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life)," a multi-generational family comedy premiering Wednesday night on ABC. It should do their careers no lasting harm. It is the sort of neither-here-nor-there sitcom that can make me feel faintly sad for the form, and by extension for the health of the nation, and yet it is no worse than so many others that come and go and sometimes, to my surprise, come and stay. If it can only stop pawing at your leg and licking your face for a moment, it may settle down into something you would allow in the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2007 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
Zach Braff made a declaration Wednesday afternoon about his NBC comedy: " 'Scrubs' can go on with or without me." Say, que? "Scrubs" creator Bill Lawrence, Braff and costar Sarah Chalke appeared on a panel to discuss the future of the series. If it has one, is the key question, as Braff weighs whether to renew his contract at the end of this season and Lawrence decides whether he would return without the show's narrator and star.
NEWS
September 26, 2002 | SCOTT SANDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Scrubs" begins its second year of residency on NBC tonight at 8:30 facing a critical test: Can it live up to the expectations that come with its new time slot, after ratings heavyweight "Friends," which won its first Emmy for best comedy series on Sunday? Only time will tell. Interestingly enough, that wait-and-see sentiment is also one of the themes with which the young doctors of Sacred Heart Hospital must grapple tonight. For J.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Never has draining a stomach been funnier than on NBC's new "Scrubs." All right, you have to be there. "Scrubs" ranges from silliness to wonderful silliness as prime time's first medical comedy that generates big laughs, its young protagonist starting his career as an intern in a chaotic teaching facility only a bit less twisted than the one in Paddy Chayefsky's dark satire, "The Hospital." Joining J.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Watching the first half hour or so of "Maneater," a thinking woman may find herself grinding her teeth so angrily that, should she be of a certain age and dental history, she may need a new crown or two. The Lifetime miniseries, the first half of which premieres Saturday and all of which is based on Gigi Levangie Grazer's book of the same name, follows the gold-digging adventures of Clarissa (Sarah Chalke) and her entourage of similarly acquisitively romantic pals.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | Chris Barton
After first coming on the scene as a replacement for oldest daughter Becky Conner on TV's "Roseanne" in the early '90s, Sarah Chalke has come into her own as the clumsy, quick-witted Dr. Elliot Reid on NBC's warped medical comedy "Scrubs." When not visiting her native Canada, Chalke enjoys some of the many benefits of living in Los Angeles: namely, hiking, hunting for antiques and ultimately feeling free to soak up our beautiful sunny skies -- or not.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Chalke may have been a teen-ager from Canada who hadn't yet acted in the United States, but she wasn't a bit daunted when asked to take over a long-established role on ABC's highly rated "Roseanne" last year. In fact, she's settled comfortably into the role and don't be surprised if you overhear some people remark: "Someone else played Becky?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2002 | SCOTT SANDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patient name: "Scrubs." Date of birth: Oct. 2, 2001. Symptoms: The chief complaint is anxiety over the end of the first season, which will occur next Tuesday, preceded by an episode tonight at 9:30 on NBC. Diagnosis: The patient exhibits signs of hysteria and an active imagination, envisioning itself in a hospital populated by interning doctors named J.D. (Zach Braff, in actuality), Turk (Donald Faison) and Elliot (Sarah Chalke). They can be tormented by taskmaster Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2008 | Maria Elena Fernandez
Before the writers strike, the biggest mystery surrounding NBC's "Scrubs" was whether J.D. (Zach Braff) and Elliot (Sarah Chalke) would pull a Ross-Rachel and finally be together in the hospital comedy's final season. But now the bigger question seems to be whether fans of the 7-year-old comedy will watch the finale on NBC, ABC or DVD. Although NBC had ordered 18 episodes for this season, meant to be its last, and 12 were completed before the strike, the network has not committed to allowing producers to complete the final six episodes.
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