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Sarah Goldman

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BUSINESS
July 13, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD
Golfers are probably used to just about anything when it comes to fashion on the green. Still, the pants that Sarah Goldman had made for her husband stand out. They are blue, with small red bulls--each stitched in the shape of the Merrill Lynch logo. They're the last thing in taste, and they went over like a cool drink at the 19th hole. Nearly 200 Merrill Lynch employees have ordered them.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD
Golfers are probably used to just about anything when it comes to fashion on the green. Still, the pants that Sarah Goldman had made for her husband stand out. They are blue, with small red bulls--each stitched in the shape of the Merrill Lynch logo. They're the last thing in taste, and they went over like a cool drink at the 19th hole. Nearly 200 Merrill Lynch employees have ordered them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1995 | M. E. WARREN
The title of James Sherman's "Beau Jest" encapsulates the action of this charming comedy in which a young woman hires an actor to impersonate her imaginary boyfriend. At the Studio Theatre of Long Beach Playhouse, the title also aptly describes a lovely production that is full of good humor. Sarah Goldman is a nice Jewish girl who wants nothing more than to please her parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mistaken identity has been successfully mined for comedy by everyone from Shakespeare to Larry Shue. And for proof that the well has not run dry, look to James Sherman's "Beau Jest," which premiered in Chicago in 1989 and is now in a very funny production at the North Coast Repertory Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1997 | T.H. McCULLOH
The Huntington Beach Playhouse revival of James Sherman's "Beau Jest" is a good example of how upbeat staging and interesting casting can bring to life a solid but rather ordinary comedy. Sherman's play--about a Jewish daughter who hides from her parents the fact that her boyfriend is not Jewish and, even worse, that the escort she hires to play her Jewish doctor fiance is actually a Gentile--is often funny, but it's too familiar to provide any surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Imagine a play that's something of a hybrid of Wendy Wasserstein's 1984 "Isn't It Romantic" and Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick's 1970 "Norman Is that You?" (if you can remember back to the antediluvian '70s), and you may come up with James Sherman's "Beau Jest." More or less. Here and there. Now and then.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1996 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's never any trouble figuring out which character in a Neil Simon play is the playwright's alter-ego. It's even easier than usual in "I Ought to Be in Pictures," playing at the Elite Theater Company's theater in Oxnard, directed by Patricia Lynn- Strickland. Of the three characters, two are female. Libby Tucker (Deborah Probe) is the long-estranged teenage daughter who arrives, unannounced, on the doorstep of her father's West Hollywood bungalow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chicago theater has achieved a bizarrely inflated reputation over the years, fueled in part by the Second City comedy group, and by Steppenwolf Theatre Company, which emerged from a church basement to produce such stars as John Malkovich, Joan Allen and Gary Sinise. Another part is an underdog status, neither Broadway nor Hollywood, full of well-intentioned small theaters.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of anti-war protesters marched Saturday from the White House through the streets of downtown Washington to the Capitol, condemning President Bush for starting a war in the Persian Gulf. Some demanded an immediate end to United Nations sanctions against Iraq. Estimates of the number of participants varied. U.S. Park Police put the number at about 25,000, but some protest leaders estimated the number at close to 100,000.
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